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What's the longest you've kept game meat in the freezer ....

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  • Buckshott00
    replied
    I've kept venison for 1yr (longest it ever lasts in my house). The guy that processed that deer for me is a pro-butcher during his day job, and he does excellent work. I always prefer his cuts and prep.

    He wrapped it up for me and I packed it in a freezer. I've thought about a vacuum sealer or a foil pouch. Either would be good.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattM37
    replied
    Originally posted by country road View Post
    Just last week I found a pound of ground deer that had been hidden in the bottom of the freezer for two years. It made one of the best meat loafs I've had in a while. It was stored in one of those tube thingies that you use with your grinder. This time of year is when I try to use up any venison left over from last season in preparation for the coming season.

    I use a vacuum sealer for all other cuts and have no trouble unless a package gets punctured from me rummaging around in the freezer.
    Nice to find some you didn't know you had! I've been known to deliberately bury a package of venison in hopes of forgetting it -- just in an effort to not go through it so fast -- but it never works.

    Leave a comment:


  • country road
    replied
    Just last week I found a pound of ground deer that had been hidden in the bottom of the freezer for two years. It made one of the best meat loafs I've had in a while. It was stored in one of those tube thingies that you use with your grinder. This time of year is when I try to use up any venison left over from last season in preparation for the coming season.

    I use a vacuum sealer for all other cuts and have no trouble unless a package gets punctured from me rummaging around in the freezer.

    Leave a comment:


  • country road
    replied
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
    We've used vacuum sealers for years now, not just for game but also for stuff out of the garden. As long as the bag isn't compromised we have no issues.

    Tip for the quart bag size:
    Flatten them out to freeze, and you can then stack them on end in a 12 pack box (bottles) with the top cut out. Protects the bags, keeps things organized (burger, sausage, stew meat, etc in their own box) and stuff doesn't slide all over.
    Works for veggies too.
    Excellent tip. I will do that this year.

    Leave a comment:


  • JM
    replied
    Originally posted by JM View Post
    I think another thing worth stating is that how it is stored is just as important as how it is wrapped/packaged. I'm assuming that is why Treestand has hd good luck at his locker. I bet they do a great job of keeping it very cold, and very stable. Make sure it is kept cold and that nothing nearby can rub through or poke through the packaging.
    Frozen milk jugs and 2 liters also work well in coolers, Treestand. Another reason we always keep multiple frozen in our chest freezers. Saves on needing to buy bags of ice when go fishing, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • JM
    replied
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
    We've used vacuum sealers for years now, not just for game but also for stuff out of the garden. As long as the bag isn't compromised we have no issues.

    Tip for the quart bag size:
    Flatten them out to freeze, and you can then stack them on end in a 12 pack box (bottles) with the top cut out. Protects the bags, keeps things organized (burger, sausage, stew meat, etc in their own box) and stuff doesn't slide all over.
    Works for veggies too.
    Thanks for the tip...gives me an idea to try

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    Originally posted by JM View Post
    I think another thing worth stating is that how it is stored is just as important as how it is wrapped/packaged. I'm assuming that is why Treestand has hd good luck at his locker. I bet they do a great job of keeping it very cold, and very stable. Make sure it is kept cold and that nothing nearby can rub through or poke through the packaging.
    Bad part of a Coffin Or Chest freezer as the meat dwindles your A/C bill goes up to take the place of missing food! Fill you freezer with plastic milk jugs with water, they fill the VOID;-))

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    We've used vacuum sealers for years now, not just for game but also for stuff out of the garden. As long as the bag isn't compromised we have no issues.

    Tip for the quart bag size:
    Flatten them out to freeze, and you can then stack them on end in a 12 pack box (bottles) with the top cut out. Protects the bags, keeps things organized (burger, sausage, stew meat, etc in their own box) and stuff doesn't slide all over.
    Works for veggies too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    I like a vacuum sealer sucks all the air out of packages. It stops freezer burn and it saves freezer space.
    I eat the venison pretty fast but many have stated a year in the freezer is the limit? +2 Matt

    Leave a comment:


  • Pray- hunt-work
    replied
    Add me to the list for eating wild game more quickly than I can legally produce it. I vacuum seal everything unless it's going to be eaten within 36 hors or less. I've never paid to have an animal processed wether its moose, deer or a gifted Elk. Not sure what the elks gift was but it was given to my wife and I by a family on the ranch with 9 children at home and 6 of them hunted so they thought they may be "elked" out and we could use it.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattM37
    replied
    Originally posted by JM View Post
    I think another thing worth stating is that how it is stored is just as important as how it is wrapped/packaged. I'm assuming that is why Treestand has hd good luck at his locker. I bet they do a great job of keeping it very cold, and very stable. Make sure it is kept cold and that nothing nearby can rub through or poke through the packaging.
    Good point. And chest freezers beat your refrigerator's freezer-compartment any day of the week.

    Leave a comment:


  • JM
    replied
    I think another thing worth stating is that how it is stored is just as important as how it is wrapped/packaged. I'm assuming that is why Treestand has hd good luck at his locker. I bet they do a great job of keeping it very cold, and very stable. Make sure it is kept cold and that nothing nearby can rub through or poke through the packaging.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    I've never had paper wrapped meat that didn't eventually get frost bite in a freezer.
    On the other hand, I have four fingers and a thumb!
    ...and I wrap in Glad Wrap, then butcher paper. I've dug out meat that's been buried in the freezer for 2 or 3 years and it was just fine.
    The processor on Kodiak vacuum packs and flash freezes your fish and packs it 50/lbs/box.
    Vac-Pak or not, below freezing temps makes plastic brittle.
    By the time the "Ramp Apes" throw the boxes around a few times and the fish slides around in the box bumping into other frozen blocks of fish, the plastic gets little tiny pin holes that let air in and moisture out and the fish will eventually freezer burn.
    Vac-Pac is the only way Island Seafood will package fish for shipping.
    Fish I catch is weighed out in 1 pound increments. Each pound goes into a quart freezer bag, the bag filled with water and all the air squeezed out.
    Last "long time"!

    Leave a comment:


  • MattM37
    replied
    Originally posted by JM View Post
    I've never had the problem of seeing how long something can last. I either eat it or give it away well before any concern can arise. As you hinted to..how I package something corresponds with how I think it will be used. If it is something I will use quickly I'll often just put it in a freezer bag and call it good. If I have a lot of something it will probably get saran wrapped/freezer wrapped/put into a vacuum sealed freezer bag.
    Yes, it's usually not a concern. There have been years when I've eaten venison literally three meals a day until it was gone, and on an off day, when a work obligation or date or otherwise had me eating out for lunch or dinner, I'd still usually fry up a panful at some point -- like maybe 11:30 at night; nothing like venison and onions for a bedtime snack.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    I have used venison over 2.5 years when wrapped by a professional butcher. I use a vacuum sealer when I do mine and get about the same amount of time. Fish I put in water and freeze and then top off with more water and that lasts for a very long time when completely covered with ice.

    A tip for vaccum sealing meat: to keep the vaccum seal clean, place a paper towel on top of the meat to absorb any blood to keep it from getting into the seal area. A clean seal makes a stronger seal.

    Leave a comment:

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