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how do you get over flinching?

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  • how do you get over flinching?

    how do you get over flinching?

  • #2
    my uncle taught me by not letting me see whether he put in an empty or a full cartridge. this meant thata i would not know if my gun would shoot and it was vry weird when it didnt but greatly helped me. also try using a lead sled or a another recoil reducer such as reduced loads or muzzlebreaks.

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    • #3
      The usual advice is to stay focused. The question is focus on what!! The key is to have something to focus on specifically. The military guys will be better schooled in techniques but the standard is to focus on your breathing. Concentrate on your breathing, take a deep breath as you bear on the target.. release the breathe slowly as if to calm and steady yourself. Take a shallow breathe and squeeze the trigger holding on target. Concentrating on 'not flinching' is a lost cause. Rather, concentrate on fundamentals and don't pull the trigger until such time as you have maintained focus. Controlling your breathing is a good starting point. Make sure other matters are in order as well, stance, your posture and position of the rifle in various shooting styles. The point is that the trigger is one aspect of the skill, pay attention to the details that lead up to pulling the trigger and you will find yourself better disposed to shooting without a flinch.
      All that being said, if I get smacked on the cheek by not paying attention I am hard pressed not to flinch on the next shot.

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      • #4
        I have used the same technique with a friend of mine that Taylor1 has mentioned about using empty and loaded ammo. It is also a good way to see if somebody is doing anything else that might make them a bad shooter... pushing the shoulder into the stock, pulling the gun to the right or left, jerking the trigger, etc. anticipating the gun going off. Going back to shooting a rifle that shoots .22 Long Rifle is helpful; low report and nil recoil. Use a recoil pad like Pachmayr Decelerator, a Past recoil shield or both in combination when practicing shooting.

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        • #5
          All of the above have good points. As Johnnie said, if it is with a rifle, going back to the basic with a .22 is the best way to develop the right habits. Sometimes, if it because the gun kicks just enough, you need to get rid of the gun. I broke my nose on a rifle many years ago and I could not pick it up without my eyes watering to badly to see the target. It is too long a story to explain how it happened. I had to get rid of the gun.
          If you are shooting a handgun, particularly a revolver, fill every other with alive cartridge and spin the cylinder. That will tell you how much you are flinching. I shoot a Smith 629 classic hunter,(.44 Mag) When I haven't shot it in awhile I load every other, just to check myself. If I jerk on an empty case, I know I need to work on technique.
          As Kody said, "Concentrating on 'not flinching' is a lost cause" The more you think about it the more you will do it, even if you are thinking about not doing it. Whatever you are focusing on the most is what you will do, even if you are focusing on what you don't want. Cruel law of nature, I know, but it is true.

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          • #6
            Like others have said, concentration is the key to me not flinching. I start with my breathing and finish with concentrating on keeping my eye on the target. You kinda forget you are looking through a scope and then you just squeeze the trigger. It works for me.

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            • #7
              1. Get a good set of ear plugs or ear muffs, maybe both.
              2. Get out your 22 and practice a lot. 22 ammo is still cheap.
              3. Stay away from neighbors at the gun range, especially those shooting the big bores.
              4. Do not hunker over your gun on a bench rest any more than is absolutely necessary. You feel recoil much more when you do this.
              5. Be surprised when the hammer falls.

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              • #8
                Like others said, always wear ear protection, the loud bang can actually create a flinch. also squeeze the trigger slowly so that when the gun fires it a suprise. both of those will help, but as a 20 plus year hunter safety and shooting indtructor a bad flinch is very hard to cure. also shoot small light recoil firearms for a while.

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