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Who would win the fight, a full grown raccoon or a full grown Tom feral cat?Gary

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
    During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

    Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

    That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
    JM: Yep, I should have started with shooting them. But I thought I'd approach the problem ecologically. See, the "wildlife army" idea started when a mother raccoon dragged her last two starving-to-death cubs right to my door in the middle of the day. So starved that she didn't even have enough reserves left to make milk for her cubs. (I say last 2 surviving, because most raccoons have 4 to 9 in any litter.) This is what finally alerted me to just how bad the cat-infestation had become on my lands -- the proverbial "straw". Cats had destroyed the complete food-chain, and now the wildlife were coming RIGHT TO MY DOOR in the middle of the in a desperate last-ditch effort for someone to do something about it. I nursed that raccoon and her cubs back to healthy rascals and they started me off on my "raise an army of predators" campaign. As far as diseases go, I have no qualms about anything out there in the natural world (house-cats are a man-made species, through selective breeding, and have no native habitat anywhere on earth). I grew-up close to nature. I've even drank water right out of a pond or stream while kayaking or canoeing near beaver-dams and never suffered from Giardia either. (Other canoeists and kayakers squirm when I dip the brim of my leather-hat overboard to scoop up a refreshing drink wherever I might happen to be.) But some parasitic disease coming out of a house-cat's-ass that will hijack my brain (and is now destroying all the endangered seals, otters, manatee, and even whales on all coastlines of all the world) is where I draw the line. :-)

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
      I imagine anything can happen, but from what I see and here out back, when the raccoons are around, the local kitty's are in peril.
      jearlin, the homophone transposition happens when someone is a fast typer (130+wpm here). Instead of just transposing letters, your hands end-up typing completely different but similar words to the one(s) you had intended. I blame it on muscle-memory in the arms. The signal from your brain to type the word you wanted is intercepted by the muscles in your arms that "think" (but can't think) that they know what word is coming down the line too slow for them. So they just type the "sounds like" word for you and you end-up with the wrong word glaring at you later. :-)

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by DogSong View Post
        Ha! So we've officially run out of things to talk about, huh? Like the rest of you my money is on the racoon. Have a friend who's a vet and asked his opinion on the subject. He says over the years he's treated a number of cats who've had their a$$ kicked by racoons. Those where house cats of course. If it was a feral rambo kittie, then who knows?
        JM, that's cool and just joking.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
          During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

          Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

          That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
          "huntfishtrap: Time for you to crawl out of your mommy's basement and learn about the real world instead of just being a wannabe resident-troll on hunting and fishing sites living vicariously through the lives of others and your own bambi-cartoon imagination. Your virtual-only world is obvious."
          Says the person who is obviously trolling on a hunting and fishing site... You might think you're being smart by posting this nonsense in an attempt to get us all worked up, but in reality all it's doing it giving us a good laugh. Now, I've wasted enough time on someone like you.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
            During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

            Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

            That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
            huntfishtrap: You can also get rid of vermin cats by starving them to death -- amazingly, the very same way that you can get rid of mommy's-basement-dwelling resident-trolls online who are desperate for attention. So begineth your death-by-starvation solution ....

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
              During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

              Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

              That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
              To NA, I take no offence to being called a idiot, and to that you may well be correct. However, I have in my
              years on this earth been called much worse, and that has been by people much better than what you are now
              appearing to be !!! You have stepped into the wrong arena to be throwing your bull shit. It would probably be
              better for your therapist to find you another venue to air your toxic comments !!

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                bowhunter75richard, you appear to be suffering from what most urban, cyber-reality, armchair-hunting, weekend-warriors, suffer from -- a terminal case of mommny's-basement-dwelling pavement-brain. I only proved your delusions, conspiracy-theories, and paranoia 100% wrong; now you're all butthurt because of it. Boo-hoo, too bad, so sad. Go find another pretend target for your pretend cyber-bow & cyber-arrow.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                  During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                  Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                  That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                  Ah. Nature's nature is now fully revealed. One should consider spending more time washing the orange off of one's unit from eating cheese curls and touching one's self at their computer and less time trolling websites in which one has no real interest.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                    During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                    Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                    That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                    At the risk of giving another resident-troll a snack ...

                    jearlin, the only person's nature that has been fully revealed is your very own. In how you just now managed to so succinctly project to the the whole world the kind of imagery that you entertain in your very own mind. I guess it's just your way of coming out of the closet to all of your more masculine friends. That's okay, I won't tell anyone -- I don't have to, you manage to tell them all by your little self without even realizing it.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                      During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                      Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                      That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                      Hmm. I will not have to reevaluate myself in light of this revelation.
                      eh.. we're done here.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                        During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                        Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                        That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                        NA, you strike me as one who enjoys exposing yourself, so in order to give you a chance, why don't you post some pictures of yourself making love to your coons ? If we don't see any, we will take it that you are too ashamed of
                        your favorite activity, btw which any normal person would be, but that should not be a problem for you !!

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                          During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                          Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                          That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                          Don't feed the troll, guys. It's not worth it.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                            During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                            Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                            That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                            Agreed.
                            Though admittedly I did spend an hour this morning grappling with large men.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                              During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                              Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                              That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                              Man. Noone's going to whack that softball out of the park?

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Nature Advocate View Post
                                During a period of time when my lands were being infested by vermin invasive-species cats for nearly two decades, I spent quite a few years helping the native predator populations to increase in numbers (at one point I counted as many as 60 assorted native predators in my yard some nights). Using them as my wildlife army to oust the invasive species vermin cats. I learned (and am still learning) much about the behavior of wild raccoons. Some of them to this day still bring their cubs around during whelping season to show them off to me, or pawn their kids off on me for a day or two to get a much needed break from their little woodland terrorists. Their kids playing tug-o'-war with my bootlaces as the mother will lay belly-up alongside me snoring away. (Then I don't see them again until next year.)

                                Doesn't matter the size of the cat, a raccoon will win hands-down every time. They are some of the toughest (and smartest) wildlife on the N. American continent. I've seen them fall from a tree 40 feet up (during a fight in a tree with another raccoon) with half their face torn-off and after landing with a loud thud climb back up the tree to continue on in their fight. I swear, that when they get into these squabbles, that if someone was out by the dirt-road at night listening to the screeching and growling going on back here in the woods, someone would think that I'm torturing a dozen animals to death. LOL (They still respect me for some reason though and have never challenged me, even if I take their food away from their plate while they are eating. (Well, one did just one time, but that was solved with a hefty whap upside its head with a food-pan.) They've been more respectful than some dogs I've owned. Some so gentle (when they want to be) that they'd even want to hold my hand with a paw while they eat, or as I tweak their nose while they eat, just for fun. These are completely wild raccoons, mind you.)

                                That being said, there's something that even a full-grown adult raccoon will not dare take-on. During the development of yearling raccoons, there comes a time when a litter of them outgrow the needs of being around their female parent. But they also aren't sure enough of the world to face it alone. So they form "gangs" with their siblings. I call it their "juvenile delinquent" phase. Not even a full-grown alpha raccoon will dare take-on one of these packs of roving juvenile-delinquent gangs. I've seen a pack of these juvenile raccoons chase every last one of 20-30 adult raccoons out of my yard just to show them who's boss. The adults don't even think about challenging them back.
                                Yeah, I guess jcarlin, the one's I grappled with were a little too large for me. As soon as I pushed the
                                submit button I knew I had been overtaken ! My apologies to the site !

                                Comment

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