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Do you guys carry any kind of a survival kit in the course of your ordinary outdoor activities - hiking, fishing, hunting, etc.? If so, what's in it?

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  • Do you guys carry any kind of a survival kit in the course of your ordinary outdoor activities - hiking, fishing, hunting, etc.? If so, what's in it?

    Do you guys carry any kind of a survival kit in the course of your ordinary outdoor activities - hiking, fishing, hunting, etc.? If so, what's in it?

  • #2
    That article OL featured recently about the 4 survival stories made me think about this. I believe I'm generally a careful, well-prepared person, but I must confess I don't take survival/first aid preparations as seriously as I could. I don't frequent wilderness areas, true, but a broken leg even a mile from the vehicle could be dangerous in bad weather or if nobody knows where you are, especially if one is poorly equipped.

    Comment


    • #3
      I keep a survival type kit in my car. It was a present I received years ago...it is actually still in the shrink wrap, haha. It is both a medical and car survival kit(everything from band-aids to an ice scraper). If I am hunting and carrying a backpack than I have a basic first aid kit as well as things like an extra pair of base layers/socks. It's like a small 5x5 zip up case that I got for free. It has bandaids, gauze, tape, medications I may need, and creams for burns, etc. I then wrapped all the contents in a mosquito mask net so I always have one of those available. This is pretty much always the case when hunting on property I do not own and know well. If I am hunting on my own property than the answer is no...I usually don't really carry anything besides my phone, haha. Every boat I remember being on has had a survival kit stashed somewhere.

      Comment


      • #4
        You make me sad, hft. (JK)

        I'm with JM that if I'm out back in my stand I have nothing more than my normal pocket items, knife, flashlight, lighter, mulitool, phone, pistol and spare mag, a couple of band-aids (which live in my wallet, amazing how often I hand them to people or slap one on a kid) and duct tape, most times a tourniquet (I carry a SWAT or TK4 due to small size plus ability to work on small people's limbs, both are smaller than a pack of cigarretes to have in the pocket and I wrap duct tape around the wrapper), plus the ability to scream like a woman in distress loud enough for my nearest neighbors to hear me.

        I keep three distinct kits in my backpack when doing most things. All of them are in a typical IFAK (Say 6" x 8" x 3")sized pouch and sometimes I'll opt out of one or the other depending on what and where I'm going. I don't take a full survival kit to sit by the lake with the kids. I won't bother carrying the first aid kit if I don't plan on being out more than a couple of hours and I'm alone. The trauma kit is generally along for the ride in any case. The first aid kit can provide comfort. The trauma kit can seriously buy you time and save you with a serious cut or GSW or slice your leg open on a tree step. It's one of those things, you take a good slice or an accidental shot somehow while hunting or fishing, there's very little in a typical first aid kit that's going to help you. Femoral bleedout can happen in under 90 seconds with loss of consciousness happening sooner. The truck just isn't close enough. Basically, the other two kits can manage anything that the first aid can do. Frankly, you don't really NEED a band-aid to walk out of the woods, but at times they're really nice to have.

        If I'm out hunting or fishing out of sight of the truck all day, or I'm on an overnight, There's a boo-boo level first aid kit with small bandages, bandaids, guaze, tape, ointments, painkillers, scissors, knife, you get it, tossed in the bag.

        Similarly on top of my normal pocket stuff there's a survival kit with water purification tabs, firestarters, matches, lighter, flint, e blankets, compass, whistle, mirror, chapstick, sometimes pocket hand warmer depending on the weather, small headlamp or flashlight, duct tape, safety pins a couple other odds and ends that are escaping me. There will be a water bottle and a couple of granola bars and jerky somewhere in my bag.

        The trauma kit is a whole other animal, is the one some will judge as over the top, the only one that's never come into play, and the one I sincerely hope I never run into anyone that needs it. But if you need one, you need it RIGHT NOW. A couple of tourniquets, compressed gauze, isreali or E bandages, chest seals, Celox, Nasal airway, and a chest needle. Am seeking some training on that last presently. If you clearly have tension pneumothorax from a chest wound.. I'd still be hesitant to stick you with the level of "you just do this" training I currently have on that.

        The first aid kit has come to play with others I've met in the woods and on the trail or was out with more often than myself. The survival kit has gotten raided more on convenience or comfort as well on overnights it gets used as the primary source for fire starters while still keeping the other items in reserve.

        They all weigh a pound or so each and one can fit in the back of my fishing vest without even really knowing it. At two, I feel it. Most times if I plan on covering any kind of ground I have a backpack and they toss in or strap to the outside easily and with no fuss. Worth their weight in gold when you want one.

        My only real advice on the kits is to make the items in them dedicated solely to that kit. You start raiding them around the house and things won't have been put back when you want them. Use an item in need, replace it ASAP.

