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What ar your thoughts, Pighunter, regarding John Snow’s Hunting Blog, ?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by rockhound View Post
    I was invited by my commander to go for a Hog hunt in SC. I was the driver and the suppler of the ride down. First morning 185 yrd behind the ear dropped a 285 pound boar. Remington 76 30/06 180 grain core-lokt. The rest of the hunt was spent was looking over barren grounds. The meat wasn't useable. Said boar in season.
    The .30-06 with Core-Lokts has worked very well for me when shooting pigs. Good choice.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
      Pig hunter, you might find my rifle calibers used on Giant Forest Hogs interesting. The first hog taken with a 375 H&H in the Central African Republic {C.A.R.} because Air France on a whim decided they would not carry my firearms. This has happened before so though not happy, knew I could borrow something when I got there. As usual, it was a 375. The ammo was an odd assortment of old cartridges with no idea what grain bullets. They worked fine, had a great adventure and as I recall, took every animal I was searching for, one shot each. So much for careful planning of firepower.
      The second hog I used my trusty old 416 Rigby because we were in heavy West African jungle {Cameroon} known for cranky Red, Forest buffalo and even grumpier, Forest Elephant, so you had to be prepared with enough gun. Took everything from small animals up to both elephant and buff.
      Gee, I thought it was my inate supernatural talents that made it all work? Seriously, in that part of Africa a long shot might be a hundred yards, most on that trip around 50 to 80 yards. The rifle was a well used old Sako with a good optic which I cannot recall the identity. I suspect the ammo, though of different manufacturers , might have been all 300 grain, it being by far the most popular weight 375 bullet across Africa. Go with the 375 over the 416 for a one rifle safari, if it includes dangerous game requiring at least that caliber. The great 416 is too stiff in recoil in that role for most folks. Bear in mind I am somewhat used to it after decades of annual use. I usually take a 300 Win Mag and my 416. For new comers I usually recommend something like an 06 and a 375.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
        Happy Miles, thanks for pointing me towards Mr. Snow's article. It's great to see OL post hunting stories such as this, showing the good and not so good along with lessons learned. I think Mr. Snow did a fine job in the limited space he had.

        As far as pay hunts, pigs are truly a cheap date, depending on many factors of course. I find it interesting that the high fence operation was set up to include feral pigs. I went to the Chain Ranch web site and found they have discontinued selling pig hunts. However, they provide 5 day whitetail hunts for $4000 to $6000. In contrast, If meals were included with the housing, then $200 per person daily doesn't seem out of line. Likewise, $100 per animal doesn't seem excessive if that includes a guide processing the animal for meat transport. That would also cover the baiting costs... A few years ago I went on a pay hunt for a large pig in Central Florida. Dogs caught the prey and I used a spear to dispatch the boar. That was $250 + tip to the guide and I considered it worth the money. PigHuntress and I had a great time and we got a cooler full of pork!

        I'm like Mr. Snow's group and prefer to hunt and stalk instead of sitting in a blind. But I understand that a pay ranch wants to somewhat control their clients. That's one of the main reasons I continue to hunt on public land in my late 50's.

        Their experience hunting private land provided an interesting lesson in bartering hunts with someone in another State. It's fun too if you're a social creature! Like Snow, I've shot a small piglet just for the purposes of eradication. Definitely not trophy or bragging material! Also, Like Treestand, I'm not interested in eating pigs that are larger than 200 lbs. The best I've tasted have been less than 100 lbs - and they are easier to drag / process.

        As far as public land, it can indeed be a hard hunt without the suriety of success you'll find with a pay hunt. Pigs of course are very smart and have that incredible sense of smell. Also, they can have a pretty wide range and vacate an area if too pressured. I guess pressure causes them to go nocturnal, but part of it is because of heat. Pigs do not sweat, so being active at night is probably better for them.

        What are your thoughts? I'm sure you have some fine stories of hunting pigs around the world! Best Regards
        Where was your brother hunting?

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
          In a new turkey hunting spot this morning, I noticed the landowners cattle grazing on the far side of the wheat pasture.
          Egads! Not cow but feral swine!
          About 7 or 8 sows of around 150/200 pounds and probably 30 or so piglets.
          A car that slowed on the road put the gun shy pigs in a headlong rush to my location.
          At about 20 yards, I stood up to avoid the stampede. the first sow that turned broadside received a Federal "Third Degree" in the left shoulder.
          No. It didn't anchor her, though I did get a nice cloud of dust, turned the herd and avoided getting trampled to death! LOL!
          Yes sir. If you have a SDA* card.
          I had my .40 S&W with me, my 870 was just "in hand"! LOL!
          Had I thought just a moment quicker...!

          After getting my license I didn't often carry.
          About 2 years ago, I bought a S&W "M&P Shield" .40 S&W.

