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How can we better protect our image of hunting ?

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  • How can we better protect our image of hunting ?

    Last week I finally visited the F&S site and I ask this question because there was a posting titled "I finally got my deer" posted 11-30-16 which gave detais of inadequate shooting and gruesome details of the death of the animal. Is the information that is openly displayed needed in our sport and what affect does it have on the image of hunting ?

  • #2
    I saw that, too, and was very glad to see that a fair number of readers responded disapprovingly. We hate to do that with a new hunter getting his first deer, of course, but I'd say that kid's actions warranted it. As for the public image part, on the one hand, I do keep in mind that there are aspects of hunting that aren't always as clean and tidy as we'd like them to be, and it's just a fact that non-hunters have to accept (those who are true anti-hunters aren't going to accept anything, regardless of how clean and tidy it is). But what bothers me the most is when a hunter describes situations like that as if they're commonplace instead of exceptions, and perfectly acceptable instead of regrettable. I think that harms our public image as badly as anything else. I think one of the biggest things in our favor is our emphasis on clean, humane kills and respect for the animal. If an honest mistake is made and it doesn't quite happen just right, fine -- but don't talk about it later like it's just another day in the woods. Express some regret about it; discuss it as a learning experience that will make you put more thought and effort into your hunting. And if the hunter in question doesn't feel that regret, or have the desire to do better, then he or she should just stay out of the woods.

    Comment


    • #3
      Matt sums it up pretty good.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
        I saw that, too, and was very glad to see that a fair number of readers responded disapprovingly. We hate to do that with a new hunter getting his first deer, of course, but I'd say that kid's actions warranted it. As for the public image part, on the one hand, I do keep in mind that there are aspects of hunting that aren't always as clean and tidy as we'd like them to be, and it's just a fact that non-hunters have to accept (those who are true anti-hunters aren't going to accept anything, regardless of how clean and tidy it is). But what bothers me the most is when a hunter describes situations like that as if they're commonplace instead of exceptions, and perfectly acceptable instead of regrettable. I think that harms our public image as badly as anything else. I think one of the biggest things in our favor is our emphasis on clean, humane kills and respect for the animal. If an honest mistake is made and it doesn't quite happen just right, fine -- but don't talk about it later like it's just another day in the woods. Express some regret about it; discuss it as a learning experience that will make you put more thought and effort into your hunting. And if the hunter in question doesn't feel that regret, or have the desire to do better, then he or she should just stay out of the woods.
        Matt, I will agree that there was some rather light hearted disaproval, however I did not get the feeling that it was severe enough for this person to take it as a serious rebuke. We must all remember, these instances do not affect only the guilty that are involved, they affect all of us and our sport and we have a responsibility to make comments in the strongest words to let those sitting on the fence about hunting know that we are not all buttholes that this individual is. If we say nothing then we are approving these actions and I will in no way be part of that !! Political correctness is a disease that will take all of us down, not just the idiots. I say these words with no sense of a smile !

        Comment


        • #5
          I read that post too but did not offer anything. 12 shots I believe, 3 hits, only 1 fatal. I'd never encountered that before and thus my fingers were rendered speechless. All of you have very valid points and since he's working toward getting an AR, I hope he finds someone where he is at to put forth some guidance. If I knew him personally, him and I would have had a "talk" as I'm sure you would have also. I'm not sure a public calling out and dressing down of someone I believe to be young/new would have accomplished anything positive.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
            I saw that, too, and was very glad to see that a fair number of readers responded disapprovingly. We hate to do that with a new hunter getting his first deer, of course, but I'd say that kid's actions warranted it. As for the public image part, on the one hand, I do keep in mind that there are aspects of hunting that aren't always as clean and tidy as we'd like them to be, and it's just a fact that non-hunters have to accept (those who are true anti-hunters aren't going to accept anything, regardless of how clean and tidy it is). But what bothers me the most is when a hunter describes situations like that as if they're commonplace instead of exceptions, and perfectly acceptable instead of regrettable. I think that harms our public image as badly as anything else. I think one of the biggest things in our favor is our emphasis on clean, humane kills and respect for the animal. If an honest mistake is made and it doesn't quite happen just right, fine -- but don't talk about it later like it's just another day in the woods. Express some regret about it; discuss it as a learning experience that will make you put more thought and effort into your hunting. And if the hunter in question doesn't feel that regret, or have the desire to do better, then he or she should just stay out of the woods.
            I hear you, Richard. I think many among us are hesitant to be "that guy," 'cause you know that someone would come down on you for giving a newbie a hard time. I've heard a fair amount of questionable stuff be excused or at least not reprimanded because of the "we need new hunters, don't discourage them!" sort of thing. I think it does more harm than good, myself, and honestly, even if our numbers are low, we're better off without certain types.