        One thing I will say, I know some of mine may seem excessive. What happens is you encounter something that makes you think about it. You decide you should have the right gear. When you get gear you think, I should know how to use this stuff, so you get training. Once you have the knowledge, you realize how much better it is to have the gear at need, as the knowledge is good, but knowledge with the right tools is far better. For me, the defensive and medical end has become a pursuit and hobby. I'm always trying to expand the capabilities. That being said, I'd be a fool then to not actually be ready at need. I've taken red cross classes over the years and recently have taken some classes that weren't purely medical, but got into the basic application of the immediate action trauma items, I'm currently seeking a good local class for that.

        Edited to Add- And this isn't golf. I'll admit I have a hard time as I go down this road making the call that "Ok, my defensive handgunning or my medical knowledge are "good enough".

        Comment


        • #5
          Years ago I could care less about "survival kits" and would never carry anything when hunting/fishing. But a few years ago I changed my tune and now always carry a small first aid kit and a small "get home" kit when out hunting/fishing.

          My first aid kit is pretty basic: various sized band aids, gauze, aspirin, antibiotics, burn cream, quick clot, alcohol pads, tissues (aka toilet paper) and maybe a few other odds and ends. All of this is in a small waterproof container that fits easily in a pocket.

          My "survival kit" is also in a small waterproof container that usually goes in my pack. It has: small swiss army knife, lighter, matches, ferro rod, dry tinder (cotton balls), duct tape, a hank of paracord, space blanket, small mirror, button compass, and iodine tablets (which reminds me, I have to replace those this year).

          Mind you, I don't hunt or fish in any kind of real "wilderness" areas, and am always an hour walk from civilization. But I like knowing I have a few things just in case.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
            You make me sad, hft. (JK)

            I'm with JM that if I'm out back in my stand I have nothing more than my normal pocket items, knife, flashlight, lighter, mulitool, phone, pistol and spare mag, a couple of band-aids (which live in my wallet, amazing how often I hand them to people or slap one on a kid) and duct tape, most times a tourniquet (I carry a SWAT or TK4 due to small size plus ability to work on small people's limbs, both are smaller than a pack of cigarretes to have in the pocket and I wrap duct tape around the wrapper), plus the ability to scream like a woman in distress loud enough for my nearest neighbors to hear me.

            I keep three distinct kits in my backpack when doing most things. All of them are in a typical IFAK (Say 6" x 8" x 3")sized pouch and sometimes I'll opt out of one or the other depending on what and where I'm going. I don't take a full survival kit to sit by the lake with the kids. I won't bother carrying the first aid kit if I don't plan on being out more than a couple of hours and I'm alone. The trauma kit is generally along for the ride in any case. The first aid kit can provide comfort. The trauma kit can seriously buy you time and save you with a serious cut or GSW or slice your leg open on a tree step. It's one of those things, you take a good slice or an accidental shot somehow while hunting or fishing, there's very little in a typical first aid kit that's going to help you. Femoral bleedout can happen in under 90 seconds with loss of consciousness happening sooner. The truck just isn't close enough. Basically, the other two kits can manage anything that the first aid can do. Frankly, you don't really NEED a band-aid to walk out of the woods, but at times they're really nice to have.

            If I'm out hunting or fishing out of sight of the truck all day, or I'm on an overnight, There's a boo-boo level first aid kit with small bandages, bandaids, guaze, tape, ointments, painkillers, scissors, knife, you get it, tossed in the bag.

            Similarly on top of my normal pocket stuff there's a survival kit with water purification tabs, firestarters, matches, lighter, flint, e blankets, compass, whistle, mirror, chapstick, sometimes pocket hand warmer depending on the weather, small headlamp or flashlight, duct tape, safety pins a couple other odds and ends that are escaping me. There will be a water bottle and a couple of granola bars and jerky somewhere in my bag.

            The trauma kit is a whole other animal, is the one some will judge as over the top, the only one that's never come into play, and the one I sincerely hope I never run into anyone that needs it. But if you need one, you need it RIGHT NOW. A couple of tourniquets, compressed gauze, isreali or E bandages, chest seals, Celox, Nasal airway, and a chest needle. Am seeking some training on that last presently. If you clearly have tension pneumothorax from a chest wound.. I'd still be hesitant to stick you with the level of "you just do this" training I currently have on that.

            The first aid kit has come to play with others I've met in the woods and on the trail or was out with more often than myself. The survival kit has gotten raided more on convenience or comfort as well on overnights it gets used as the primary source for fire starters while still keeping the other items in reserve.

            They all weigh a pound or so each and one can fit in the back of my fishing vest without even really knowing it. At two, I feel it. Most times if I plan on covering any kind of ground I have a backpack and they toss in or strap to the outside easily and with no fuss. Worth their weight in gold when you want one.

            My only real advice on the kits is to make the items in them dedicated solely to that kit. You start raiding them around the house and things won't have been put back when you want them. Use an item in need, replace it ASAP.

