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Hi...!!I've harvested many kinds of small and big game...but my all-time favorite is duck hunting...!!I've used 12 ga and 20 ga, with varying bores...yet, I get MANY more misses than hits...!! LOTS of action, but hardly any hits...!!I'm beginning

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  • Hi...!!I've harvested many kinds of small and big game...but my all-time favorite is duck hunting...!!I've used 12 ga and 20 ga, with varying bores...yet, I get MANY more misses than hits...!! LOTS of action, but hardly any hits...!!I'm beginning

    Hi...!! I've harvested many kinds of small and big game...but my all-time favorite is duck hunting...!! I've used 12 ga and 20 ga, with varying bores...yet, I get MANY more misses than hits...!! LOTS of action, but hardly any hits...!! I'm beginning to think that I'm probably leading them by much more than I should be...Will appreciate any comments regarding same...(Sometimes I think that the ducks double back just so they can laugh at me...!!)

  • #2
    I am what I would consider a good shot with a rifle, even on moving targets, but when it comes to hitting a flying bird I'd consider myself a below average shot. Everyone I hunt with tells me that I am overthinking it, and I think that they are onto something. If there are any trap ranges around where you live there are often people there that can help you!

    Comment


    • #3
      A pro at a sporting clays range might be the answer to your shooting woes. Those fellas can improve your technique and that of even the most accomplished shotgunner. As you appear to have been at the game for a while I am sure you understand the basics such as a good follow through and having the shotgun fit you properly. Follow through takes practice while getting a shotgun that points well for you often requires some adjustments on the stock. So, don't discount the possibility that the shotgun may be the source of your problems. What about the fps of the shotshells you are using. My brother and I began to question our shooting abilities as we experimented with the early edition of steel shot on migratory birds. At first it was simply because with steel at 1250 fps out of the muzzle it did not perform well past 40 yards of range...if that! The first steel ammo was a joke! Then the manufacturers wised up to the fact that steel shot doesn't kill worth a darn unless it has blinding speed right out of the muzzle. 1550 and 1700 fps compared to the <1300fps that was the average lead velocity translates into much shorter leads on passing birds. That extra 300 to 400 fps requires a major adjustment by the shooter. Often, hunters using lead loads will miss because they were shooting behind birds. jThe fast moving steel shot require a shorter lead so it can remedy that common error. I personally miss birds because I am in too much of a rush to get the shotgun to my shoulder. When good shotgunners are in the groove they shoulder the shotgun in one smooth motion swinging the barrel in the direction of the bird's flight. This increases the likelihood of the shotgun lining up or pointing theway it should. I know I have miscued when I call the sight picture to mind on the miss and see the barrel as opposed to just the bead. Again, the shotgun has to fit you to a T but that means little if you are not consistently shouldering the firearm into that natural point. A professional would have better advice then I can offer. I hunt geese and duck quite a bit and have done so for 55 years and I am still missing plenty of shots. I have always said if I hit 'em every time I would quit. If you want to keep enjoying bird hunting it is a good attitude to assume.

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      • #4
        You miss more ducks than you hit? Well, that means you're human! I don't know anyone who doesn't. If I get a limit of ducks (6) with one 25-round box of shells, I'm doing good. But I am like JM - a good rifle shot, but a very average - at best - wingshot. I'm hardly the right person to be giving wingshooting advice, but in my experience, it's almost impossible to lead ducks too much. Especially fast ducks like teal. My biggest problem is that in the excitement of the moment I sometimes forget to pull down far enough, and which leads to high misses. A dead giveaway that you're doing this is seeing a portion of your barrel or rib when shooting, instead of just the bead.

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        • #5
          Wait for them to come closer.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
            Wait for them to come closer.
            Hi...!!


            I've been missing them whether they were in close range or out to long range...!! Makes no difference...!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Kody View Post
              A pro at a sporting clays range might be the answer to your shooting woes. Those fellas can improve your technique and that of even the most accomplished shotgunner. As you appear to have been at the game for a while I am sure you understand the basics such as a good follow through and having the shotgun fit you properly. Follow through takes practice while getting a shotgun that points well for you often requires some adjustments on the stock. So, don't discount the possibility that the shotgun may be the source of your problems. What about the fps of the shotshells you are using. My brother and I began to question our shooting abilities as we experimented with the early edition of steel shot on migratory birds. At first it was simply because with steel at 1250 fps out of the muzzle it did not perform well past 40 yards of range...if that! The first steel ammo was a joke! Then the manufacturers wised up to the fact that steel shot doesn't kill worth a darn unless it has blinding speed right out of the muzzle. 1550 and 1700 fps compared to the <1300fps that was the average lead velocity translates into much shorter leads on passing birds. That extra 300 to 400 fps requires a major adjustment by the shooter. Often, hunters using lead loads will miss because they were shooting behind birds. jThe fast moving steel shot require a shorter lead so it can remedy that common error. I personally miss birds because I am in too much of a rush to get the shotgun to my shoulder. When good shotgunners are in the groove they shoulder the shotgun in one smooth motion swinging the barrel in the direction of the bird's flight. This increases the likelihood of the shotgun lining up or pointing theway it should. I know I have miscued when I call the sight picture to mind on the miss and see the barrel as opposed to just the bead. Again, the shotgun has to fit you to a T but that means little if you are not consistently shouldering the firearm into that natural point. A professional would have better advice then I can offer. I hunt geese and duck quite a bit and have done so for 55 years and I am still missing plenty of shots. I have always said if I hit 'em every time I would quit. If you want to keep enjoying bird hunting it is a good attitude to assume.
              Hi...!!


              I think you may have a point there...I could be shooting too HIGH...!! Thanks...!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JM View Post
                I am what I would consider a good shot with a rifle, even on moving targets, but when it comes to hitting a flying bird I'd consider myself a below average shot. Everyone I hunt with tells me that I am overthinking it, and I think that they are onto something. If there are any trap ranges around where you live there are often people there that can help you!
                I would say that I am a better shot during duck and other game bird situations, but my advice to you is to not be too nervous. When I miss, which I often do, like any other human, it is always a result of me being nervous. If you have time before the ducks get near, take a deep breath get in a comfortable position, that makes you able to swing your arms easily. Ducks are fast, but not too fast. You shouldn't have to lead a duck like a green head mallard by too much if they are coming across you, but on the other hand, if you have a fast bird like a teal, then you should lead them a little more.

                Comment

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