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One arrow quiver?

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  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
    I should imagine that if a hunter were to miss with two arrows, it would be too late for a third. Just sayin.'
    Having on one occasion missed with two arrows and said lucky/stupid/arrogant animal stood still to allow a third, I assumed something was either wrong with my setup or me and opted not to fire the third until I had a chance to fully evaluate the situation.
    It was me. But I still was apparently not physically or mentally in a place where I should've taken that third shot.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattM37
    replied
    Originally posted by dewman View Post
    Do you older guys remember when Aldo Leupold wrote about the purity of hunting, how there is no judgement of our behavior except for what comes from ourselves. The measurement coming from the approval or disappointment in the image that gazes back at us from the bathroom mirror. Yet the vast majority of today's outdoor gear is aimed toward the "Look at me, look at me, I'm a great hunter because I kill bigger, faster and more" mindset. This is the division between the older and newer generation of hunters that seems to be growing. This self serving seeking of fame and attention based on how much we kill and how big as opposed to just the experience of being out there is fine when you're 12 but in grown ups representing all of us, I don't think the concept of the "pro" hunter or mimicking one does hunting any favors. Sorry for rambling, I just worry sometimes.
    Not that there aren't diamonds in the rough, and not that I don't get too worked up about it sometimes. I just clicked on the "7 Rules for Backcountry Camps," or whatever its title, fully expecting another thinly-disguised gear list (with "Buy it Now!" at the end of each paragraph), and instead found it to be a nice little piece with some good practical advice. And the guy just wrote it from his own experience; he didn't serve as scribe for some "pro" outfitter. Alright, good. My mood's improving; got some fresh coffee and some Girl Scout Tagalongs here on the desk.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattM37
    replied
    Originally posted by dewman View Post
    Do you older guys remember when Aldo Leupold wrote about the purity of hunting, how there is no judgement of our behavior except for what comes from ourselves. The measurement coming from the approval or disappointment in the image that gazes back at us from the bathroom mirror. Yet the vast majority of today's outdoor gear is aimed toward the "Look at me, look at me, I'm a great hunter because I kill bigger, faster and more" mindset. This is the division between the older and newer generation of hunters that seems to be growing. This self serving seeking of fame and attention based on how much we kill and how big as opposed to just the experience of being out there is fine when you're 12 but in grown ups representing all of us, I don't think the concept of the "pro" hunter or mimicking one does hunting any favors. Sorry for rambling, I just worry sometimes.
    I worry, too. And the whole "pro" thing just burns my ass; I have no use for the entire concept. I hate it when FS or OL puts up a "Ten Pros Tell You How to Get Your Deer!" type of story. I get it, I get it; if someone's a guide, he's earning a living from it and therefore a "professional," but that's not how it's presented. And even when products are not specifically mentioned, those stories and most others now are clearly directed at those who are newer to the outdoors, and they are the target of most of the advertising. The fabled young male demographic, the locker-room / frat house mentality: It's been the primary market since the late 90s, when all of a sudden, that part of the population had more disposable income than ever before. It's why ESPN suddenly became more interested in replaying me-dances than the actual play; it's why FS went through a period of printing juvenile, snotty responses to Letters to the Editor and calling them funny; etc. And no, it's not just old-timers and middle-agers who don't like it; I was in my twenties when it began -- a member of that demographic myself -- and even at the time I thought it was asinine. You know what's really interesting? Every time FS or OL prints something from years past, like that "Tommy's Fiddle" by Norm Strung a while ago, or a collection of Taps Tips, the response is always very favorable, with more comments posted than there are with anything current.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
    Possible it was for bowfishing?
    Now that is for someone I would have to call a real purist. Won’t find many of that breed in today’s world ! Traditional ! Do you mean there are still stupid people shooting traditional equipment ? Don’t they know that it is impossible to “kill” an animal in that manner ? Gee, such idiocy !

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by dewman View Post
    Do you older guys remember when Aldo Leupold wrote about the purity of hunting, how there is no judgement of our behavior except for what comes from ourselves. The measurement coming from the approval or disappointment in the image that gazes back at us from the bathroom mirror. Yet the vast majority of today's outdoor gear is aimed toward the "Look at me, look at me, I'm a great hunter because I kill bigger, faster and more" mindset. This is the division between the older and newer generation of hunters that seems to be growing. This self serving seeking of fame and attention based on how much we kill and how big as opposed to just the experience of being out there is fine when you're 12 but in grown ups representing all of us, I don't think the concept of the "pro" hunter or mimicking one does hunting any favors. Sorry for rambling, I just worry sometimes.
    Rambling ? I was hoping you were just getting started. Leupold was a man of the times in his generation ! Now he is long forgotten and his ideals on hunting have gone with him. The younger generation of today has no knowlege of the challenge of the sport, it now being the easiest and most sure way of putting an animal at it’s last breath. All the advantage has to be with the “hunter” ! One only needs to look where technology has taken killing in the last 20-25 years ! Archery is now a joke, muzzle loaders are now not much different than rifles, all challenges have been removed for the sake of easy success, success with out much gratification in my eyes. There are many who will say “ who are you to say how people should hunt”, but the optimum word here is “hunt”! Challenging means of hunting were put in for those who desired something a little different, but those who thought it was too demanding for their abilities, sure took care of that. Sorry Dewman, now I am the one rambling, but it feels good to do so !!

