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While reading"ask the Expert_Bloodless Death"Andrew implied that the reason there was no blood was that the bullet was not str

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  • While reading"ask the Expert_Bloodless Death"Andrew implied that the reason there was no blood was that the bullet was not str

    While reading"ask the Expert_Bloodless Death"Andrew implied that the reason there was no blood was that the bullet was not strong enough to exit creating an exit wound. Many years ago, most writers would state that the proper bullet selection was one that entered the animal, expand to twice the size and retain it's mass but not exit. When have we decided that an exit wound was critical for a proper kill.Has this been since the use of more powerful magnum loadings? I still don't want my bullets to exit but do the damage inside. Am I just old fashoned following those older writers?

  • #2
    If using a proper bullet that will give maximum mushroom and still stay together and it exits is prefered. This will give an exit wound to track and still expend the wanted energy into the animal. Think about it, if the round doesn't exit and the bullet permormed well, maybe that round does not have the energy for a pass through. Thus, if the bullet performs equally, the pass through round will put more energy into the animal.

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    • #3
      When looking at the performance of a bullet on game the important thing isn't energy or any other measure of its characteristics from the standpoint of physics.

      Neither energy nor momentum kills animals. Terminal ballistics kills critters. More specifically, the trauma induced by the projectile on tissue, bone and blood vessels is where your killing "power" comes from.

      I happen to be a fan of bullets that, as PAShooter says, expand well, hold together and make two leaky holes in a critter. But if a bullet can induce massive trauma and remain in the animal, which happens under a variety of conditions, it will be just as dead and, with good shot placement, won't go very far.

      I'm going to do a story on terminal ballistics in an upcoming issue of the magazine that will talk about this in more detail.

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      • #4
        Two gaping holes and a heavy blood trail leave little doubt.

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        • #5
          I've seen an awful lot of deer and hogs run off with hits that should have put them on the ground right where they were, but didn't, and without the blood trail produced by a good exit wound they can get lost in the thick brush quite easily, even though they don't go too far. I'm all in favor of a bullet that expands well and leaves a big exit wound. Currently, I'm having REAL good results from the Barnes TTSX.

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          • #6
            Hmmm,where did the terminal ballistics come from if not using the energy? I did refer to proper expansion. Looking forward to your article.

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            • #7
              Think of it in terms of a cement truck going 60mph and hitting a block wall and destroying everything inside the room but not exiting the building.
              I opt for heavier bullet weight and a slower velocity, instead of lighter bullets and faster velocity. Don`t need an exit wound, because these bullets put the deer down in their tracks, or they only go a few yards. But there again, your marksmanship and self-control are crucial with this procedure, as it is no matter what you are shooting.
              I also shoot black-powder, which makes it easier for me to tailor my loads according to the terrain I`m hunting. Open fields or heavy woods. Haven`t lost a deer yet. Have missed though.
              I will stick with this procedure always, as it has never failed me.
              But I`m Old School.
              When you hit a 120 to 200 lb deer with a 460 to 490 grain bullet well placed, they don`t go very far if at all. Thus the cement truck analogy.

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              • #8
                To say that any bullet will always put them down with proper placement is not always true. There are very few true hard and fast rules. I have had more than one deer who ran. On field dressing each of them, I found that the heart was completely destroyed, yet one of these deer ran 110 yards in heavy cover. This year using the same cartridge, same day, about an hour apart, I killed two deer. Each deer was about 100 yards from my position. I hit almost exactly the same spot on each deer, within inches. One ran a little over 100 yards and piled under a mesquite tree, never to move again. The second one dropped in its tracks.
                Why? Beats me. There are too many variables to make a hard and fast statements about what will drop a deer in its tracks. The only consistent shot that I have seen that will drop any animal (four-legged or two-legged) in its tracks every time is a head or neck shot. You destroy the brain or the cervical spine, the target will drop right there. Otherwise only the hunting gods will know if it will run or drop. And most of the time they are not telling.
                I am probably what would be called old school. At least several of my friends like to remind me about hitting the big 6-0 this year. They want to tell me that that makes me old school.

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                • #9
                  Sorry Bo, I was not setting a hard and fast rule for others to live by, just explaining what works for me, after 40 yrs of trial and error.
                  It all started 20 yrs ago when I researched the Sharps Rifle and what it was capable of. I just transferred some of that loading data to the modern day inline and found the load and bullet that works really well in a lead conical of 460grn and a 490grn. In .50 cal.
                  Why?, because we can`t use center fires in Ohio and I wanted a load that would reach out there and take them down. Can`t shoot as far as the Sharps, but 220 and in is no problem. Yes that is with a scope, I`m only good out to 100 yds now with iron sights and that will no doubt be closing in to 50yds before to long.
                  I will say this, a neck shot does drop them like a bag of bricks, as I have done that more than once.
                  Age, I`m right there with you Bo.

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                  • #10
                    So if I'M bowhunting I want the arrow to retain it's energy and not exit, correct? Hmmmm, I don't think so.I'm gonna guess the right answer would be for a pass thru.It seems to me that it would take a lot of figuring to make A bullet expand and come to a complete halt within the limits of a rib cage.While inflicting damage,I;LL opt for an EXIT.

                    Comment

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