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What spare 'back up' parts do you have for your gear, vehicle or weapon.

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  • What spare 'back up' parts do you have for your gear, vehicle or weapon.

    For example, do you carry a spare extractor for your rifle ? Happened on a hunt in Michigan. Turns a bolt action into a single shot.
    Old timers familiar with Chrysler products will remember you had to keep a spare ballast resistor with you. When they went, you did not - stopped the vehicle cold.

  • #2
    I used to carry spare halogen bulb for my light. Now with LED's I might not any more. I still carry a back up knife. I have a magnetic compass in case the GPS craps out.
    When I change something on the vehicle I keep the old. Like a halogen headlight bulb or a serpentine belt.

    Comment


    • #3
      Do duct tape and baling wire count as spare parts?

      Comment


      • #4
        Jimbo, like you I keep a compass and map to back up the GPS.

        My headlamp and wrist-mounted GPS both use AAA batteries and I carry spare. The second flashlight in my pack also uses AAA.

        Three forms of lighting a fire are in my backpack and of course the electrical system in the SUV provides a 4th means.

        My water bottle is single-wall stainless and can be used for boiling more water if necessary. In my pack are water purifying tablets and a Lifestraw.

        My hunting pack has at least one knife to back up the one on my hip. A revolver holstered cross-draw backs up my rifle.

        A camo tarp is used to shelter my blind from light rain and can be used as a ground cloth for a nap or to make emergency overnight shelter. The tarp could also be used to make a litter if an injured hunter needs to be carried out of the woods. A solar still could be constructed using all or part of the tarp. Sometimes I use a military poncho instead of the tarp.

        I could go on, but you get the idea.

        Comment


        • #5
          I carry in my old truck a 4' sand jack, two cans of Fix-a-flat truck size, two 12volt battery's with a battle switch,+ lots of tools & chain saw in my truck box, outdoors first aid kit, 1 Gal water/1gal anti-freeze,2Qt 5w-30 oil, spear serpentine belt. When We go out of state ,I tow my Egg-Shell trailer with all the comfits of home AC/TV Honda LP generator + spear Guns.That's how We Roll!!

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          • #6
            Truck has all the basic tools plus a power pack and compressor.
            I was going to say I had oil and coolant, but my tailgate came open at some point a few weeks ago. A crate came out that had some odds and ends in it, kind of the catch all bin, but none of my major tools or gear I keep back there (capped bed). Couldn't think of anything other than random junk that had collected in that particular container.. but oil and coolant were in there.

            The gun parts is a more interesting thought. The only gun that I generally have spare parts with it is an AR which I keep a complete BCG in my bag just in case as it's full of small parts that can and do fail and instead of playing with dismantling one at a class or on a range day, I'd rather just take the 5 seconds to pop in a complete one and analyze at home.
            Never occurred to me to carry a spare extractor for a hunting gun.

            Comment


            • #7
              Vehicle-wise, I just make sure my AAA card is in my wallet behind my hunting license. I'm not much of a car mechanic, anyway. Gear-wise, I keep a "war-bag" in the car with all the standard car-survival-kit stuff; wool blanket, gorilla tape, food, rope, axe, saw, etc., plus extra knives, more slugs or shells, and a couple of flashlights. Bag also contains extra wool socks, synthetic long johns, fleece jackets, hats, and gloves. The small kits on my person always have basic survival and first-aid stuff, but there's always plenty of those types of items in the car, too. During the fishing seasons, I generally have at least two extra rods and two extra reels in the car, plus plenty of extra line, of any kind or strength I might decide I need.

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              • #8
                Let's see basic first aid kit. Gorilla tape 3m super 33 Electrical tape. Zip ties, 10" cresent wrench, two pairs of knipex cobra adjustable pliers 16oz ballpeen hammer. Plug kit. Air pump. Couple of large knives a pistol usually.357 or a 45. And a Klein 10 in 1 a straight and a number 2 Phillips screwdriver a pair of tig gloves. Jersey gloves usually about 6 pairs shop rags and blue shop towels. And I can't remember anything else. But god only knows what else I have I've forgot. And my work bag has small knipex pliers and a six inch crescent wrench and a Klein 4 in 1 and some other odds and ends a pair of 4 inch vise grips. With my mechanical background I'm usually not in a pickle for to long.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
                  Jimbo, like you I keep a compass and map to back up the GPS.

