Top Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do you consider food plots to be ethical and Different, than baiting game with a bucket of corn for example? In some states, it

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Do you consider food plots to be ethical and Different, than baiting game with a bucket of corn for example? In some states, it

    Do you consider food plots to be ethical and Different, than baiting game with a bucket of corn for example? In some states, it is legal to plant corn , then mow it over and hunt over it, while at the same time, throwing a bucket of corn out is illegal. What if you hunted on public land and the property close to where you hunt has a food plot in the middle of his (for example) 400 acre turf? Would you consider that privatizing the game?

  • #2
    I've been hunting deer on food plots for over 40 years and plan to continue. Different from baiting?---I think it's a matter of degree. Is hunting an oak ridge that was left out of a timber cut hunting over bait? Etc., etc., etc.

    I sure do like hunting deer from a blind on a food plot in which I can move around to relieve the pressure on my defective old back, and I can't do that from a tree stand.

    Comment


    • #3
      I do not consider food plots to be the same as baiting, although as pineywoods said, it can be a matter of degrees. The big difference to me is that most food plots do more than just give you an advantage while hunting. They provide valuable food and sometimes cover to many game and non-game animals for several months of the year, both when you're hunting and when you aren't. While hunting over a pile of corn, for example, is usually a short-term proposition, and doesn't really benefit wildlife that much. And food plots aren't the sure-thing hunting strategy that some opponents would have you believe - there usually is nothing forcing your quarry to come out within range or during shooting light. Whereas hunting over bait, when you control the amount and timing of the feed, especially timed feeders, is much closer to an unfair advantage, in my mind.

      Comment


      • #4
        While I am not a deer hunter, I think anything that benefits wildlife is a plus. Food plots provide for more than just deer and again it is not a guarantee to filling a deer tag. Just a poor old squirrel hunter's opinion.

        Comment


        • #5
          It MIGHT be helpful to the environment to plant food plots. But look at it this way. Food plots are not natural, whether by differences food species or by concentration of the food. There are no regulations on the size of a plot and most will be managed up until the end of the season, which was the initial intent of the food plot. Food plots can just draw too big of a concentration of wildlife which can cause many problems. Predators will eventually catch wind of this hot spot and wildlife will deplete the surrounding vegetation, and once winter hits, that could kill too much wildlife.

          Comment


          • #6
            It MIGHT be helpful to the environment to plant food plots. But look at it this way. Food plots are not natural, whether by differences food species or by concentration of the food. There are no regulations on the size of a plot and most will be managed up until the end of the season, which was the initial intent of the food plot. Food plots can just draw too big of a concentration of wildlife which can cause many problems. Predators will eventually catch wind of this hot spot and wildlife will deplete the surrounding vegetation, and once winter hits, that could kill too much wildlife.

            Comment


            • #7
              Didn't mean to double post And food plots don't necessarily provide wildlife with great cover. It depends what the hunter plants and how it is managed. Planting a plot means taking out a piece of natural land and turning into something else. Vegetation only last so long and once its gone there is no cover left but lots of wildlife in the surrounding area.

              Comment


              • #8
                A food plot in my opinion is just a very complex and planned out bait site. No where near on the same level as dumping a bag of corn, but no different than sitting over an apple orchard or corn field. The only differences with sitting over food/bait is that some you take the time to find, some are agricultural, some you put there.

                Comment


                • #9
                  MNwhitetailHunter, I get your point, but then how do food plots differ from crop fields? Both are a variation from the area's natural habitat, both could conceivably cause wildlife to form unnatural patterns, and neither are not year-round affairs (most places). Yet I don't know of a single person who thinks it's unethical to hunt over a crop field.
                  And in my part of the country, most food plots consist of corn and/or soybeans, so they are in effect mini-crop fields, only they aren't harvested in early fall, so they actually benefit wildlife more than ordinary crop fields do.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I would say hunting on a farm field is different because you are in an area where most of the property is converted to farm field and so are the surrounding properties. There is no sweet spot because every property is alike (generally speaking). If farmers didn't hunt and just let the wildlife eat their crop, which was made to make money and not attract deer, they would be losing money. You are right to point out that every part of the country is different, bringing along different situations. Can food plots and farm fields negatively impact the wildlife in a way? Yes, but I’m not suggesting we stop either because they both have a problem. Nothing is perfect and there is too many variables for a quick easy answer, but whatever side you are on; for baiting, for food plots, for hunting, etc.. Or against them, it is worth bringing up both sides so we are not ignorant and stupid.... like PETA. Me personally, I don't care if someone plants a food plot or not. They definitely have some benefits. But hey, if you want to keep this debate going, I’ll still debate for the other side!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      like bows are to guns so is the question of food plots,it depends on how you want to hunt and to raising the odds in your favor, young hunters and handi capped hunters have a better chance , others may just prefer seeing more game animals. probably not to many still hunters hunt over bait piles.what might be ethical in one circumstance may not be in another.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If baiting deer or bear is within the guidelines of the state fish and game laws then I considerate that hunting under fair chase.

                        I not am waiting for wild game to pass by my tree stand while every Joe-Six-Pack in the forest is baiting around me. I am not anybody fool and it doesn’t fill my freezer.

                        I submit a photo this past December in the Outdoor Life Bragging Room called “Heavy Weights” showing two four hundred pound black bears eating at my bait pile on opening day of the New Jersey bear season. I hunted that same location from a high tree stand that same day. The big burins were nocturnal and they came into my bait pile at 7 pm in the total darkness. My trail camera got the time and date. Big bucks also move at night when hitting on bait piles. Don’t ever think baiting game is like “stealing candy from a baby” because it is not.

                        Comment

                        Welcome!

                        Collapse

                        Welcome to Outdoor Life's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Outdoor Life, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                        If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                        And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on outdoorlife.com.

                        Right Rail 1 Ad

                        Collapse

                        Top Active Users

                        Collapse

                        There are no top active users.

                        Right Rail 2 Ad

                        Collapse

                        Latest Topics

                        Collapse

                        Right Rail 3 Ad

                        Collapse

                        Footer Ad Widget

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X