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Why do so many hunters/outdoorsmen hate coyotes? I will admit that I don't appreciate it when a pack invades my hunting property and starts spooking/killing deer or other game. And of course livestock/pet depredation is always unacceptable. But when

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  • Why do so many hunters/outdoorsmen hate coyotes? I will admit that I don't appreciate it when a pack invades my hunting property and starts spooking/killing deer or other game. And of course livestock/pet depredation is always unacceptable. But when

    Why do so many hunters/outdoorsmen hate coyotes? I will admit that I don't appreciate it when a pack invades my hunting property and starts spooking/killing deer or other game. And of course livestock/pet depredation is always unacceptable. But when it comes right down to it, they're just a predator, same as us. I have hunted and trapped them most of my life, so I'm not some coyote-hugger, but I've never understood why many people loathe them so much, often to the point of trying to totally wipe them off the landscape. I have never pursued a quarry more worthy of respect, whitetail deer and turkeys included.

  • #2
    I have had many memorable moments watching coyotes while hunting big game. They can pretend to be king of the hay field one moment and are dashing away in a most cowardly fashion with their tails between their legs the next. They are just one wild step from our best friend, the family dog. That alone makes it difficult for me to be a coyote hunter. When one confronts my hunting dogs, which has happened, that is an altogether different story.

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    • #3
      Let me start off by saying that I have always lived in an area with a pretty low coyote population...The only time I have ever had a major problem with coyotes is when they attacked/killed one of our dogs. I've known people that view coyotes as an "SOS" situation, but I do not really understand it.
      -Growing up I was always told that they were bad(and I believed it for a long time), so maybe that is a common occurrence? If you are told something growing up you will often believe it your entire life.

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      • #4
        I don't hate them but I have hunted them a bit every winter. Pretty smart critter most of the time. I won't mess up a deer hunt to shoot one but they are a shoot on sight most times.

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        • #5
          I guess many see them as direct competition to our hunting, but predation is figured into a quality game management program. Do I shoot them? Yes, but I have no hatred for them. Fact is, it is pretty impressive that they thrive in spite of all the obstacles they face.
          To borrow a quote from Bear Claw Chris Lapp in the movie Jeremiah Johnson: "You have done well to keep so much hair...when so many are after it."

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          • #6
            It seems we are in an age of envy, many want what someone else has especially if the other appears to have more. If a person has this attitude then it follows a coyote eating a deer or whatever is taking from them.

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            • #7
              All good answers. I think charlie elk may have hit the nail on the head though. It's the same attitude that leads people to talk about "their" deer or turkeys or pheasants or whatever. People thinking that they own wildlife is one of my biggest pet peeves. Even if the wildlife in question lives on your land, you don't own it, because wildlife can't be owned by an individual. I think that attitude also leads those people to resent predators taking "their" wildlife.

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              • #8
                This is a great question, and one that's perplexed me, too. When I was a kid, we shot every coyote on sight - regardless of season or sport. My dad would have let almost any other animal walk, but coyotes were different. Fast forward all these years, and I'm much the same way, even though I agree with everyone who says they deserve better, I have a grudge against coyotes that is only satisfied when I sling lead their way. I think our antipathy to coyotes comes from something very deep and ancient. These were the animals that didn't accept the social contract that domestic dogs did - trading their wildness for a warm bed and a food bowl. We've never really accepted them, or forgiven them for preying on the same animals that we do. Great discussion....
                - mckean

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                • #9
                  I agree with the postee; coyotes deserve a lot more respect. I had just gotten into my treestand for a nice block of deer hunting time when this coyote strolls up, sniffs beneath my stand (I had just sat down), and then strolled over to my mock scrape, where she then proceeded to urinate. I had a momentary thought of sticking her with an arrow, but I just sat there and watched all of this in awe. This encounter was worth the trip to the stand.

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                  • #10
                    Where hunters, especially in East Texas, may be shooting themselves in the foot by eliminating coyotes is in controlling wild pigs.

                    "I believe that the coyote population in East Texas has positively responded to the increase in pig populations over the past three decades," said Dr. Billy Higginbotham, Texas AgriLife Wildlife Specialist. "Small pigs make ideal food items and there are places in the area river bottoms like the Neches that it is difficult to find coyote scat that does not contain pig hair. Again, the predation level is certainly not sufficient to control the pig population, but they are apparently using the young pigs as a food source extensively."

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                    • #11
                      I once made a joke about coyotes to a rancher friend in Central Texas, and he made it clear that coyotes were not a laughing matter, because they are a threat to the livelihood of sheep and goat ranchers. He considered their presence to be as serious as any livestock disease, and that would never be the subject of a joke.

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                      • #12
                        Where are all these members from 2,3 or 4 years ago ?

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