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I am interested in Backpack Hunting on public land in MI. Maybe plan 2-3 overnights. Any reccomendations on what to bring (Gea

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  • I am interested in Backpack Hunting on public land in MI. Maybe plan 2-3 overnights. Any reccomendations on what to bring (Gea

    I am interested in Backpack Hunting on public land in MI. Maybe plan 2-3 overnights. Any reccomendations on what to bring (Gear lists/haul everything in and out/including a whitetail)? Use of a sled or game cart? (minimalist?/lightweight?)

  • #2
    Assuming you are experianced in hunting and camping...... you could take a large pack for a "base camp" and a small day pack for your daily hunting/survival needs. It sounds like you haven't tried this before and I wouldn't go light my first time until I had some experiance. Carry heavy to a good base camp, then strike out light from there to hunt. I have tried many fire starters and have had great success with the Blast Match- take 3 butane lighters + blast match, Fiskers makes an excellent hatchet for backpacking, water filter/treatment, and I have found that Immodeium Anti diarreha meds can be a life saver on backpacking trips. Try http://www.backpacking.net/cheklist.html

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    • #3
      I have been hunting for the past 4 years on family property in lower MI and would like to venture out into Manistee National Forest in the future. I have been backpacking also for few years and camping for a long time.

      All input in apprecated!

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      • #4
        I do the same thing on public land in the LP. Not including layered clothing which can be removed and lashed to the outside of the pack, my gear list includes a tarp shelter (which is really just the rain fly from an old dome tent), a 10-degree mummy bag, Nesbit stove & tablets, lighter & backup mag stick, Wyoming Saw & Knife, folding knife, headlamp, small first aid kit, soap & cloth, toothbrush & paste, deodorant, aluminum boy scout cookset, folding spork, ramen noodles, beef jerky, 2 water bottles & iodine tablets, allen wrench, compass, map, compact binocs, bow w/ attached quiver, extra long john pants & socks, small notebook & pencil, and lots of paracord (hopefully for lashing buck to pole). All this (except the bow) fits into a small internal frame pack which isn't too cumbersome to also serve as a daypack. 23 is right about setting a basecamp. I'd go as light as you're comfortable with from previous backpacking trips, since you may be hauling back a deer. If you haven't been backpacking much, you may also want to add a light 3-5 lb tent and a sleeping pad for comfort, a GPS, and a cannister stove. Make sure you know the territory before you strike out into the national forest for a backpack hunt. That basecamp can be hard to find after a day out hunting if you're not careful. Good luck!

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        • #5
          I have to assume you're experienced and you know what you're getting into. If not, I would strongly suggest you bring along a hunting buddy. It'll make the work that much easier if there are two of you. As mentioned previously, obviously, there is a very real possibility you're going to be packing out the meat of a full grown whitetail deer.

          That means, we're talking about your base camp supplies, your hunting gear and a packed animal. That's not going to be an easy feat by any means.

          The best advice I can give is do not scrimp on your shelter, your sleeping bag or a good first aid kit. Everything else will fall into place assuming you're an experienced outdoorsman and/or avid camper.

          Best of luck to you this season and enjoy your time in the woods! Be safe!

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          • #6
            AMMo is correct, take a hunting buddy if you can, not only to share work, but if you get injuried there is someone to go for help. By all means, get a topo map and get a general idea of where you want to go. Mark it on a second map and leave with a friend or relative along with when you should return and instructions to call for help if your are not back by a certain time. When you strike out from base camp to hunt, leave an arrow of large logs pointing your direction of travel, maybe even a note saying when you left. I am a FireFighter and EMT in a rural area (Wayne National Forest in Ohio) It will help rescue teams should you get injuried and can't make it back. I am not saying lost, becuase nobody "plans" to get lost. But if you "plan on getting injuried" before you strike out for the day,it can relly shorten the time your stuck out there. By plan I mean carry a good first aid kit, a good emergency blanket and fire and signalling supplies. Leave clues to your location, arrows of stones or logs, broken branches etc. Our woods are full of flagging ribbon, so as a rescuer its hard to tell whats yours or somebody elses. But if I find a freshly broken branch I am going to look closer for your boot prints.Do this especially if you make a drastic change of direction.

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            • #7



              Hi...



              Some good advice mentioned here. I urge you to pay particular attention to your survival gear...MUCH better to be prepared than to be tomorrow's front page story (hey, it doesn't ALWAYS happen to the OTHER guy).


              Extra rations, first aid AND trauma gear, fire making tools, water or a means to get/purify it, shelter, and clothing for ANY type of severe weather you'll be liable to encounter in your area, a good topo map w/good compass...and better make sure you know how to use the compass and topo first.

              Regarding lighters, yes, carry two or three...but NOT the kind with a see-through reservoir...these cheapos I have had fail from between six to twelve turns of the spark wheel...!!

              And ALWAYS tell others where you will be going, and your cell phone number and carrier.

              Comment

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