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CWD has now been found in MN, in fact not too far from where I hunt. I am wondering, being new to this dilemma, do hunters still

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  • CWD has now been found in MN, in fact not too far from where I hunt. I am wondering, being new to this dilemma, do hunters still

    CWD has now been found in MN, in fact not too far from where I hunt. I am wondering, being new to this dilemma, do hunters still hunt in areas with CWD? And if they do do they get all their deer tested or do they simply not worry about it because as scientists claim, there is no known harm to humans who eat CWD deer? Anybody hunt in these areas?

  • #2
    I would get it checked and be sure to cook it to guideline temps.
    An update for PA hunters, i just read that all of the elk killed this year were CWD FREE!!

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    • #3
      There is some good stuff on line. It is going to depend alot on how the MN DNR approaches it and does further study. There are no documented cases of it passing to humans either by consumption or through body fluids.

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      • #4
        Hunt in CWD zones; as matter of fact it seems an obligation. The goal of the herd reduction areas is to put more space between animals in order to slow the spread. This goes for areas not infected yet too. Herd numbers need to be reduced.

        Fortunately all evidence points to a species barrier meaning CWD cannot infect carnivores including humans. So testing your deer before consuming is unnecessary.
        That being said I think there are prudent things to do preparing the meat for consumption. Fillet the meat from the bones. Particularity the spine you should avoid spilling fluid on the meat. Cut the lymph nodes out. If you once made stock from the bones discontinue this practice.
        The prion that causes CWD can not be destroyed by cooking or with any chemical. The U of W study found the prion survived after infected deer were cremated. It survives in the soil for decades so this is going to be something we have to live with for years to come.
        later,
        charlie

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        • #5
          This was just brought to my attention. Very bad news. A new research paper published
          Jan 5, 2011 - "Generation of a new form of human PrPSc in vitro by inter-species transmission from cervids prions" http://www.jbc.org/content/early/2011/01/04/jbc.M110.198465.long
          Before we panic more research is required but scientific thinking that there is no species barrier as originally thought due to mutating prions is very discomforting.
          later,
          charlie

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          • #6
            Thanks for all the responses. Yes that is scary Charlie. As much as we might think we know about all these diseases that are out there the fact is there is a lot we don't know. Scientists saying to not worry about it doesn't really put me at ease. Pretty sure if I hunt in these areas I will have all my deer tested and toss out positive tested deer. Also do my own butchering. Maybe I'm paranoid but that CJD is scary stuff. Better to be safe than sorry. Anybody else have opinions on this?

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            • #7
              I'm also curious as to the situation in S.W. Wisconsinn. Since CWD broke out there have people abandoned the area to hunt elsewhere and has the herd increased or is it the same? What did the DNR do there in response to CWD? I will do some on line research but am curious as to the thoughts of hunters familiar with that area.

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              • #8
                The population in Wisconsin has dropped dramatically, and the DNR wants it to drop more. They allow for 4 free tags a day in the CWD zone and for every doe you shoot you can shoot a buck. The season is also extended to land owners and they also have a "holiday" gun hunt in the CWD zone. This has caused a dramatic drop in the doe herd and I saw very few fawns this year. The drop in doe numbers does allow for an increase in buck sightings (especially mature bucks) but i don't know how long the population will hold with the drop in breeding does. I personally don't like this extreme harvest and seasons, but the "experts" say it needs to be done. I just hope they are right.

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                • #9
                  Ontario has just released the CWD test results for the year 2010....all tests to date have been negative within all regions of the province and the MNR has been monitoring the deer herd for CWD for ten years now.

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                  • #10
                    Good info guys! Up here in Saskatchewan we have certain areas where CWD has been found and the "experts" deemed it necessary to have extreme harvests. These zones now contain very few deer and the evidence of eradicating CWD is circumstantial at best. Trying to keep the disease contained to a certain area is also a bunch of bollocks. About 10 years ago the fellows at Sask. Environment were doing a migration study on whitetails here in the province and a doe was collared at Kenosee during the summer, that fall she was harvested near Rapid City, SD. Google earth it to see how far that is if your bored. Now consider how many deer are going to be pushed out of an area with such an increase in hunting pressure, not to mention that CWD can live in the soil that has been in contact with an infected cervid.

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                    • #11
                      Crazy Canuck, 530 miles from summer to fall? Would like to get an actual number of days and do the math to find out how many miles a day average she traveled. Do you know? I had no idea they migrated like that?

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