            One thing I will say, I know some of mine may seem excessive. What happens is you encounter something that makes you think about it. You decide you should have the right gear. When you get gear you think, I should know how to use this stuff, so you get training. Once you have the knowledge, you realize how much better it is to have the gear at need, as the knowledge is good, but knowledge with the right tools is far better. For me, the defensive and medical end has become a pursuit and hobby. I'm always trying to expand the capabilities. That being said, I'd be a fool then to not actually be ready at need. I've taken red cross classes over the years and recently have taken some classes that weren't purely medical, but got into the basic application of the immediate action trauma items, I'm currently seeking a good local class for that.

            Edited to Add- And this isn't golf. I'll admit I have a hard time as I go down this road making the call that "Ok, my defensive handgunning or my medical knowledge are "good enough".
            I've often thought of upgrading my first aid kit into more of a "trauma level" kit but was unsure of what to add. Thanks for the suggestions jcarlin. And I'm with you: I'm first aid and CPR certified from the red cross, but would like to find some sort of training that goes more in depth. I believe knowledge is the most important tool you have in any survival situation.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
              You make me sad, hft. (JK)

              I'm with JM that if I'm out back in my stand I have nothing more than my normal pocket items, knife, flashlight, lighter, mulitool, phone, pistol and spare mag, a couple of band-aids (which live in my wallet, amazing how often I hand them to people or slap one on a kid) and duct tape, most times a tourniquet (I carry a SWAT or TK4 due to small size plus ability to work on small people's limbs, both are smaller than a pack of cigarretes to have in the pocket and I wrap duct tape around the wrapper), plus the ability to scream like a woman in distress loud enough for my nearest neighbors to hear me.

              I keep three distinct kits in my backpack when doing most things. All of them are in a typical IFAK (Say 6" x 8" x 3")sized pouch and sometimes I'll opt out of one or the other depending on what and where I'm going. I don't take a full survival kit to sit by the lake with the kids. I won't bother carrying the first aid kit if I don't plan on being out more than a couple of hours and I'm alone. The trauma kit is generally along for the ride in any case. The first aid kit can provide comfort. The trauma kit can seriously buy you time and save you with a serious cut or GSW or slice your leg open on a tree step. It's one of those things, you take a good slice or an accidental shot somehow while hunting or fishing, there's very little in a typical first aid kit that's going to help you. Femoral bleedout can happen in under 90 seconds with loss of consciousness happening sooner. The truck just isn't close enough. Basically, the other two kits can manage anything that the first aid can do. Frankly, you don't really NEED a band-aid to walk out of the woods, but at times they're really nice to have.

              If I'm out hunting or fishing out of sight of the truck all day, or I'm on an overnight, There's a boo-boo level first aid kit with small bandages, bandaids, guaze, tape, ointments, painkillers, scissors, knife, you get it, tossed in the bag.

              Similarly on top of my normal pocket stuff there's a survival kit with water purification tabs, firestarters, matches, lighter, flint, e blankets, compass, whistle, mirror, chapstick, sometimes pocket hand warmer depending on the weather, small headlamp or flashlight, duct tape, safety pins a couple other odds and ends that are escaping me. There will be a water bottle and a couple of granola bars and jerky somewhere in my bag.

              The trauma kit is a whole other animal, is the one some will judge as over the top, the only one that's never come into play, and the one I sincerely hope I never run into anyone that needs it. But if you need one, you need it RIGHT NOW. A couple of tourniquets, compressed gauze, isreali or E bandages, chest seals, Celox, Nasal airway, and a chest needle. Am seeking some training on that last presently. If you clearly have tension pneumothorax from a chest wound.. I'd still be hesitant to stick you with the level of "you just do this" training I currently have on that.

              The first aid kit has come to play with others I've met in the woods and on the trail or was out with more often than myself. The survival kit has gotten raided more on convenience or comfort as well on overnights it gets used as the primary source for fire starters while still keeping the other items in reserve.

              They all weigh a pound or so each and one can fit in the back of my fishing vest without even really knowing it. At two, I feel it. Most times if I plan on covering any kind of ground I have a backpack and they toss in or strap to the outside easily and with no fuss. Worth their weight in gold when you want one.

              My only real advice on the kits is to make the items in them dedicated solely to that kit. You start raiding them around the house and things won't have been put back when you want them. Use an item in need, replace it ASAP.

              One thing I will say, I know some of mine may seem excessive. What happens is you encounter something that makes you think about it. You decide you should have the right gear. When you get gear you think, I should know how to use this stuff, so you get training. Once you have the knowledge, you realize how much better it is to have the gear at need, as the knowledge is good, but knowledge with the right tools is far better. For me, the defensive and medical end has become a pursuit and hobby. I'm always trying to expand the capabilities. That being said, I'd be a fool then to not actually be ready at need. I've taken red cross classes over the years and recently have taken some classes that weren't purely medical, but got into the basic application of the immediate action trauma items, I'm currently seeking a good local class for that.

