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What is the best way to approach someone to ask permission to hunt their land?

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  • What is the best way to approach someone to ask permission to hunt their land?

    What is the best way to approach someone to ask permission to hunt their land?

  • #2
    Dress respectable. Introduce yourself. Be polite. Don't show up in camo and firearm in hand. Ask them well before the hunting season, not the week or day before. Don't show up during their meal(s) time. Go at a respectable time, such as decent daylight hours. Tell them of your intent, what you plan to hunt, what hours you would like to hunt, how many years you have been hunting, you are safety conscious, and believe in a humane kill. You would like to know the layout of the property, so you are shooting in a safe direction. If it is farm, offer to help around the farm for exchange to hunt the land. The same can be said about a non-farm environment. Offer them some of the meat from the game that you will hunt. If, you plan to hunt with a friend bring them along too and have them offer the same as you do. I know I wouldn't want to grant somebody permission to hunt my land and they show up with other hunters that don't have my permission. You can get a DEC 'land permission card' that the landowner signs, which gives you their consent to hunt their land. That way you have proof you have the permission to hunt the land.
    Though you are there representing yourself, you are also representing hunters from everywhere. Whether the land owner grants you access or not, thank them graciously.
    Good luck and good hunting!

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    • #3

      I agree that is the best course of action. It also helps if you have a mutual acquaintence if you one that can give you a good refrence.
      When i was a west virginia resident i hunted on several farmers land. I used the same advice given previously and it seems most farmers always wanted you to do much hunting in the small game season and shoot as many ground hogs as you saw in an effort to protect their livestock. We would always give them notice atlest 2 to 3 days in advance of what days and what times we would be on their land just to be respectful for their willing to share their land for our enjoyment.

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      • #4
        A farmer lives where he works, take an active interest in what he does for a living. As stated above it is important that he knows what you plan on doing on his property. That is all about you, what about him? Most people are flattered when people are curious about their work and ask questions to learn how things are done. When your young son or daughter looks interested and perhaps a little nervous around that big tractor or farm animal that is all the more gratifying to the folks on the farm. When you have demonstrated an appreciation for the farmer's operation you establish a degree of trust that reading song and verse from the book of hunter's etiquette doesn't always accomplish. Who knows, you might actually learn something.. you may get a ride in a combine working a barley field.. a tour of the milking barn... a peek at a new calf... your kid may get a taste of the real thing instead of the petting zoo at the mall.. you may get to know the weight of hay bales.. or, you may get a good cup of coffee and the beginning a great friendship.

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        • #5
          And from I man that grew up on the farm and ranch once you get permission respect the property and the fences, nothing makes one madder than seeing his fences loosened by someone to lazy to go 100 yards to go through a gate or someone that thinks they can go mud bogging through their fields just because they have permission to hunt. Years ago had some coon hunters that kept cutting our fence, after closing the place off for awhile they got the hint. Have not had any problems since.

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