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You all had full time jobs. The ones that worked outside, do you any tips for the real hot days?

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  • You all had full time jobs. The ones that worked outside, do you any tips for the real hot days?

    New Jersey Temperature are in the nineties today and tomorrow.
    I will take the ice cold weather, any day of the week.

  • #2
    Growing up in Phoenix and working construction during summer months (during the university years) you had to figure it out or you wouldn't make it, literally. We didn't have a day or two, we had four months (30 years later, it's up to five months) of 100-115 degree temps every day. My routine was to eat a big dinner of pasta or the like and drink water mixed 50/50 with an electrolyte sports drink low in sugar. Breakfast of bananas and eggs. Lunch was typically bananas, peanut butter and a can of tuna. No extra sweets, cereal, or junk food, or you would feel like crap very quickly. Drink lots of water mixed with low-sugar sports drink, and drink before you feel thirsty. Wear long sleeves to keep the sun off your skin. Some of our crew took salt tablets with the water, but everyone's chemistry is different. I advise against drinking the real sweet sports drinks like Gatorade unless you mix extra water with it.

    Comment


    • #3
      The all time best suggestion I can give you is DON'T GET OLD! Up until a very few years ago, I could shrug off the high heat and humidity, but it suddenly caught up with me. Now if I stay out in the heat a little too long, I can't get my breath and I start seeing spots. A few minutes more out in the heat and I start snapping at the spots like a dog snapping at flies---then it's no BS time to find some AC and cold water.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Proverbs View Post
        Growing up in Phoenix and working construction during summer months (during the university years) you had to figure it out or you wouldn't make it, literally. We didn't have a day or two, we had four months (30 years later, it's up to five months) of 100-115 degree temps every day. My routine was to eat a big dinner of pasta or the like and drink water mixed 50/50 with an electrolyte sports drink low in sugar. Breakfast of bananas and eggs. Lunch was typically bananas, peanut butter and a can of tuna. No extra sweets, cereal, or junk food, or you would feel like crap very quickly. Drink lots of water mixed with low-sugar sports drink, and drink before you feel thirsty. Wear long sleeves to keep the sun off your skin. Some of our crew took salt tablets with the water, but everyone's chemistry is different. I advise against drinking the real sweet sports drinks like Gatorade unless you mix extra water with it.
        Great suggestions ? Thanks
        I remember in high school playing football in the August heat to make the cut.
        Sometimes there were double or triple sessions. I drank an entire litter bottle of Mountain Dew soda.
        That was the worst time for being thirsty in my life. It was horrible wearing all that football gear in August.

        Comment


        • #5
          Heat exhaustion is a condition that can be eased by getting out of the heat. Continued exposure to high heat can lead to Heat Stroke, which is a life saving condition and needs immediate attention. Your body gets so hot you go into a downward cascade of increasing severe situation. Electrolytes go wild and your blood pH can begin to change. Normal pH range is 7.35 to 7.45, go outside that range by over the .10 and you might not pull through. Sodium, Potassium, Chloride and CO2 control the body pH. In the Hospital we put people right in a tub of ice cubes to get the temp down.
          On the flight line the temp could reach 115 or higher and the men had to be very careful in working there. If you are the guy that has to crawl inside a wing when it is 115, he can tell you all about heat. They watched each other for early signs of trouble and were able to prevent heat strokes.

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          • #6
            In the nineties?
            Call me back when the temp hits 113° and you have to put down a built up roof!
            THEN...I'll talk to you about working in the heat!

            Comment


            • #7
              Drinks lots of water, go for low sugar electrolyte drinks. Gatorade's Propel and G2 mixes are good for this. Take breaks when you need them. Recognize the signs of Heat Stroke / Exhaustion and don't push yourself further than your limits.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                In the nineties?
                Call me back when the temp hits 113° and you have to put down a built up roof!
                THEN...I'll talk to you about working in the heat!
                Roofers start at first light in the early morning and quit early in the afternoon during the extreme heat..

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Buckshott00 View Post
                  Drinks lots of water, go for low sugar electrolyte drinks. Gatorade's Propel and G2 mixes are good for this. Take breaks when you need them. Recognize the signs of Heat Stroke / Exhaustion and don't push yourself further than your limits.
                  Buckshot, If its early morning before work, I pack up three cold plastic 12oz bottle waters in my small cooler bag, with a couple ice packs. I take two cloth hand towels for the sweaty face and I also kept a roll of paper towels in my work truck.

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                  • #10
                    Putting in hay on the farm was always a treat. You could either be in the blazing sun unloading the wagon, or up in the mow where it was probably well over a hundred degrees. Breathing in the chaff was a bonus. I'd hawk up gobs of green and black snot for a good couple hours every night after work. Being a teenager, though, I wasn't too bothered by the heat. We boys all felt pretty superior doing manly work while our friends all had summer jobs at McDonalds and K-mart. Still, after each load we'd go into the milkhouse and soak our heads under the faucet and drink straight from the tap. Bad thing was, it was sulphur-water; you were so thirsty you really didn't care, but the burps and farts could get pretty fierce. This is probably the grossest post I've ever written.