              Edited to Add- And this isn't golf. I'll admit I have a hard time as I go down this road making the call that "Ok, my defensive handgunning or my medical knowledge are "good enough".
              Hope it helps someone, but I'm no med expert. There are some good pre-assembled minimalist pocket kits and more out there from Tactical Response, AR500.com, or Skinny Medic, lots of sources.. and you could look up what's in the MIl issue IFAK as well. Bleeding and airways. If you can stop the bleeding or stop air infiltrating the chest cavity... you'll have time to deal with the rest hopefully.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                You make me sad, hft. (JK)

                I'm with JM that if I'm out back in my stand I have nothing more than my normal pocket items, knife, flashlight, lighter, mulitool, phone, pistol and spare mag, a couple of band-aids (which live in my wallet, amazing how often I hand them to people or slap one on a kid) and duct tape, most times a tourniquet (I carry a SWAT or TK4 due to small size plus ability to work on small people's limbs, both are smaller than a pack of cigarretes to have in the pocket and I wrap duct tape around the wrapper), plus the ability to scream like a woman in distress loud enough for my nearest neighbors to hear me.

                I keep three distinct kits in my backpack when doing most things. All of them are in a typical IFAK (Say 6" x 8" x 3")sized pouch and sometimes I'll opt out of one or the other depending on what and where I'm going. I don't take a full survival kit to sit by the lake with the kids. I won't bother carrying the first aid kit if I don't plan on being out more than a couple of hours and I'm alone. The trauma kit is generally along for the ride in any case. The first aid kit can provide comfort. The trauma kit can seriously buy you time and save you with a serious cut or GSW or slice your leg open on a tree step. It's one of those things, you take a good slice or an accidental shot somehow while hunting or fishing, there's very little in a typical first aid kit that's going to help you. Femoral bleedout can happen in under 90 seconds with loss of consciousness happening sooner. The truck just isn't close enough. Basically, the other two kits can manage anything that the first aid can do. Frankly, you don't really NEED a band-aid to walk out of the woods, but at times they're really nice to have.

                If I'm out hunting or fishing out of sight of the truck all day, or I'm on an overnight, There's a boo-boo level first aid kit with small bandages, bandaids, guaze, tape, ointments, painkillers, scissors, knife, you get it, tossed in the bag.

                Similarly on top of my normal pocket stuff there's a survival kit with water purification tabs, firestarters, matches, lighter, flint, e blankets, compass, whistle, mirror, chapstick, sometimes pocket hand warmer depending on the weather, small headlamp or flashlight, duct tape, safety pins a couple other odds and ends that are escaping me. There will be a water bottle and a couple of granola bars and jerky somewhere in my bag.

                The trauma kit is a whole other animal, is the one some will judge as over the top, the only one that's never come into play, and the one I sincerely hope I never run into anyone that needs it. But if you need one, you need it RIGHT NOW. A couple of tourniquets, compressed gauze, isreali or E bandages, chest seals, Celox, Nasal airway, and a chest needle. Am seeking some training on that last presently. If you clearly have tension pneumothorax from a chest wound.. I'd still be hesitant to stick you with the level of "you just do this" training I currently have on that.

                The first aid kit has come to play with others I've met in the woods and on the trail or was out with more often than myself. The survival kit has gotten raided more on convenience or comfort as well on overnights it gets used as the primary source for fire starters while still keeping the other items in reserve.

                They all weigh a pound or so each and one can fit in the back of my fishing vest without even really knowing it. At two, I feel it. Most times if I plan on covering any kind of ground I have a backpack and they toss in or strap to the outside easily and with no fuss. Worth their weight in gold when you want one.

                My only real advice on the kits is to make the items in them dedicated solely to that kit. You start raiding them around the house and things won't have been put back when you want them. Use an item in need, replace it ASAP.

                One thing I will say, I know some of mine may seem excessive. What happens is you encounter something that makes you think about it. You decide you should have the right gear. When you get gear you think, I should know how to use this stuff, so you get training. Once you have the knowledge, you realize how much better it is to have the gear at need, as the knowledge is good, but knowledge with the right tools is far better. For me, the defensive and medical end has become a pursuit and hobby. I'm always trying to expand the capabilities. That being said, I'd be a fool then to not actually be ready at need. I've taken red cross classes over the years and recently have taken some classes that weren't purely medical, but got into the basic application of the immediate action trauma items, I'm currently seeking a good local class for that.

