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If you are hunting on public land next to private land clearly marked as no trespassing, do you give a buffer or do you hunt to

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  • #31
    Charlie, I'd have to go back through the archives, but I thought I responded to that. I can't imagine not allowing someone to retrieve, but I think in your situation you were more understanding than most. I live along a major creek and there is an old mill race that is the back of my property line. I have no issue with someone deciding to try their luck in the creek or along the race. They start poking around my buildings or seem to be watching my daughter's swim, well that's an entirely different animal.

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    • #32
      By the way, the statement "you archers" was an artifact of me cutting up and pasting my original post in a hurry to be small enough to accept. I'm nothing special as a hunter, but 2 of my last 3 deer have been with a bow.

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      • #33
        "you keep saying that if don't know the landowner adjoining the property where you're hunting, you should stay a "certain distance", to use your own words, from the boundary. So what is that distance, since you clearly know everything about this issue? Is it 200 yards? 400? A half-mile? Because a badly-hit animal can easily travel a half mile in many cases, and we ALL hit animals badly once in a while, because nobody's perfect" - Every location and situation are unique and different. As a hunter know your limitations or please stay at home until you learn. There is a lot more to hunting than shooting. People will make mistakes and game will be lost, but you can minimize your risks. I would start with the measuring tool in Google Earth.

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        • #34
          You did respond on that question jcarlin, it was a couple of years ago. Thanks. Um, spying on daughter or now my granddaughter--all bets are off!
          Something else I would like to add, if someone retrieves game quickly from posted land they should inform the landowner of that act. They may risk a trespass charge, though in the vast majority of cases probably not. Cameras are everywhere these days and it would be very bad to have your picture turned over to the authorities with no other explanation, the context would look very bad.
          later,
          charlie

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          • #35
            Way to dodge my question schmakenzie. I ask you what your "buffer zone" is, and you tell me to use the measuring tool in Google Maps, but without telling me what distance to measure!
            I actually agree with you on one point, every situation is unique and different, and everyone should decide what their limitations are for themselves. But it seems to me that you've been telling others on this thread what they should and shouldn't do, based on the way you do things yourself. So which is it? Do we all decide for ourselves, or should we try to force others to do things our way, just because we disagree with how they're doing them, even though it's legal?

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            • #36
              I almost didn’t respond, because your response is so poorly thought out and written. (1)"I ask you what your "buffer zone" is, and you tell me to use the measuring tool in Google Maps, but without telling me what distance to measure!" - As I said every situation and location is unique. Please figure out what works for you. Nobody can decide for you. I use Google Earth as one of my tools. (2) "But it seems to me that you've been telling others on this thread what they should and shouldn't do, based on the way you do things yourself." - It seems, is a phrase for I am guessing or I do not know for sure. The truth is you have no idea. Please stick with facts. (3)"Do we all decide for ourselves, or should we try to force others to do things our way, just because we disagree with how they're doing them, even though it's legal?" - Trespassing is illegal. In some states, trespassing plus hunting equals poaching. (4)"Way to dodge my question " - Everyone knows I don't dodge anything on this site, I love to debate. You are the one dodging, so please explain what was already asked - "I just see a paragraph of excuses for breaking the law. There is no gray area. Are you poaching or hunting legal? If it is no big deal and everyone does it, go ahead and explain to us the time you did it."

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              • #37
                schmakenzie, for my own edification, what was it about my post that was so poorly written? You can disagree with my stance on this issue all you want, but when someone accuses me of making language errors, I want to know why - I pride myself on writing clearly.
                As to your original question, I didn't know that it was directed at me personally, so now that I know that, I will answer it - I do not dodge anything either!
                I will give you an example of one of the 3 or 4 times I've had to track a hit animal onto another property without asking the landowner. I hit a buck with my bow, and while it was just a flesh wound (bad shot on my part, no excuse) we had to follow it up. We tried to contact the adjoining landowner, but no one was home, so when the blood trail reached the fence, I put my bow down and we continued on. To make a long story short, we finally stalked close enough to the deer to see that the wound was in fact not fatal, so we dropped the trail and left. Were we trespassing or poaching? No, not under Iowa law. All of the other 3 or 4 times I mentioned were under similar circumstances, and were 100% legal under Iowa law. Does that answer your question as to whether I was hunting legally or not?

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                • #38
                  @Charlie.
                  You know, I never really considered cameras. I think part of it is because I had no intention of permitting either a crime or game offense.
                  Though it's funny, they cross my mind every time I take a leak.
                  @Schmakenzie, you sound like an angry ranch owner, and I can imagine if that's the case, you have the experiences to back up the anger. I think that any thinking person would agree that illegal isn't always wrong any more than legal is always right. For example, I have 3 kids, I think they're all the dependents I should be required by law to support, but apparently 120 million Americans are on food assistance, which means I'm supporting at least one or two of them, too. I may choose to do so, but taking my money and giving to others without my consent isn't right. But it's legal.

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                  • #39
                    Committing, not permitting. Work on the brain.

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