                  My headlamp and wrist-mounted GPS both use AAA batteries and I carry spare. The second flashlight in my pack also uses AAA.

                  Three forms of lighting a fire are in my backpack and of course the electrical system in the SUV provides a 4th means.

                  My water bottle is single-wall stainless and can be used for boiling more water if necessary. In my pack are water purifying tablets and a Lifestraw.

                  My hunting pack has at least one knife to back up the one on my hip. A revolver holstered cross-draw backs up my rifle.

                  A camo tarp is used to shelter my blind from light rain and can be used as a ground cloth for a nap or to make emergency overnight shelter. The tarp could also be used to make a litter if an injured hunter needs to be carried out of the woods. A solar still could be constructed using all or part of the tarp. Sometimes I use a military poncho instead of the tarp.

                  I could go on, but you get the idea.
                  I carry a nylon lite weight tent fly for the same reasons, but it is blaze orange.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
                    Jimbo, like you I keep a compass and map to back up the GPS.

                    My headlamp and wrist-mounted GPS both use AAA batteries and I carry spare. The second flashlight in my pack also uses AAA.

                    Three forms of lighting a fire are in my backpack and of course the electrical system in the SUV provides a 4th means.

                    My water bottle is single-wall stainless and can be used for boiling more water if necessary. In my pack are water purifying tablets and a Lifestraw.

                    My hunting pack has at least one knife to back up the one on my hip. A revolver holstered cross-draw backs up my rifle.

                    A camo tarp is used to shelter my blind from light rain and can be used as a ground cloth for a nap or to make emergency overnight shelter. The tarp could also be used to make a litter if an injured hunter needs to be carried out of the woods. A solar still could be constructed using all or part of the tarp. Sometimes I use a military poncho instead of the tarp.

                    I could go on, but you get the idea.
                    Good idea Jimbo. That's rain protection without costing to much in weight or space. I like the heavier weight tarp because I sometimes spread it on the ground when I want to take a nap.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have always carried my Chapman gun screwdriver kit in case I ever needed to disassemble and dry a wet rifle--kitchen screwdrivers are guaranteed to hop out of the screwdriver slot and skittle across your stock or metal work. When going some distance to hunt, I always carried a second rifle. Let's face it: if you have a serious problem like a broken firing pin or extractor, you're not very likely to be able to fix it in the woods or at a hunting camp. A second scope for one rifle is a great idea. I also carried a spare knife and a Glock 29 in 10mm for backup. An empty Gatorade bottle means you don't have to come out of your tree stand to answer a call of nature. I always carried a full box of cartridges in my backpack--sometimes two. A thermos or insulated water bottle is great to keep you hydrated. I carried a small bottle of Rem Oil and a rag in a Ziploc bag so I could wipe down my rifle after a day of hunting. I would also carry rain gear in my backpack, just in case. Oh--don't hunt in cotton clothing. If it gets wet, it takes forever to dry out, and you can get hypothermia before that happens! Some snacks also help keep your internal fires going!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ChevJames View Post
                        I have always carried my Chapman gun screwdriver kit in case I ever needed to disassemble and dry a wet rifle--kitchen screwdrivers are guaranteed to hop out of the screwdriver slot and skittle across your stock or metal work. When going some distance to hunt, I always carried a second rifle. Let's face it: if you have a serious problem like a broken firing pin or extractor, you're not very likely to be able to fix it in the woods or at a hunting camp. A second scope for one rifle is a great idea. I also carried a spare knife and a Glock 29 in 10mm for backup. An empty Gatorade bottle means you don't have to come out of your tree stand to answer a call of nature. I always carried a full box of cartridges in my backpack--sometimes two. A thermos or insulated water bottle is great to keep you hydrated. I carried a small bottle of Rem Oil and a rag in a Ziploc bag so I could wipe down my rifle after a day of hunting. I would also carry rain gear in my backpack, just in case. Oh--don't hunt in cotton clothing. If it gets wet, it takes forever to dry out, and you can get hypothermia before that happens! Some snacks also help keep your internal fires going!
                        Good back up list.
                        I to take a second rifle. After carrying my main rifle for a day or two, I switch to my Mod. '94 that I can carry all day and not get tired.

                        Comment

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