          I carry it, literally, EVERYWHERE!
          I have to be cautious that I don't carry it into prohibited settings like court rooms and schools!
          It is such a part of my daily dress code, I sometimes forget it's there.
          "Familiarity breeds contempt!"?

          *SDA - Oklahoma's version of a CHL and refers to Oklahoma's "Self Defense Act".

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
            In a new turkey hunting spot this morning, I noticed the landowners cattle grazing on the far side of the wheat pasture.
            Egads! Not cow but feral swine!
            About 7 or 8 sows of around 150/200 pounds and probably 30 or so piglets.
            A car that slowed on the road put the gun shy pigs in a headlong rush to my location.
            At about 20 yards, I stood up to avoid the stampede. the first sow that turned broadside received a Federal "Third Degree" in the left shoulder.
            No. It didn't anchor her, though I did get a nice cloud of dust, turned the herd and avoided getting trampled to death! LOL!
            I've also forgotten that I had a sidearm. A few years ago, I'd dropped one of a pair of pigs just at last light. It was a thickly wooded area so there were plenty of small trees around. I leaned the Remington 7400 against a tree while taking photos and starting to field dress the pig. As I was cutting on the carcass by headlamp, I heard a large animal approaching in the dark. The semi-auto was out of reach and the unknown animal was almost upon me. So, I decide to stand and just yell "Git outta here!" It was probably the other pig and it promptly ran away. Later, I realized the Ruger LC9 was in my pocket. That pistol is so light and thin it's easy to forget it's there. I don't know if the hollow points would have been enough to drop the other pig. In any case, it was already dark and I had one on the ground to take care of. Besides, I was out of cell phone coverage and didn't want PigHuntress to start worrying. Popping a pig with the 9mm could have led to an all night tracking job, lol!

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
              Happy Miles, thanks for pointing me towards Mr. Snow's article. It's great to see OL post hunting stories such as this, showing the good and not so good along with lessons learned. I think Mr. Snow did a fine job in the limited space he had.

              As far as pay hunts, pigs are truly a cheap date, depending on many factors of course. I find it interesting that the high fence operation was set up to include feral pigs. I went to the Chain Ranch web site and found they have discontinued selling pig hunts. However, they provide 5 day whitetail hunts for $4000 to $6000. In contrast, If meals were included with the housing, then $200 per person daily doesn't seem out of line. Likewise, $100 per animal doesn't seem excessive if that includes a guide processing the animal for meat transport. That would also cover the baiting costs... A few years ago I went on a pay hunt for a large pig in Central Florida. Dogs caught the prey and I used a spear to dispatch the boar. That was $250 + tip to the guide and I considered it worth the money. PigHuntress and I had a great time and we got a cooler full of pork!

              I'm like Mr. Snow's group and prefer to hunt and stalk instead of sitting in a blind. But I understand that a pay ranch wants to somewhat control their clients. That's one of the main reasons I continue to hunt on public land in my late 50's.

              Their experience hunting private land provided an interesting lesson in bartering hunts with someone in another State. It's fun too if you're a social creature! Like Snow, I've shot a small piglet just for the purposes of eradication. Definitely not trophy or bragging material! Also, Like Treestand, I'm not interested in eating pigs that are larger than 200 lbs. The best I've tasted have been less than 100 lbs - and they are easier to drag / process.

              As far as public land, it can indeed be a hard hunt without the suriety of success you'll find with a pay hunt. Pigs of course are very smart and have that incredible sense of smell. Also, they can have a pretty wide range and vacate an area if too pressured. I guess pressure causes them to go nocturnal, but part of it is because of heat. Pigs do not sweat, so being active at night is probably better for them.

              What are your thoughts? I'm sure you have some fine stories of hunting pigs around the world! Best Regards
              The Bush Pig was taken in Zimbabwe along the Limpopo River. My brother was there mainly for leopard but added a few other animals. Apparently, the Bush Pig is primarily nocturnal there and he took it on the last morning of hunting. His next hunt is about a year from now in South Africa and our nephew is going this time around. It was an auction hunt he won at our local chapter of the Safari Club. I'll probably not join them on that trip but may go sometime in the future.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by rockhound View Post
                I was invited by my commander to go for a Hog hunt in SC. I was the driver and the suppler of the ride down. First morning 185 yrd behind the ear dropped a 285 pound boar. Remington 76 30/06 180 grain core-lokt. The rest of the hunt was spent was looking over barren grounds. The meat wasn't useable. Said boar in season.
                PH I have told this story before from hunting in Turkey. Guys with shotguns were stationed in the brush. One guy had a pig run right toward him and he hit it with one or maybe two shots with buckshot. The pig ran right over him and ripped his calf open on the way by.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by rockhound View Post
                  I was invited by my commander to go for a Hog hunt in SC. I was the driver and the suppler of the ride down. First morning 185 yrd behind the ear dropped a 285 pound boar. Remington 76 30/06 180 grain core-lokt. The rest of the hunt was spent was looking over barren grounds. The meat wasn't useable. Said boar in season.
                  Jimbo, sorta makes you pause doesn't it? I've never used buckshot on an animal. I have killed pigs with a .22 magnum but they were not charging me at the time!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    ..and the legend of our Yankee brothers saving their poor, southern Rebel counterparts from "swine overload" for nothing runs rampant and unabated!
                    LOL!
                    Any ranch has to turn a profit to stay in business! With a cattle market and grain market that can be fickle at best, if there is 2 cents profit in tumble weeds, goat heads or bull nettle kernels, you can bet your sweet bippy you'll find them on a store shelf somewhere!