    Leave a comment:


  • dewman
    replied
    Do you older guys remember when Aldo Leupold wrote about the purity of hunting, how there is no judgement of our behavior except for what comes from ourselves. The measurement coming from the approval or disappointment in the image that gazes back at us from the bathroom mirror. Yet the vast majority of today's outdoor gear is aimed toward the "Look at me, look at me, I'm a great hunter because I kill bigger, faster and more" mindset. This is the division between the older and newer generation of hunters that seems to be growing. This self serving seeking of fame and attention based on how much we kill and how big as opposed to just the experience of being out there is fine when you're 12 but in grown ups representing all of us, I don't think the concept of the "pro" hunter or mimicking one does hunting any favors. Sorry for rambling, I just worry sometimes.

    Leave a comment:


  • JM
    replied
    Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
    Possible it was for bowfishing?
    I did some research and found that the one I saw is intended for traditional equipment, as in a recurve or longbow.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Have we not yet learned that there is no such thing as a wacky/goofy hunting thing yet? It doesn’t make a tinkers damn, what ever stupid thing is marketed, there will be a goofie who will buy it !!! We certainly wouldn’t want the gimmick makers to not make money now would we ? I guess we are all looking for the magic wand and the sure thing in the hunting field, and some don’t give a damn how unethical it may be, if it means success is possible, ethics or fair chase are not to be bothered with. Success is the magic word in today’s world..........!

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Crossbows are pretty deadly today with scopes. Most bolts fly through the big game animal.
    When I was a teenager on a hunting/camping trip, my cousin Jay had a single shot and single barrel shotgun.
    He would say all I need is one shot.
    Black powder muzzle loader is single shot also.
    By the time you reload most animals are out of the area.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Slap camo on it and they will buy no matter how silly.

    Some other stupid stuff I have seen:

    New Browning Citori "cross-over" field/sporting clays O/U shotguns come with, are you ready for this, thirty-two inch barrels!!! Might be okay for standing on the line at the trap range but walking around with one of those under your arm while upland hunting? Not unless you're taller than Lebron James and built like Hulk Hogan. You'd think Browning would have more on the ball.

    And I see CZ is now marketing a new O/U with 3.5" chambers. Yeeouch!! First, anyone who hunts waterfowl with only two shells in the gun is doing the birds a disservice (especially geese!). Many times honkers have absorbed three punishing loads of BB shot before I could bring them down. Secondly, 3.5 twelve gauge was a dopey gimmick to start with. Only encouraged skybusting ... and maybe made some orthopedic surgeons wealthier. Those things are brutal enough fired out of a reduced recoil semi-auto but they're just plain destructive when used in fixed breech guns like O/Us and pumps.

    Mojo field goose decoys are about the dumbest thing yet devised for waterfowl hunting. Sure, those wing-flappers may make a difference for ducks but honkers DO NOT like motion in the decoy set. First thing I did when my new goose decoys arrived a few years ago was throw away all the motion stakes and make some fixed ones similar to what came on the same brand shells fifty years ago ... before some dumbass genius figured moving deeks works for geese ... obviously without ever trying it first! Similarly, flags were a useful development for those who lay in their decoys (and I don't) but everyone has known from the time those things first hit the fields that you put them away as soon as you have the attention of the geese. And that can be a mile or more distant.

    Leave a comment:


  • MattM37
    replied
    I haven't actually been in my local Bass Pro of Gander Mountain, or even on any websites shopping, for probably a couple years now. The last stupid product I saw was here on OL, actually, when they posted the review/advertisement for that extra shell-holder or whatever it was, for hunting migratory birds when you can only have three shells in your shotgun.

    Leave a comment:


  • dewman
    replied
    "Beware the man with one arrow, he likely knows how to use it."
    Barney Fife uses and endorses them on his outdoor show, "Nip it in the Buck"

    Leave a comment:


  • 6phunter
    replied
    Oh, that's the new positive thinking quiver,one arrow one buck, only top end bow hunters like my self are using them to showboat our skills. I got mine on sale ,they were cheaper by the dozen?

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    Possible it was for bowfishing?

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    It could be for an X~Bow, once you let #1 fly, it takes 3 minutes to re-load!
    I have a (3) Arrow Quiver on my X~Bow cost $85.99

    Leave a comment:

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