                Edited to Add- And this isn't golf. I'll admit I have a hard time as I go down this road making the call that "Ok, my defensive handgunning or my medical knowledge are "good enough".
                Glad to see you are so well equipped and proactive. I have a Medic bag similar to what I had in the late '60's. Supplies today are a lot more advanced than what we had back then. One thing I do is put dressings in vacuum pack pkg so they stay clean and don't take up much space. My injuries in the field have been muscular skeletal type and I have managed to get my self out.
                For fishing you might add a pair of side cutters in case you have to cut a hook.
                For summer and winter you might add some suntan oil, lip stick and mosquito spray.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                  You make me sad, hft. (JK)

                  I'm with JM that if I'm out back in my stand I have nothing more than my normal pocket items, knife, flashlight, lighter, mulitool, phone, pistol and spare mag, a couple of band-aids (which live in my wallet, amazing how often I hand them to people or slap one on a kid) and duct tape, most times a tourniquet (I carry a SWAT or TK4 due to small size plus ability to work on small people's limbs, both are smaller than a pack of cigarretes to have in the pocket and I wrap duct tape around the wrapper), plus the ability to scream like a woman in distress loud enough for my nearest neighbors to hear me.

                  I keep three distinct kits in my backpack when doing most things. All of them are in a typical IFAK (Say 6" x 8" x 3")sized pouch and sometimes I'll opt out of one or the other depending on what and where I'm going. I don't take a full survival kit to sit by the lake with the kids. I won't bother carrying the first aid kit if I don't plan on being out more than a couple of hours and I'm alone. The trauma kit is generally along for the ride in any case. The first aid kit can provide comfort. The trauma kit can seriously buy you time and save you with a serious cut or GSW or slice your leg open on a tree step. It's one of those things, you take a good slice or an accidental shot somehow while hunting or fishing, there's very little in a typical first aid kit that's going to help you. Femoral bleedout can happen in under 90 seconds with loss of consciousness happening sooner. The truck just isn't close enough. Basically, the other two kits can manage anything that the first aid can do. Frankly, you don't really NEED a band-aid to walk out of the woods, but at times they're really nice to have.

                  If I'm out hunting or fishing out of sight of the truck all day, or I'm on an overnight, There's a boo-boo level first aid kit with small bandages, bandaids, guaze, tape, ointments, painkillers, scissors, knife, you get it, tossed in the bag.

                  Similarly on top of my normal pocket stuff there's a survival kit with water purification tabs, firestarters, matches, lighter, flint, e blankets, compass, whistle, mirror, chapstick, sometimes pocket hand warmer depending on the weather, small headlamp or flashlight, duct tape, safety pins a couple other odds and ends that are escaping me. There will be a water bottle and a couple of granola bars and jerky somewhere in my bag.

                  The trauma kit is a whole other animal, is the one some will judge as over the top, the only one that's never come into play, and the one I sincerely hope I never run into anyone that needs it. But if you need one, you need it RIGHT NOW. A couple of tourniquets, compressed gauze, isreali or E bandages, chest seals, Celox, Nasal airway, and a chest needle. Am seeking some training on that last presently. If you clearly have tension pneumothorax from a chest wound.. I'd still be hesitant to stick you with the level of "you just do this" training I currently have on that.

                  The first aid kit has come to play with others I've met in the woods and on the trail or was out with more often than myself. The survival kit has gotten raided more on convenience or comfort as well on overnights it gets used as the primary source for fire starters while still keeping the other items in reserve.

                  They all weigh a pound or so each and one can fit in the back of my fishing vest without even really knowing it. At two, I feel it. Most times if I plan on covering any kind of ground I have a backpack and they toss in or strap to the outside easily and with no fuss. Worth their weight in gold when you want one.

                  My only real advice on the kits is to make the items in them dedicated solely to that kit. You start raiding them around the house and things won't have been put back when you want them. Use an item in need, replace it ASAP.

                  One thing I will say, I know some of mine may seem excessive. What happens is you encounter something that makes you think about it. You decide you should have the right gear. When you get gear you think, I should know how to use this stuff, so you get training. Once you have the knowledge, you realize how much better it is to have the gear at need, as the knowledge is good, but knowledge with the right tools is far better. For me, the defensive and medical end has become a pursuit and hobby. I'm always trying to expand the capabilities. That being said, I'd be a fool then to not actually be ready at need. I've taken red cross classes over the years and recently have taken some classes that weren't purely medical, but got into the basic application of the immediate action trauma items, I'm currently seeking a good local class for that.

                  Edited to Add- And this isn't golf. I'll admit I have a hard time as I go down this road making the call that "Ok, my defensive handgunning or my medical knowledge are "good enough".
                  Thanks for the suggestions JHP.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                    You make me sad, hft. (JK)

                    I'm with JM that if I'm out back in my stand I have nothing more than my normal pocket items, knife, flashlight, lighter, mulitool, phone, pistol and spare mag, a couple of band-aids (which live in my wallet, amazing how often I hand them to people or slap one on a kid) and duct tape, most times a tourniquet (I carry a SWAT or TK4 due to small size plus ability to work on small people's limbs, both are smaller than a pack of cigarretes to have in the pocket and I wrap duct tape around the wrapper), plus the ability to scream like a woman in distress loud enough for my nearest neighbors to hear me.

