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whats the longest trailing job after the shot accomplished by your self or with friends ?with or without snow

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  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
    A deer hit in a vital will always die; it may take days or weeks but the animal has a death sentence. Seeing it later does not mean it survives long term that is why it is so important to take the best shots only.
    Practice tracking skills constantly you'll get better and remember these skills are perishable. So practice.
    Mix corn syrup with red food color have a hunting buddy lay out a trail for you to decode. Then do it for him, make a contest of it. Great off season fun.
    Good hunting.
    later,
    charlie
    Hmmm, I wonder if my daughter has the skills to track. That would be good practice.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
    That's good Smitty keep working on your tracking skills. Tracking is becoming a lost art it will take young men like you to keep it alive.
    It is very rare to meet a hunter who takes a deer by tracking any more. Most say it is impossible but that is selling themselves short - like putting a limit on developing their abilities.
    I am on a list of trackers in the local area, when a deer needs to be found or a lost person we are the ones they turn to. If there is a list of trackers in your area you should volunteer. Contact your game warden to check.
    later,
    charlie
    I haven't thought about volunteering to help track. Thanks for the idea!

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by Hntrb View Post
    I unfortunately one-lunged a doe with my bow a few years back. I knew the shot was high and let her lay for a while. After 3/4 of a mile through thick Upper Peninsula Michigan brush/swamp we found her, with a pack of coyotes already enjoying my kill. I have never been more frustrated in my life. I did help a friend trail a buck for about a 1 1/2 miles through the same swamp and we were not able to recover the buck. On on a good note, he had the deer on trail cam a few days later!
    It's amazing how fast the predators arrive. The coyotes in my area leave nothing behind after a few days.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
    When hunters have a bad trail to follow I am one of the guys they call for help. The worst or longest; 3.12 miles that according to a GPS. It was a frontal shot the hunter got too excited to wait for it to turn and fearing it would get away - shot. The arrow went in between the shoulder the ribs with the broadhead penetrating between a couple of ribs about an inch, just enough to cut one lung.
    There was no snow, took 2 and half days including long nights of trailing, with a light misty rain plus we had to get permission to access several pieces of private property.
    After all that the deer circled back and expired within 80 yards of the shot.
    Meat was good and the hunter turned happy vowing to never shot the frontal again.
    later,
    charlie
    Once again a good story Charlie. And a good lesson.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by pjsabella View Post
    Mine was the same as piney...about a mile that ended in a deerless track. But the good thing was that I saw the doe the following week and it was fine. Hit it right below the spine and right above any vitals.
    I've heard of that possibility and think that's what happened to my wife's first deer. I saw it go down but then when we checked it was gone. We determined the shot must have been like you described.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by MNwhitetailHunter View Post
    killing the deer where it stands is easier than tracking it. shoot to kill.
    Doesn't always happen like that, but I wish it did!

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by Treestand View Post
    Never...one shot..one kill,use the right caliber and ammo with good shot placement...no need to track
    As a youngster I was given one round to hunt with make it count or come home with that round,the gun was a Savage M99-250/3000..W/peep sight.That was back in the war days...It still holds true to this day.
    Great points Treestand.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    I've trailed a pig over 500 yards before losing the blood trail. But, my longest recovery on a deer was over 200 yards. My brother has started using his dog to track wounded deer. Very effective!

    Leave a comment:


  • Smitty18
    replied
    Charlie,
    I find even tracking down a deer and not harvesting it to be nearly as much fun as getting one from a treestand. There are some areas where i hunt that leave me no choice but to hang out in my stand and i do for love of hunting but my heart belongs to the thick grape vines and brushy creek bottoms spread amongst the forest. I have never spent the night on a track but it sounds like fun. Unfortunatly it will have to wait for next summer due to the end of my summer break ending next wednesday. School and work take up a lot of time that should be spent in the woods.

    Leave a comment:


  • charlie elk
    replied
    That is some good hunting Smitty18, keep it up. If you have not read about the Benoit's legendary hunting by tracking skills - You will find this must reading. Larry Benoit may be the greatest deer hunter in all of North America EVER!
    I was very fortunate to come of age among hunters who tracked in an era of vast open lands. Cut my deer hunting teeth in the tamarack swamps and birch points from Woodland - Red Top - Isle to McGregor, MN. Also learned how to spend nights alone in those swamps in order to not lose the track. A skilled tracker can bring the biggest bucks to ground.
    Due to all manner of development there are fewer places to hunt in this manner....
    Reducing most modern hunters into stand sitters.
    later,
    charlie

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    Never...one shot..one kill,use the right caliber and ammo with good shot placement...no need to track
    As a youngster I was given one round to hunt with make it count or come home with that round,the gun was a Savage M99-250/3000..W/peep sight.That was back in the war days...It still holds true to this day.

    Leave a comment:


  • MNwhitetailHunter
    replied
    killing the deer where it stands is easier than tracking it. shoot to kill.

    Leave a comment:


  • the decoy hunter
    replied
    probably a couple mile loop that went over a beaver dam at one point....there was snow on the ground so the the tracking was easy....but a wild job through some pretty rough back country and swamp....the big buck was shot in the front leg and made a complete circle....finally pinned the buck that my friend had shot.... just near where the first shot was fired.....saved dragging him out over that beaver dam....it would have been a day long job to get him out

    Leave a comment:


  • Smitty18
    replied
    Charlie,
    My all time favorite way to take a deer is by tracking them and using my flintlock. To practice and sharpen my skill i track deer during the summer. It is fun and interesting way to practice and scout. I tracked down a nice 6 point bout two weeks ago. I managed to follow him about a half mile up a crick bed and through a stand of oaks before i found him sleeping through the mid day heat in a grape vine thicket. He was completely unaware that i was standing less than 10 yards from him!! As for people tracking, I have thankfully never been called upon but I am "on call" for search and rescue.

    Leave a comment:


  • buckhunter
    replied
    My brother in law shot a buck in the back legs cutting both tendons. The buck dragged his back legs for about a mile before coming to rest on a creek back. After a fine stalking job my brother in law was able to put an arrow in the vitals. A very nice 158 inch buck.

    Leave a comment:

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