Top Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Downtime

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Sit perfectly still and scan the surroundings; sometimes I doze.

    I've thought about reading but I get too nerved up that I'm making too much noise.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by JM1993 View Post
      Good timing for question. This will be first hunting season since completely done with school, and I often took hunting time as a chance to study in peace. I like to use my phone and unfortunately missed out on an amazing buck due to it(not sure if anyone remembers but I told the short version of the story last year). I'll attempt to keep it in my pocket this year. Recently I've been trying to get into a habit of keeping a journal. I suggest you doing the same, HFT. We could be hunting 50 years from now and be able to look back to these days. I will also draw or carve on wood while sitting down hunting. A lot of times the squirrels alone are enough to keep me occupied(although sometimes they are annoying enough you have to convince yourself not to blow then up lol).
      -
      Edit: And sometimes I just take a nap haha. That's the best way to pass time on a slow day.
      JM, keeping a journal during the slow times while hunting is a great idea.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by dewman View Post
        Assuming you mean sitting in a deer stand. I watch it all. Animals, birds, insects, and I'm listening to everything I can. However sometimes I think about the hunting companions I had growing up and the fields, forests, lakes, rivers, mountains and plains we hunted and fished. Think about future hunts too. There just ain't enough time if you hunt and fish. I wish I would've taken my kids even more. I wish every single time I was asked to go hunting or fishing I would have said yes. That's what I daydream about when it gets really slow.
        Dewman, I'm trying to play catch up on hunting and fishing time with my Dad who's 84. I wish I'd gone with him more when we were both younger.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by country road View Post
          I always take a book with me to my stand. The last couple of years, it has been a Kindle. I'll read half a page and look up---have missed a couple of opportunities, yeah, but as much time as I spend in the woods, I get bored with the birds and squirrels, after all, our season lasts some 86 days, not counting bow season (which I don't do). I have my own place to hunt, so I have to be careful not to drink too deeply from that cup and spoil it for myself. Sometimes I will text with my buddy on the next ridge over. I don't dare nap since I snore like a horny alligator and would frighten all the wildlife and some of the spirits. When I'm in a ladder stand, I like to scatter bird feed around and keep an eye out for unusual feathered visitors.
          Country Road, using a Kindle is a great idea! That way I can vary the print size on the screen and it wouldn't be such a strain on my eyes, focusing back and forth between reading and watching for game.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
            Like most of you, I've tried a variety of things to help pass the time while waiting. In the last couple of years, playing with the phone has become the favorite, especially if within cell coverage. The phone is unique in being able to text, email, shop, catch up on news, take photos, modify those photos, etc. etc. Recently I purchased a nice sound recorder and I plan to also take it into the woods to record birds, frogs, running streams, etc.

            Sometimes I use my dedicated camera to take still photos and video if something interesting strikes my fancy. I was doing just that last year when two deer came within 20 yards. I'd been on my feet since sunrise, stalk hunting for pigs along a small wooded valley. There I was, kneeling beside the stream, taking a video of water spilling over a beaver dam, crossbow leaned against a tree, and here comes a doe being pursued by a young buck. They never knew I was there before moving on. Oh well, time for a hearty laugh!

            I've found that reading anything and then looking up for game causes a lot of strain on my eyes, probably due to all that refocusing. So, the cell phone and any other reading material stays put away when I'm serious about the hunt.

            Some people have trouble being alone with just their own thoughts and memories and thus need a distraction. Fortunately I'm not one of those and can sit for hours watching the woods. However, it's time to go home if the internal dialog causes me to lose interest in the moment and in the hunt. Might as well do something else if your heart is not in it.
            Looking back at Country Road's comment on this string, I realized that with a Kindle you can change the font size. I do that on a regular basis when reading while walking on a treadmill. Could reduce the eyestrain I mentioned.

            Comment

            Welcome!

            Collapse

            Welcome to Outdoor Life's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Outdoor Life, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

            If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

            And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on outdoorlife.com.

            Right Rail 1 Ad

            Collapse

            Top Active Users

            Collapse

            There are no top active users.

            Right Rail 2 Ad

            Collapse

            Latest Topics

            Collapse

            Right Rail 3 Ad

            Collapse

            Footer Ad Widget

            Collapse
            Working...
            X