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What ar your thoughts, Pighunter, regarding John Snow’s Hunting Blog, ?

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  • What ar your thoughts, Pighunter, regarding John Snow’s Hunting Blog, ?

    Do it yourself hog hunting?

  • #2
    I was invited by my commander to go for a Hog hunt in SC. I was the driver and the suppler of the ride down. First morning 185 yrd behind the ear dropped a 285 pound boar. Remington 76 30/06 180 grain core-lokt. The rest of the hunt was spent was looking over barren grounds. The meat wasn't useable. Said boar in season.

    Comment


    • #3
      Good Wild Pork is 200lb & under!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Happy Miles, thanks for pointing me towards Mr. Snow's article. It's great to see OL post hunting stories such as this, showing the good and not so good along with lessons learned. I think Mr. Snow did a fine job in the limited space he had.

        As far as pay hunts, pigs are truly a cheap date, depending on many factors of course. I find it interesting that the high fence operation was set up to include feral pigs. I went to the Chain Ranch web site and found they have discontinued selling pig hunts. However, they provide 5 day whitetail hunts for $4000 to $6000. In contrast, If meals were included with the housing, then $200 per person daily doesn't seem out of line. Likewise, $100 per animal doesn't seem excessive if that includes a guide processing the animal for meat transport. That would also cover the baiting costs... A few years ago I went on a pay hunt for a large pig in Central Florida. Dogs caught the prey and I used a spear to dispatch the boar. That was $250 + tip to the guide and I considered it worth the money. PigHuntress and I had a great time and we got a cooler full of pork!

        I'm like Mr. Snow's group and prefer to hunt and stalk instead of sitting in a blind. But I understand that a pay ranch wants to somewhat control their clients. That's one of the main reasons I continue to hunt on public land in my late 50's.

        Their experience hunting private land provided an interesting lesson in bartering hunts with someone in another State. It's fun too if you're a social creature! Like Snow, I've shot a small piglet just for the purposes of eradication. Definitely not trophy or bragging material! Also, Like Treestand, I'm not interested in eating pigs that are larger than 200 lbs. The best I've tasted have been less than 100 lbs - and they are easier to drag / process.

        As far as public land, it can indeed be a hard hunt without the suriety of success you'll find with a pay hunt. Pigs of course are very smart and have that incredible sense of smell. Also, they can have a pretty wide range and vacate an area if too pressured. I guess pressure causes them to go nocturnal, but part of it is because of heat. Pigs do not sweat, so being active at night is probably better for them.

        What are your thoughts? I'm sure you have some fine stories of hunting pigs around the world! Best Regards

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
          Happy Miles, thanks for pointing me towards Mr. Snow's article. It's great to see OL post hunting stories such as this, showing the good and not so good along with lessons learned. I think Mr. Snow did a fine job in the limited space he had.

          As far as pay hunts, pigs are truly a cheap date, depending on many factors of course. I find it interesting that the high fence operation was set up to include feral pigs. I went to the Chain Ranch web site and found they have discontinued selling pig hunts. However, they provide 5 day whitetail hunts for $4000 to $6000. In contrast, If meals were included with the housing, then $200 per person daily doesn't seem out of line. Likewise, $100 per animal doesn't seem excessive if that includes a guide processing the animal for meat transport. That would also cover the baiting costs... A few years ago I went on a pay hunt for a large pig in Central Florida. Dogs caught the prey and I used a spear to dispatch the boar. That was $250 + tip to the guide and I considered it worth the money. PigHuntress and I had a great time and we got a cooler full of pork!

          I'm like Mr. Snow's group and prefer to hunt and stalk instead of sitting in a blind. But I understand that a pay ranch wants to somewhat control their clients. That's one of the main reasons I continue to hunt on public land in my late 50's.

          Their experience hunting private land provided an interesting lesson in bartering hunts with someone in another State. It's fun too if you're a social creature! Like Snow, I've shot a small piglet just for the purposes of eradication. Definitely not trophy or bragging material! Also, Like Treestand, I'm not interested in eating pigs that are larger than 200 lbs. The best I've tasted have been less than 100 lbs - and they are easier to drag / process.

          As far as public land, it can indeed be a hard hunt without the suriety of success you'll find with a pay hunt. Pigs of course are very smart and have that incredible sense of smell. Also, they can have a pretty wide range and vacate an area if too pressured. I guess pressure causes them to go nocturnal, but part of it is because of heat. Pigs do not sweat, so being active at night is probably better for them.

