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whats the longest trailing job after the shot accomplished by your self or with friends ?with or without snow

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  • whats the longest trailing job after the shot accomplished by your self or with friends ?with or without snow

    whats the longest trailing job after the shot accomplished by your self or with friends ?with or without snow

  • #2
    My longest trailing job was just at a mile. Unfortunately, the trail ended at a deep creek and we never recovered the buck. There was no snow, but there was enough blood to keep it from being too bad a job.

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    • #3
      Mine was the same as piney...about a mile that ended in a deerless track. But the good thing was that I saw the doe the following week and it was fine. Hit it right below the spine and right above any vitals.

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      • #4
        The longest successful track was 118 yards on a gut shot button buck. There was no snow and very little blood but it was my little brothers first deer with the bow. Dad gave up on it but i put off climbing into the stand the next day to keep looking. After 30 yards of crawling through rabbit trails i found it. The farthest unsuccessful track was about a mile. One of our guys hit it a tad forward and missed the vitals. Good news is that he shot it a couple days later. That time he got it in the head with the flintlock.

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        • #5
          Unfortunately all of the longest tracking jobs I've been a part of were unsuccessful. The longest one was a big buck that my brother hit about 3 years ago, we never figured out exactly where he hit it, although it was somewhere in the body cavity. because it looked like a good hit at the time, and there was blood sprayed all over the snow where the arrow was sticking in the ground, but we trailed the thing for 2.5 miles before finally loosing it. He first bedded down about 200 yards from the stand, and thinking it was a good hit we came back the same evening, only to discover three bloody beds and coyote tracks everywhere. After being jumped by the 'yotes he ran, flat out, a full mile, first down a big hill and then right down the middle of a big creek bottom. He was never bleeding profusely, but he was bleeding steadily, just a moderate spatter the whole way. He then slowed to a trot for maybe another half mile before bedding down within 200 yards of a house, in plain sight. He must have stayed there a long time, as there was a good two inches of crimson ice lining the bed. After leaving there, he then walked farther up the creek bottom for a ways before turning and heading back up into the hills, where we finally lost him, but not before finding three more bloody beds about halfway up a hill. We never have been able to figure out how he made it that far.

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          • #6
            When hunters have a bad trail to follow I am one of the guys they call for help. The worst or longest; 3.12 miles that according to a GPS. It was a frontal shot the hunter got too excited to wait for it to turn and fearing it would get away - shot. The arrow went in between the shoulder the ribs with the broadhead penetrating between a couple of ribs about an inch, just enough to cut one lung.
            There was no snow, took 2 and half days including long nights of trailing, with a light misty rain plus we had to get permission to access several pieces of private property.
            After all that the deer circled back and expired within 80 yards of the shot.
            Meat was good and the hunter turned happy vowing to never shot the frontal again.
            later,
            charlie

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            • #7
              Charlie,
              I may be young but i am one of the best trackers that our group of guys knows. I am 8 for 10 out of trails i got called in to follow after the others started to lose hope.

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              • #8
                I unfortunately one-lunged a doe with my bow a few years back. I knew the shot was high and let her lay for a while. After 3/4 of a mile through thick Upper Peninsula Michigan brush/swamp we found her, with a pack of coyotes already enjoying my kill. I have never been more frustrated in my life. I did help a friend trail a buck for about a 1 1/2 miles through the same swamp and we were not able to recover the buck. On on a good note, he had the deer on trail cam a few days later!

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                • #9
                  That's good Smitty keep working on your tracking skills. Tracking is becoming a lost art it will take young men like you to keep it alive.
                  It is very rare to meet a hunter who takes a deer by tracking any more. Most say it is impossible but that is selling themselves short - like putting a limit on developing their abilities.
                  I am on a list of trackers in the local area, when a deer needs to be found or a lost person we are the ones they turn to. If there is a list of trackers in your area you should volunteer. Contact your game warden to check.
                  later,
                  charlie

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                  • #10
                    A deer hit in a vital will always die; it may take days or weeks but the animal has a death sentence. Seeing it later does not mean it survives long term that is why it is so important to take the best shots only.
                    Practice tracking skills constantly you'll get better and remember these skills are perishable. So practice.
                    Mix corn syrup with red food color have a hunting buddy lay out a trail for you to decode. Then do it for him, make a contest of it. Great off season fun.
                    Good hunting.
                    later,
                    charlie

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                    • #11
                      Luckily for the deer but not for my friend, the shot he made was not a vital shot. He took a little meat off it but just grazed the shoulder blade! I agree with Charlie, ethical shots are of utmost importance! I've never heard of practicing tracking like that..good concept though!

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                      • #12
                        When following a difficult trail, I jab a stick with a peice of marking tape at the last spot I find sign. That way, I have an easily seen reminder to view while I circle looking for more.
                        We tracked a deer my friend shot poorly for about 1/2 mile after leaving for 4 hours to let it bleed out or at least stiffen up. After tracking for two hours, we found it bedded not 50 yards from where I parked. If I had gotten out and looked down,instead of starting at the last place we saw the deer, I would have seen a drop of blood and a hoof print and could have saved two hours of work!

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                        • #13
                          No snow, two miles for a 90-lb Texas whitetail doe... whole lotta work!

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                          • #14
                            My brother in law shot a buck in the back legs cutting both tendons. The buck dragged his back legs for about a mile before coming to rest on a creek back. After a fine stalking job my brother in law was able to put an arrow in the vitals. A very nice 158 inch buck.

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                            • #15
                              Charlie,
                              My all time favorite way to take a deer is by tracking them and using my flintlock. To practice and sharpen my skill i track deer during the summer. It is fun and interesting way to practice and scout. I tracked down a nice 6 point bout two weeks ago. I managed to follow him about a half mile up a crick bed and through a stand of oaks before i found him sleeping through the mid day heat in a grape vine thicket. He was completely unaware that i was standing less than 10 yards from him!! As for people tracking, I have thankfully never been called upon but I am "on call" for search and rescue.

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