                    I keep three distinct kits in my backpack when doing most things. All of them are in a typical IFAK (Say 6" x 8" x 3")sized pouch and sometimes I'll opt out of one or the other depending on what and where I'm going. I don't take a full survival kit to sit by the lake with the kids. I won't bother carrying the first aid kit if I don't plan on being out more than a couple of hours and I'm alone. The trauma kit is generally along for the ride in any case. The first aid kit can provide comfort. The trauma kit can seriously buy you time and save you with a serious cut or GSW or slice your leg open on a tree step. It's one of those things, you take a good slice or an accidental shot somehow while hunting or fishing, there's very little in a typical first aid kit that's going to help you. Femoral bleedout can happen in under 90 seconds with loss of consciousness happening sooner. The truck just isn't close enough. Basically, the other two kits can manage anything that the first aid can do. Frankly, you don't really NEED a band-aid to walk out of the woods, but at times they're really nice to have.

                    If I'm out hunting or fishing out of sight of the truck all day, or I'm on an overnight, There's a boo-boo level first aid kit with small bandages, bandaids, guaze, tape, ointments, painkillers, scissors, knife, you get it, tossed in the bag.

                    Similarly on top of my normal pocket stuff there's a survival kit with water purification tabs, firestarters, matches, lighter, flint, e blankets, compass, whistle, mirror, chapstick, sometimes pocket hand warmer depending on the weather, small headlamp or flashlight, duct tape, safety pins a couple other odds and ends that are escaping me. There will be a water bottle and a couple of granola bars and jerky somewhere in my bag.

                    The trauma kit is a whole other animal, is the one some will judge as over the top, the only one that's never come into play, and the one I sincerely hope I never run into anyone that needs it. But if you need one, you need it RIGHT NOW. A couple of tourniquets, compressed gauze, isreali or E bandages, chest seals, Celox, Nasal airway, and a chest needle. Am seeking some training on that last presently. If you clearly have tension pneumothorax from a chest wound.. I'd still be hesitant to stick you with the level of "you just do this" training I currently have on that.

                    The first aid kit has come to play with others I've met in the woods and on the trail or was out with more often than myself. The survival kit has gotten raided more on convenience or comfort as well on overnights it gets used as the primary source for fire starters while still keeping the other items in reserve.

                    They all weigh a pound or so each and one can fit in the back of my fishing vest without even really knowing it. At two, I feel it. Most times if I plan on covering any kind of ground I have a backpack and they toss in or strap to the outside easily and with no fuss. Worth their weight in gold when you want one.

                    My only real advice on the kits is to make the items in them dedicated solely to that kit. You start raiding them around the house and things won't have been put back when you want them. Use an item in need, replace it ASAP.

                    One thing I will say, I know some of mine may seem excessive. What happens is you encounter something that makes you think about it. You decide you should have the right gear. When you get gear you think, I should know how to use this stuff, so you get training. Once you have the knowledge, you realize how much better it is to have the gear at need, as the knowledge is good, but knowledge with the right tools is far better. For me, the defensive and medical end has become a pursuit and hobby. I'm always trying to expand the capabilities. That being said, I'd be a fool then to not actually be ready at need. I've taken red cross classes over the years and recently have taken some classes that weren't purely medical, but got into the basic application of the immediate action trauma items, I'm currently seeking a good local class for that.

                    Edited to Add- And this isn't golf. I'll admit I have a hard time as I go down this road making the call that "Ok, my defensive handgunning or my medical knowledge are "good enough".
                    Trauma- Because all bleeding stops eventually.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JM View Post
                      I keep a survival type kit in my car. It was a present I received years ago...it is actually still in the shrink wrap, haha. It is both a medical and car survival kit(everything from band-aids to an ice scraper). If I am hunting and carrying a backpack than I have a basic first aid kit as well as things like an extra pair of base layers/socks. It's like a small 5x5 zip up case that I got for free. It has bandaids, gauze, tape, medications I may need, and creams for burns, etc. I then wrapped all the contents in a mosquito mask net so I always have one of those available. This is pretty much always the case when hunting on property I do not own and know well. If I am hunting on my own property than the answer is no...I usually don't really carry anything besides my phone, haha. Every boat I remember being on has had a survival kit stashed somewhere.
                      I generally carry...nothing, regardless of whether I know the property or not. I'm one of those guys that you hear about on the news after they've been rescued from some kind of predicament and think "Man, he was really dumb". Lol

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                        You make me sad, hft. (JK)

                        I'm with JM that if I'm out back in my stand I have nothing more than my normal pocket items, knife, flashlight, lighter, mulitool, phone, pistol and spare mag, a couple of band-aids (which live in my wallet, amazing how often I hand them to people or slap one on a kid) and duct tape, most times a tourniquet (I carry a SWAT or TK4 due to small size plus ability to work on small people's limbs, both are smaller than a pack of cigarretes to have in the pocket and I wrap duct tape around the wrapper), plus the ability to scream like a woman in distress loud enough for my nearest neighbors to hear me.