          What are your thoughts? I'm sure you have some fine stories of hunting pigs around the world! Best Regards
          An outstanding answer, as I expected and why I asked you the question. You flatter me regarding my pig hunting experience, which actually is not much. Taken perhaps a dozen here in The States, all on ranches attempting to thin or indeed get rid of them. While in Africa have taken several wart hogs, a relatively simple task, mostly for leopard baits. A couple Bush pigs, just because the camp help consider them a delicacy. One Red, River hog as a trophy. Have taken two Giant Forest Hogs, which some hunters have found difficult trophies because they like the deep cover of West African jungle and it is logistically difficult traveling to those countries. Both of mine were simple. The first, I was sighting in my rifle on the way to camp and the hog bolted out of cover and I dropped it on the run. The second one appeared while I was hunting Forest Sitatunga and I pleaded a pass but the pigmy trackers mutinied, demanding I shoot it, as their favorite food. To prevent a palace revolt, I complied. They partied all night and were not worth a darn the next day. The Giant Forest Hog is aptly named, they are enormous. Kindest Regards

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
            Happy Miles, thanks for pointing me towards Mr. Snow's article. It's great to see OL post hunting stories such as this, showing the good and not so good along with lessons learned. I think Mr. Snow did a fine job in the limited space he had.

            As far as pay hunts, pigs are truly a cheap date, depending on many factors of course. I find it interesting that the high fence operation was set up to include feral pigs. I went to the Chain Ranch web site and found they have discontinued selling pig hunts. However, they provide 5 day whitetail hunts for $4000 to $6000. In contrast, If meals were included with the housing, then $200 per person daily doesn't seem out of line. Likewise, $100 per animal doesn't seem excessive if that includes a guide processing the animal for meat transport. That would also cover the baiting costs... A few years ago I went on a pay hunt for a large pig in Central Florida. Dogs caught the prey and I used a spear to dispatch the boar. That was $250 + tip to the guide and I considered it worth the money. PigHuntress and I had a great time and we got a cooler full of pork!

            I'm like Mr. Snow's group and prefer to hunt and stalk instead of sitting in a blind. But I understand that a pay ranch wants to somewhat control their clients. That's one of the main reasons I continue to hunt on public land in my late 50's.

            Their experience hunting private land provided an interesting lesson in bartering hunts with someone in another State. It's fun too if you're a social creature! Like Snow, I've shot a small piglet just for the purposes of eradication. Definitely not trophy or bragging material! Also, Like Treestand, I'm not interested in eating pigs that are larger than 200 lbs. The best I've tasted have been less than 100 lbs - and they are easier to drag / process.

            As far as public land, it can indeed be a hard hunt without the suriety of success you'll find with a pay hunt. Pigs of course are very smart and have that incredible sense of smell. Also, they can have a pretty wide range and vacate an area if too pressured. I guess pressure causes them to go nocturnal, but part of it is because of heat. Pigs do not sweat, so being active at night is probably better for them.

            What are your thoughts? I'm sure you have some fine stories of hunting pigs around the world! Best Regards
            You always prompt me to Google search the places and animals mentioned in your posts! I confess to having to look up both the Sitatunga and Giant Forest Hog to see where they live. I bet that was an adventure! My brother has a Bush Pig mount on the way through customs and has asked me to hang it in my office at work because he's running out of climate controlled spots. It should make for interesting conversations with my co-workers!

            Comment


            • #7
              In a new turkey hunting spot this morning, I noticed the landowners cattle grazing on the far side of the wheat pasture.
              Egads! Not cow but feral swine!
              About 7 or 8 sows of around 150/200 pounds and probably 30 or so piglets.
              A car that slowed on the road put the gun shy pigs in a headlong rush to my location.
              At about 20 yards, I stood up to avoid the stampede. the first sow that turned broadside received a Federal "Third Degree" in the left shoulder.
              No. It didn't anchor her, though I did get a nice cloud of dust, turned the herd and avoided getting trampled to death! LOL!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                In a new turkey hunting spot this morning, I noticed the landowners cattle grazing on the far side of the wheat pasture.
                Egads! Not cow but feral swine!
                About 7 or 8 sows of around 150/200 pounds and probably 30 or so piglets.
                A car that slowed on the road put the gun shy pigs in a headlong rush to my location.
                At about 20 yards, I stood up to avoid the stampede. the first sow that turned broadside received a Federal "Third Degree" in the left shoulder.
                No. It didn't anchor her, though I did get a nice cloud of dust, turned the herd and avoided getting trampled to death! LOL!
                Now that is a close encounter! I wonder what a neck shot would have done...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                  In a new turkey hunting spot this morning, I noticed the landowners cattle grazing on the far side of the wheat pasture.
                  Egads! Not cow but feral swine!
                  About 7 or 8 sows of around 150/200 pounds and probably 30 or so piglets.
                  A car that slowed on the road put the gun shy pigs in a headlong rush to my location.
                  At about 20 yards, I stood up to avoid the stampede. the first sow that turned broadside received a Federal "Third Degree" in the left shoulder.
                  No. It didn't anchor her, though I did get a nice cloud of dust, turned the herd and avoided getting trampled to death! LOL!
                  Was that your #8 shot turkey load ?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I hunted pigs in Turkey. We had about 15 or 20 beaters and would set up drives. After the hunt we would go to the coast (Mediterranean) and cook one on the beach. Local home made wine and goats cheese, eckmek bread and pig meat kept us going all night.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                      I hunted pigs in Turkey. We had about 15 or 20 beaters and would set up drives. After the hunt we would go to the coast (Mediterranean) and cook one on the beach. Local home made wine and goats cheese, eckmek bread and pig meat kept us going all night.
                      Sounds like fun! I wish to one day hunt pigs in Eastern Europe