                    My uncle's hired man would sometimes bring a jug of something he called "switzel." I don't know what all was in it; I think it was water mixed with vinegar and ginger, maybe cinnamon. He swore by it, claiming that just one swig completely quenched his thirst. We younger guys would point out that it wasn't just a matter of wetting your throat, you had to actually have water in your body, but he'd just call us "know-it-alls" and ignore us. He never keeled over, though, so I guess it did something for him.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                      Putting in hay on the farm was always a treat. You could either be in the blazing sun unloading the wagon, or up in the mow where it was probably well over a hundred degrees. Breathing in the chaff was a bonus. I'd hawk up gobs of green and black snot for a good couple hours every night after work. Being a teenager, though, I wasn't too bothered by the heat. We boys all felt pretty superior doing manly work while our friends all had summer jobs at McDonalds and K-mart. Still, after each load we'd go into the milkhouse and soak our heads under the faucet and drink straight from the tap. Bad thing was, it was sulphur-water; you were so thirsty you really didn't care, but the burps and farts could get pretty fierce. This is probably the grossest post I've ever written.

                      My uncle's hired man would sometimes bring a jug of something he called "switzel." I don't know what all was in it; I think it was water mixed with vinegar and ginger, maybe cinnamon. He swore by it, claiming that just one swig completely quenched his thirst. We younger guys would point out that it wasn't just a matter of wetting your throat, you had to actually have water in your body, but he'd just call us "know-it-alls" and ignore us. He never keeled over, though, so I guess it did something for him.
                      I'll stack hay in the field all day over stacking 100 bales inside a barn! LOL!
                      Inside a metal barn in summer heat is a killer!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                        In the nineties?
                        Call me back when the temp hits 113° and you have to put down a built up roof!
                        THEN...I'll talk to you about working in the heat!
                        When your contract calls for completion by a specific date and time, you work until you're done, heat be damned.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                          Putting in hay on the farm was always a treat. You could either be in the blazing sun unloading the wagon, or up in the mow where it was probably well over a hundred degrees. Breathing in the chaff was a bonus. I'd hawk up gobs of green and black snot for a good couple hours every night after work. Being a teenager, though, I wasn't too bothered by the heat. We boys all felt pretty superior doing manly work while our friends all had summer jobs at McDonalds and K-mart. Still, after each load we'd go into the milkhouse and soak our heads under the faucet and drink straight from the tap. Bad thing was, it was sulphur-water; you were so thirsty you really didn't care, but the burps and farts could get pretty fierce. This is probably the grossest post I've ever written.

                          My uncle's hired man would sometimes bring a jug of something he called "switzel." I don't know what all was in it; I think it was water mixed with vinegar and ginger, maybe cinnamon. He swore by it, claiming that just one swig completely quenched his thirst. We younger guys would point out that it wasn't just a matter of wetting your throat, you had to actually have water in your body, but he'd just call us "know-it-alls" and ignore us. He never keeled over, though, so I guess it did something for him.
                          Yep. Wasn't too bad when the mow was just getting started, but up near the top, it was pretty bad. That was when you'd start getting dive-bombed by the wasps, too. We earned our four bucks an hour, that's for sure!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            After forty years working heavy hi-way construction, you learn a few things about how to beat the summer heat. You Don,t. Learning how to tolerate it though is actually a change in how you live to prepare for it.My diet would change , no meat, or very little, no beer no matter how cold, actually just try to limit your intake. Lunches eat light, with lots of foods that contain pulp , apples, oranges, tomatoes, melons, they seem to help you retain the water your drinking I never your system. Dress with light colored shirts and pants, wearing hard hats I kept a wet sponge cooled under my hat. I, d roll my pant legs up high, and unzip my zipper some to allow air to vent up my legs. Sunglasses not only protect your eyes but keep dry air from blowing into your sockets. Limit caffeine, and fill up early before you start work and never pass an opportunity to drink if your thirsty or not. Don,t think about it, it only makes it seem worse, when guys would complain about the heat I,d always remark that it was indeed a little warm ,but somewhere someone was doing a hot job. Lemon water is good for you, no sugar though, Gator aid and electrical lite drinks are good late in the day but easily over done .

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                              Putting in hay on the farm was always a treat. You could either be in the blazing sun unloading the wagon, or up in the mow where it was probably well over a hundred degrees. Breathing in the chaff was a bonus. I'd hawk up gobs of green and black snot for a good couple hours every night after work. Being a teenager, though, I wasn't too bothered by the heat. We boys all felt pretty superior doing manly work while our friends all had summer jobs at McDonalds and K-mart. Still, after each load we'd go into the milkhouse and soak our heads under the faucet and drink straight from the tap. Bad thing was, it was sulphur-water; you were so thirsty you really didn't care, but the burps and farts could get pretty fierce. This is probably the grossest post I've ever written.

                              My uncle's hired man would sometimes bring a jug of something he called "switzel." I don't know what all was in it; I think it was water mixed with vinegar and ginger, maybe cinnamon. He swore by it, claiming that just one swig completely quenched his thirst. We younger guys would point out that it wasn't just a matter of wetting your throat, you had to actually have water in your body, but he'd just call us "know-it-alls" and ignore us. He never keeled over, though, so I guess it did something for him.
                              Back in the mid 60's when the square bale was the norm and the minimum wage was $1.25/hr, a three man crew (driver, loader, stacker) could earn pretty fair wages at .03/bale.

                              Comment

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