                        I keep three distinct kits in my backpack when doing most things. All of them are in a typical IFAK (Say 6" x 8" x 3")sized pouch and sometimes I'll opt out of one or the other depending on what and where I'm going. I don't take a full survival kit to sit by the lake with the kids. I won't bother carrying the first aid kit if I don't plan on being out more than a couple of hours and I'm alone. The trauma kit is generally along for the ride in any case. The first aid kit can provide comfort. The trauma kit can seriously buy you time and save you with a serious cut or GSW or slice your leg open on a tree step. It's one of those things, you take a good slice or an accidental shot somehow while hunting or fishing, there's very little in a typical first aid kit that's going to help you. Femoral bleedout can happen in under 90 seconds with loss of consciousness happening sooner. The truck just isn't close enough. Basically, the other two kits can manage anything that the first aid can do. Frankly, you don't really NEED a band-aid to walk out of the woods, but at times they're really nice to have.

                        If I'm out hunting or fishing out of sight of the truck all day, or I'm on an overnight, There's a boo-boo level first aid kit with small bandages, bandaids, guaze, tape, ointments, painkillers, scissors, knife, you get it, tossed in the bag.

                        Similarly on top of my normal pocket stuff there's a survival kit with water purification tabs, firestarters, matches, lighter, flint, e blankets, compass, whistle, mirror, chapstick, sometimes pocket hand warmer depending on the weather, small headlamp or flashlight, duct tape, safety pins a couple other odds and ends that are escaping me. There will be a water bottle and a couple of granola bars and jerky somewhere in my bag.

                        The trauma kit is a whole other animal, is the one some will judge as over the top, the only one that's never come into play, and the one I sincerely hope I never run into anyone that needs it. But if you need one, you need it RIGHT NOW. A couple of tourniquets, compressed gauze, isreali or E bandages, chest seals, Celox, Nasal airway, and a chest needle. Am seeking some training on that last presently. If you clearly have tension pneumothorax from a chest wound.. I'd still be hesitant to stick you with the level of "you just do this" training I currently have on that.

                        The first aid kit has come to play with others I've met in the woods and on the trail or was out with more often than myself. The survival kit has gotten raided more on convenience or comfort as well on overnights it gets used as the primary source for fire starters while still keeping the other items in reserve.

                        They all weigh a pound or so each and one can fit in the back of my fishing vest without even really knowing it. At two, I feel it. Most times if I plan on covering any kind of ground I have a backpack and they toss in or strap to the outside easily and with no fuss. Worth their weight in gold when you want one.

                        My only real advice on the kits is to make the items in them dedicated solely to that kit. You start raiding them around the house and things won't have been put back when you want them. Use an item in need, replace it ASAP.

                        One thing I will say, I know some of mine may seem excessive. What happens is you encounter something that makes you think about it. You decide you should have the right gear. When you get gear you think, I should know how to use this stuff, so you get training. Once you have the knowledge, you realize how much better it is to have the gear at need, as the knowledge is good, but knowledge with the right tools is far better. For me, the defensive and medical end has become a pursuit and hobby. I'm always trying to expand the capabilities. That being said, I'd be a fool then to not actually be ready at need. I've taken red cross classes over the years and recently have taken some classes that weren't purely medical, but got into the basic application of the immediate action trauma items, I'm currently seeking a good local class for that.

                        Edited to Add- And this isn't golf. I'll admit I have a hard time as I go down this road making the call that "Ok, my defensive handgunning or my medical knowledge are "good enough".
                        Thanks for all the info jcarlin. I must say, you sound extremely well-prepared for just about anything short of a nuclear attack, lol.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                          You make me sad, hft. (JK)

                          I'm with JM that if I'm out back in my stand I have nothing more than my normal pocket items, knife, flashlight, lighter, mulitool, phone, pistol and spare mag, a couple of band-aids (which live in my wallet, amazing how often I hand them to people or slap one on a kid) and duct tape, most times a tourniquet (I carry a SWAT or TK4 due to small size plus ability to work on small people's limbs, both are smaller than a pack of cigarretes to have in the pocket and I wrap duct tape around the wrapper), plus the ability to scream like a woman in distress loud enough for my nearest neighbors to hear me.

                          I keep three distinct kits in my backpack when doing most things. All of them are in a typical IFAK (Say 6" x 8" x 3")sized pouch and sometimes I'll opt out of one or the other depending on what and where I'm going. I don't take a full survival kit to sit by the lake with the kids. I won't bother carrying the first aid kit if I don't plan on being out more than a couple of hours and I'm alone. The trauma kit is generally along for the ride in any case. The first aid kit can provide comfort. The trauma kit can seriously buy you time and save you with a serious cut or GSW or slice your leg open on a tree step. It's one of those things, you take a good slice or an accidental shot somehow while hunting or fishing, there's very little in a typical first aid kit that's going to help you. Femoral bleedout can happen in under 90 seconds with loss of consciousness happening sooner. The truck just isn't close enough. Basically, the other two kits can manage anything that the first aid can do. Frankly, you don't really NEED a band-aid to walk out of the woods, but at times they're really nice to have.