                    In Oklahoma and Texas, several farmers allowed anybody who wanted to hunt pigs to come and hunt them.
                    Cut fences, destroyed crops, rutted wheat fields, injured livestock and general disarray and mayhem soon followed.

                    Then there is the "liability" issues that arise!
                    Who would have thought that Joe Dummy would think he could pet an 1800 pound bull? By the way! The bull WAS NOT impressed!
                    Then there is that 300 acre bald open field with that 6 strand barbed wire fence running across the middle of it!
                    Gee, a 4 wheeler doing 35 MPH in the dark won't penetrate THAT!

                    Now Joe Dummy got himself all dead, his relatives decide to sue and another family farm bites the dust!

                    We have enough redneck "saviors" down here without another Yankee invasion to come save us from ourselves!
                    If you have friends or relatives that are willing to accommodate you for free, go for it! If not, be willing to pay for the experience so we can at least try to repair the damage when you leave and afford liability insurance for your next visit.
                    YOU aren't that kind of Hunter?
                    Great!
                    What about the next camo'd up, tat covered, bewhiskered, ear ring wearing rube that steps up to darken my front door and offers to take care of some of those wild hogs? ...for FREE!

                    I'd rather have the hogs!

                    NOTE:
                    1) All the above meant with humor!
                    2) Pig hunting isn't a cut and dried affair.
                    A) Once shot up, a herd will either relocate or go nocturnal.
                    B) Baiting for hogs isn't like baiting for true game species. With feral hogs, it's all fair!
                    C) A .30-30 Win or that class cartridge is sufficient for ferals.
                    D) A sow will breed and reproduce at 6 months of age. Kill young sows! They eat better and you have reduced future numbers.
                    E) For being nervous, a whitetail can't hold a candle to feral hogs.

                    Have fun!
                    Pigs ARE a challenge! LOL!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Pig hunter, Sitatunga are not well known by many who go to Africa. There are four sub species all found in adventuresome places, swamps or swamp edges most common, they are among my most favorite animals.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by rockhound View Post
                        I was invited by my commander to go for a Hog hunt in SC. I was the driver and the suppler of the ride down. First morning 185 yrd behind the ear dropped a 285 pound boar. Remington 76 30/06 180 grain core-lokt. The rest of the hunt was spent was looking over barren grounds. The meat wasn't useable. Said boar in season.
                        I shot a big boar broadside at 25 yards with one round of OO buckshot, it ran maybe 30 yards and fell dead. I did not choose the firearm or ammo, it was what was handed to me

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by rockhound View Post
                          I was invited by my commander to go for a Hog hunt in SC. I was the driver and the suppler of the ride down. First morning 185 yrd behind the ear dropped a 285 pound boar. Remington 76 30/06 180 grain core-lokt. The rest of the hunt was spent was looking over barren grounds. The meat wasn't useable. Said boar in season.
                          I guess I should add ‘‘twas a 12 gauge.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
                            Pig hunter, Sitatunga are not well known by many who go to Africa. There are four sub species all found in adventuresome places, swamps or swamp edges most common, they are among my most favorite animals.
                            I'll give the Sitatunga a closer look.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by rockhound View Post
                              I was invited by my commander to go for a Hog hunt in SC. I was the driver and the suppler of the ride down. First morning 185 yrd behind the ear dropped a 285 pound boar. Remington 76 30/06 180 grain core-lokt. The rest of the hunt was spent was looking over barren grounds. The meat wasn't useable. Said boar in season.
                              Country Road has hunted more than I have using buckshot. That was the tradition in Alabama when using dogs or people to dive deer into a line of hunters. The WMA's I frequent require slugs and prohibit the use of buckshot.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                https://www.fieldandstream.com/answers/rifles/45-70-govvs-450-marlin

                                The .450Marlin by Hornady Leverevolution is 325gr, 3" high at 100yds is dead on at 200yds. About $32/box 20

                                Comment

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