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                        In a new turkey hunting spot this morning, I noticed the landowners cattle grazing on the far side of the wheat pasture.
                        Egads! Not cow but feral swine!
                        About 7 or 8 sows of around 150/200 pounds and probably 30 or so piglets.
                        A car that slowed on the road put the gun shy pigs in a headlong rush to my location.
                        At about 20 yards, I stood up to avoid the stampede. the first sow that turned broadside received a Federal "Third Degree" in the left shoulder.
                        No. It didn't anchor her, though I did get a nice cloud of dust, turned the herd and avoided getting trampled to death! LOL!
                        pighunter, probably nothing! LOL!
                        Every one of the sows had the long haired, long snouted, nasty looking, Russian blood line appearance.

                        jimbo, no sir, but I was wishing for my 6.8mm AR!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Pig hunter, you might find my rifle calibers used on Giant Forest Hogs interesting. The first hog taken with a 375 H&H in the Central African Republic {C.A.R.} because Air France on a whim decided they would not carry my firearms. This has happened before so though not happy, knew I could borrow something when I got there. As usual, it was a 375. The ammo was an odd assortment of old cartridges with no idea what grain bullets. They worked fine, had a great adventure and as I recall, took every animal I was searching for, one shot each. So much for careful planning of firepower.
                          The second hog I used my trusty old 416 Rigby because we were in heavy West African jungle {Cameroon} known for cranky Red, Forest buffalo and even grumpier, Forest Elephant, so you had to be prepared with enough gun. Took everything from small animals up to both elephant and buff.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
                            Pig hunter, you might find my rifle calibers used on Giant Forest Hogs interesting. The first hog taken with a 375 H&H in the Central African Republic {C.A.R.} because Air France on a whim decided they would not carry my firearms. This has happened before so though not happy, knew I could borrow something when I got there. As usual, it was a 375. The ammo was an odd assortment of old cartridges with no idea what grain bullets. They worked fine, had a great adventure and as I recall, took every animal I was searching for, one shot each. So much for careful planning of firepower.
                            The second hog I used my trusty old 416 Rigby because we were in heavy West African jungle {Cameroon} known for cranky Red, Forest buffalo and even grumpier, Forest Elephant, so you had to be prepared with enough gun. Took everything from small animals up to both elephant and buff.
                            Now that is indeed very interesting Happy Miles. And leads to some intriguing paths of discussion. I've often suspected that I put way too much thought and effort into bullet selection. Too, perhaps it's unnecessary trying to squeeze that last bit of accuracy out of a firearm. There you were with a borrowed rifle and a hodge-podge of cartridges and the hunt went well anyway. Seems to confirm that the .375 is truly an all-around cartridge. Perhaps also that it's more important to get close enough and have proper shot placement, thus making bullet selection a secondary concern. Another path of discussion concerns the 416 Rigby vs the .375 H&H. Obviously, you considered it a better choice going after large animals in thicker cover. Would the 416 also be a better choice for a one rifle solution when hunting anywhere in Africa?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                              In a new turkey hunting spot this morning, I noticed the landowners cattle grazing on the far side of the wheat pasture.
                              Egads! Not cow but feral swine!
                              About 7 or 8 sows of around 150/200 pounds and probably 30 or so piglets.
                              A car that slowed on the road put the gun shy pigs in a headlong rush to my location.
                              At about 20 yards, I stood up to avoid the stampede. the first sow that turned broadside received a Federal "Third Degree" in the left shoulder.
                              No. It didn't anchor her, though I did get a nice cloud of dust, turned the herd and avoided getting trampled to death! LOL!
                              Bubba, is it legal to tote a sidearm while hunting turkey in your area?

                              Comment

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