                          If I'm out hunting or fishing out of sight of the truck all day, or I'm on an overnight, There's a boo-boo level first aid kit with small bandages, bandaids, guaze, tape, ointments, painkillers, scissors, knife, you get it, tossed in the bag.

                          Similarly on top of my normal pocket stuff there's a survival kit with water purification tabs, firestarters, matches, lighter, flint, e blankets, compass, whistle, mirror, chapstick, sometimes pocket hand warmer depending on the weather, small headlamp or flashlight, duct tape, safety pins a couple other odds and ends that are escaping me. There will be a water bottle and a couple of granola bars and jerky somewhere in my bag.

                          The trauma kit is a whole other animal, is the one some will judge as over the top, the only one that's never come into play, and the one I sincerely hope I never run into anyone that needs it. But if you need one, you need it RIGHT NOW. A couple of tourniquets, compressed gauze, isreali or E bandages, chest seals, Celox, Nasal airway, and a chest needle. Am seeking some training on that last presently. If you clearly have tension pneumothorax from a chest wound.. I'd still be hesitant to stick you with the level of "you just do this" training I currently have on that.

                          The first aid kit has come to play with others I've met in the woods and on the trail or was out with more often than myself. The survival kit has gotten raided more on convenience or comfort as well on overnights it gets used as the primary source for fire starters while still keeping the other items in reserve.

                          They all weigh a pound or so each and one can fit in the back of my fishing vest without even really knowing it. At two, I feel it. Most times if I plan on covering any kind of ground I have a backpack and they toss in or strap to the outside easily and with no fuss. Worth their weight in gold when you want one.

                          My only real advice on the kits is to make the items in them dedicated solely to that kit. You start raiding them around the house and things won't have been put back when you want them. Use an item in need, replace it ASAP.

                          One thing I will say, I know some of mine may seem excessive. What happens is you encounter something that makes you think about it. You decide you should have the right gear. When you get gear you think, I should know how to use this stuff, so you get training. Once you have the knowledge, you realize how much better it is to have the gear at need, as the knowledge is good, but knowledge with the right tools is far better. For me, the defensive and medical end has become a pursuit and hobby. I'm always trying to expand the capabilities. That being said, I'd be a fool then to not actually be ready at need. I've taken red cross classes over the years and recently have taken some classes that weren't purely medical, but got into the basic application of the immediate action trauma items, I'm currently seeking a good local class for that.

                          Edited to Add- And this isn't golf. I'll admit I have a hard time as I go down this road making the call that "Ok, my defensive handgunning or my medical knowledge are "good enough".
                          Dang, not sure what happened there. Hit Submit before I was done. I was going to say, being overly-prepared probably beats being under-prepared though. About the only thing on your lists that I generally carry is a multitool. Sometimes I'll have a flashlight or something, but I never carry any of the first aid supplies, and never any of the other survival stuff either - fire starters, water purification, etc. When I'm hunting or hiking on a hot day I'll carry water and granola bars, but not otherwise. You can see why I feel like I should be better prepared!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JM View Post
                            I keep a survival type kit in my car. It was a present I received years ago...it is actually still in the shrink wrap, haha. It is both a medical and car survival kit(everything from band-aids to an ice scraper). If I am hunting and carrying a backpack than I have a basic first aid kit as well as things like an extra pair of base layers/socks. It's like a small 5x5 zip up case that I got for free. It has bandaids, gauze, tape, medications I may need, and creams for burns, etc. I then wrapped all the contents in a mosquito mask net so I always have one of those available. This is pretty much always the case when hunting on property I do not own and know well. If I am hunting on my own property than the answer is no...I usually don't really carry anything besides my phone, haha. Every boat I remember being on has had a survival kit stashed somewhere.
                            @hft,
                            I always would carry a compass or phone(my phone has a compass). I've heard stories of people getting lost even though they were hunting on familiar property, and sometimes even property they own. Something like an injury mixed with dehydration or hypothermia will ruin your decision making and sense of direction no matter how familiar you are with the land.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JM View Post
                              I keep a survival type kit in my car. It was a present I received years ago...it is actually still in the shrink wrap, haha. It is both a medical and car survival kit(everything from band-aids to an ice scraper). If I am hunting and carrying a backpack than I have a basic first aid kit as well as things like an extra pair of base layers/socks. It's like a small 5x5 zip up case that I got for free. It has bandaids, gauze, tape, medications I may need, and creams for burns, etc. I then wrapped all the contents in a mosquito mask net so I always have one of those available. This is pretty much always the case when hunting on property I do not own and know well. If I am hunting on my own property than the answer is no...I usually don't really carry anything besides my phone, haha. Every boat I remember being on has had a survival kit stashed somewhere.
                              I've thought about that, and do sometimes carry a GPS if I'm going somewhere unfamiliar.

                              Comment

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