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These are my deer and black bear bullets.

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  • jhjimbo
    started a topic These are my deer and black bear bullets.

    These are my deer and black bear bullets.

    Are these any good ? Never used them. $15 at flea market today. Also, is the Barnes XLC bullet discontinued ? Was it any good ? I have a chance to get some 225gr XLC.
    Attached Files

  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
    Jimbo, I found a good but dated article with a short summary of the early Barnes bullets. (Attached below)

    I started using the original X-bullet back in the early 90's with great success on deer and pigs. But, they lived up to their somewhat bad reputation of quickly fouling my .308 barrel. Those 200 grain X-bullets should do well, just remember that you will need to be extra diligent in removing the resulting copper fouling.

    During the moly coated bullet craze, Barnes developed the XLC with a blue coating that was supposed to eliminate the copper fouling. However, removing the moly from the rifle's barrel also became a chore. It got so much bad press that I quit using them and still have a box or two around somewhere. I'll never load them and will eventually throw them in the trash (unless I find some sucker to buy them at a flea market).
    Hey Tree, ask WAM about Honady ammo .

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
    I know a guy that hunts those little 90 pound east Texas whitetails with a .338 Win Mag.
    That big, slow bullet apparently opens either minimally or not at all.
    He swears they just fall over dead and you can eat right up to the bullet hole!
    The .338 is not slow unless he loads way down. The .340Wby will go 250gr almost 3,000fps. I am loading 200 and 225. From 200gr to 250gr recoil energy almost doubles.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    I know a guy that hunts those little 90 pound east Texas whitetails with a .338 Win Mag.
    That big, slow bullet apparently opens either minimally or not at all.
    He swears they just fall over dead and you can eat right up to the bullet hole!

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
    Jimbo, I found a good but dated article with a short summary of the early Barnes bullets. (Attached below)

    I started using the original X-bullet back in the early 90's with great success on deer and pigs. But, they lived up to their somewhat bad reputation of quickly fouling my .308 barrel. Those 200 grain X-bullets should do well, just remember that you will need to be extra diligent in removing the resulting copper fouling.

    During the moly coated bullet craze, Barnes developed the XLC with a blue coating that was supposed to eliminate the copper fouling. However, removing the moly from the rifle's barrel also became a chore. It got so much bad press that I quit using them and still have a box or two around somewhere. I'll never load them and will eventually throw them in the trash (unless I find some sucker to buy them at a flea market).
    My longest dropped deer was with a handloaded Barnes X-bullet at over 600 yards. My first two pigs were a double, through and through, again with a handloaded Barnes X-bullet.

    Sure, other manufacturers make great bullets too. I shoot a lot of Hornady's products. However, Barnes bullets are without a doubt proven performers. This past weekend, I loaded over 100 of the Barnes 110 grain TAC-TX for the 300 BLK. That is my supersonic hunting load for the coming season.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
    Jimbo, I found a good but dated article with a short summary of the early Barnes bullets. (Attached below)

    I started using the original X-bullet back in the early 90's with great success on deer and pigs. But, they lived up to their somewhat bad reputation of quickly fouling my .308 barrel. Those 200 grain X-bullets should do well, just remember that you will need to be extra diligent in removing the resulting copper fouling.

    During the moly coated bullet craze, Barnes developed the XLC with a blue coating that was supposed to eliminate the copper fouling. However, removing the moly from the rifle's barrel also became a chore. It got so much bad press that I quit using them and still have a box or two around somewhere. I'll never load them and will eventually throw them in the trash (unless I find some sucker to buy them at a flea market).
    And i never lost a game animal using Hornady Ammo(One Shot Drop)

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by Treestand View Post
    I never knew deer & black bears were so hard to kill?? I've used a 7mm/08 on both and a 30/30 also with Hornady Flex Tip. Have i bean doing something wrong?? jimbo....
    I have shot bears and deer with silvertips and CoreLokt's as it was all I had.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
    Jimbo, I found a good but dated article with a short summary of the early Barnes bullets. (Attached below)

    I started using the original X-bullet back in the early 90's with great success on deer and pigs. But, they lived up to their somewhat bad reputation of quickly fouling my .308 barrel. Those 200 grain X-bullets should do well, just remember that you will need to be extra diligent in removing the resulting copper fouling.

    During the moly coated bullet craze, Barnes developed the XLC with a blue coating that was supposed to eliminate the copper fouling. However, removing the moly from the rifle's barrel also became a chore. It got so much bad press that I quit using them and still have a box or two around somewhere. I'll never load them and will eventually throw them in the trash (unless I find some sucker to buy them at a flea market).
    Well, the shortcomings are not something they would advertise. However, the terminal performance on game is legit. I've never lost an animal while using Barnes bullets.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    I never knew deer & black bears were so hard to kill?? I've used a 7mm/08 on both and a 30/30 also with Hornady Flex Tip. Have i bean doing something wrong?? jimbo....

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
    Jimbo, I found a good but dated article with a short summary of the early Barnes bullets. (Attached below)

    I started using the original X-bullet back in the early 90's with great success on deer and pigs. But, they lived up to their somewhat bad reputation of quickly fouling my .308 barrel. Those 200 grain X-bullets should do well, just remember that you will need to be extra diligent in removing the resulting copper fouling.

    During the moly coated bullet craze, Barnes developed the XLC with a blue coating that was supposed to eliminate the copper fouling. However, removing the moly from the rifle's barrel also became a chore. It got so much bad press that I quit using them and still have a box or two around somewhere. I'll never load them and will eventually throw them in the trash (unless I find some sucker to buy them at a flea market).
    I never knew Barnes had so many failures along the development path.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Jimbo, I found a good but dated article with a short summary of the early Barnes bullets. (Attached below)

    I started using the original X-bullet back in the early 90's with great success on deer and pigs. But, they lived up to their somewhat bad reputation of quickly fouling my .308 barrel. Those 200 grain X-bullets should do well, just remember that you will need to be extra diligent in removing the resulting copper fouling.

    During the moly coated bullet craze, Barnes developed the XLC with a blue coating that was supposed to eliminate the copper fouling. However, removing the moly from the rifle's barrel also became a chore. It got so much bad press that I quit using them and still have a box or two around somewhere. I'll never load them and will eventually throw them in the trash (unless I find some sucker to buy them at a flea market).

    Leave a comment:

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