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i recently ask a question about wether or nor a 30-06 would kill a bear or mountain lion - we lease 20,000 acres from a local lo

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  • i recently ask a question about wether or nor a 30-06 would kill a bear or mountain lion - we lease 20,000 acres from a local lo

    i recently ask a question about wether or nor a 30-06 would kill a bear or mountain lion - we lease 20,000 acres from a local logging company to graze cattle on, most of it it pine plantations, clear cuts and a few rocky hills with ledge rocks and holes going back under them, im going to try to ride a horse around it this year, my 30-06 is new & i dont want to mess it up, but i have a .32 winchester special and a 30/30 what do you recomend (with out getting another gun)

  • #2
    With the restrictions you have given, you don’t want to beat up your new 06’, and you want to potentially be able to shoot a bear, none of your rifles are a good idea. The .30-06 with premium bullets and modern powder in factory loads would be alright for a black bear if the shooter does his part, and the .30-30 would be fine for mountain lions but it’s by no means a bear rifle. The .32 Winchester Special is so obsolete it’s not a contender, and if it were it would be in the same boat as the .30-30; fine for cats, unacceptable for bear. A good saddle scabbard will protect your 06’ somewhat but no matter what you do horseback you’re going to be exposing your rifle to a lot of potential harm. I hope you are able to decide what to do as far as your rifle decision goes but whatever you do don’t shoot a bear with your .30-30.

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    • #3
      I don't know what Remington Metricis talking about.
      The 30-06 will take down any north american game animal. It will have no [problem on a black bear or mtn lion. The only issue is the potential for damage being in a scabbard on horseback. The 30-30 will also easily kill a bear.

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      • #4
        I have a problem using a .30-30 on bear. I admit that I am not a fan of that caliber. I have seen multiple deer which when wounded by a poorly placed shot, fled to die a slow death, to be discovered several days later when the meat could not be salvaged. Bears are a bit more dangerous and the last thing you want to do is just irritate him. When the brown stuff hits the fan, particularly with a bear you got to have enough gun to stop the argument in as short time as possible.If you are charged by a bear, you will have a very hard time making a well placed shot.

        If you doubt this, ask any cop who has been in a shooting, or any veteran with combat time. First time is hardest and usually when you find out whether you have the right training. Studies of Police shootings over many years have been able to eliminate many of the bad habits the police trainers had not identified prior to the incidents. Same with the military, The training given to the current crop of GI's is very different than what guys of my vintage received.

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        • #5
          The 30-06 is enough rife for anything on the North American continent, providing your are proficient with it, and use the proper ammo. As far as beating it up: a well made and quality saddle scabbard will protect a scoped firearm just fine, use the type with the flip back hood and reinforced aluminum backing. It's only a few pounds heavier that the straight leather one and will take even a horse rolling on it (speaking from experience).

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          • #6
            30-06 if fine, i would use Remington cor-lokt 180gr

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            • #7
              I would go with the 06. Maybe you should look into getting a synthetic stock for it. I know when I buy a gun it's going to get some scratches and dings on it, it was bought to use not for show.

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              • #8
                Ok, I have to put in my two cents. I agree with Remingtom Metic for one simple reason, I just shot large black bear twice with my 30-06 using Winchester Supreme Elite XP3 Centerfire Ammo - .30-06 - 180 Grain (about the best rounds you can get) and lost the bear. Now, before everyone chimes in to say I just can't shoot let me address that. The bear was at 30 yards and I drilled him in the vitals (TWICE). He stampered off and we lost him. My buddy and I searched for four hours and did not find him. Factors, (1) it was a big bear (2) very close range. I did not go for a head shot just because I did want the trophy, but two shots and no bear.... never again. Maybe it was the ammo, maybe the bear had a bullet proof vest, either way, two shots and no bear. No as I read on some of the other comments I have to say, I am sure a 30-06 or 30-30 is enough gun to do the job, but is it enough gun to stop him in his tracks without a head shot? I am sure there is a dead bear out there becasue of me but never again will I hunt an animal that could potentialy finish me before I finish him. Hope my post helps.

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                • #9
                  I have said it before and will said it again, I am not a fan of the .30-30, I'm not sure why you think riding around with your rifle will mess it up, but the .30-06 is the best of the options you listed, the .30-30 is a distant second.

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                  • #10
                    Neither is a good choice. From what I am reading you may be putting yourself in a life or death situation. If an encounter happens you want to put the animal down and fast. So whatever you decide dont have a scope on it. Only iron sights as you wont have time to focus. Secondly go big or go home...meaning a 45-70!!!! You can probably find a used one on gunbroker for cheap money that is already has banged up stock. Good luck whatever u decide.

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                    • #11
                      I think your best choice is your 30-30 for protection and the 30-06 for hunting. I have killed two black bear myself. My first was with a 270 win and the second a a 8x57 mauser. The first bear ran about 80 yards, and the second about 60 yards. Hit both bears in the same place. The point of the on side shoulder into the vitals. Bears are tough but not indestructible. Most black bears will turn and run the other way when they see you. I have a friend I introduced to bear hunting and he shot his first bear five times with a 280 rem semi-auto Rem 7400. The bear never made it out of sight. His second bear was hit three times with a 45-70. The first shot was in the rear end as the bear was up a tree. The second in the ribs, and after it fell out of the tree his final shot was through both shoulders. Shot placement is everything. The 30-30 I assume is a lever gun and will be faster to give follow up shots that a bolt gun. Use 170 grain bullets and you will have enough gun.

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