            Comment


            • #7
              BHR....Yes, this does shed a bad light on hunters in general. He needs a mentor or someone to guide him through the proper aspects of ethical kills, (I don't use harvest) but at the same time "not" be ashamed of killing if he plans to eat whatever he takes. Hopefully he's had the hunter safety course but there is, as we all know, much more to learn. It's a great question and one we all need to consider. Good hunting.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                I saw that, too, and was very glad to see that a fair number of readers responded disapprovingly. We hate to do that with a new hunter getting his first deer, of course, but I'd say that kid's actions warranted it. As for the public image part, on the one hand, I do keep in mind that there are aspects of hunting that aren't always as clean and tidy as we'd like them to be, and it's just a fact that non-hunters have to accept (those who are true anti-hunters aren't going to accept anything, regardless of how clean and tidy it is). But what bothers me the most is when a hunter describes situations like that as if they're commonplace instead of exceptions, and perfectly acceptable instead of regrettable. I think that harms our public image as badly as anything else. I think one of the biggest things in our favor is our emphasis on clean, humane kills and respect for the animal. If an honest mistake is made and it doesn't quite happen just right, fine -- but don't talk about it later like it's just another day in the woods. Express some regret about it; discuss it as a learning experience that will make you put more thought and effort into your hunting. And if the hunter in question doesn't feel that regret, or have the desire to do better, then he or she should just stay out of the woods.
                To answer the ?,discussions such as what has followed here is about all we can do to formulate to new hunters what is to be expected out of them,to be able to call themselves accomplished hunters.Who here wishes to throw the first stone?We all know perfect kills doesn't aways happen,yet this is the outcome we all endeavor to procur.Words are our most powerful tools,if we cut to deep we fail to achieve our goal and lose its meaning.Well chosen words correcting the actions without berating to harshly is the avenue evolving novices into hunters.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                  I saw that, too, and was very glad to see that a fair number of readers responded disapprovingly. We hate to do that with a new hunter getting his first deer, of course, but I'd say that kid's actions warranted it. As for the public image part, on the one hand, I do keep in mind that there are aspects of hunting that aren't always as clean and tidy as we'd like them to be, and it's just a fact that non-hunters have to accept (those who are true anti-hunters aren't going to accept anything, regardless of how clean and tidy it is). But what bothers me the most is when a hunter describes situations like that as if they're commonplace instead of exceptions, and perfectly acceptable instead of regrettable. I think that harms our public image as badly as anything else. I think one of the biggest things in our favor is our emphasis on clean, humane kills and respect for the animal. If an honest mistake is made and it doesn't quite happen just right, fine -- but don't talk about it later like it's just another day in the woods. Express some regret about it; discuss it as a learning experience that will make you put more thought and effort into your hunting. And if the hunter in question doesn't feel that regret, or have the desire to do better, then he or she should just stay out of the woods.
                  6p, for once I agree with some of your words, and as far as who wishes to throw the first stone, I will also agree that is hard for any of us to do. We all know that in hunting situations all does not go well and that on occasions things happen that we do not wish for or try for, but hopefully also do not talk about in a bravado manner. If we as hunters can not have respect and in some way also feelings for our killing, then the sport is better off without us. That is the premiss of this question, how do we protect the image of hunting and I say make it difficult for those who put it in jeopardy and do not sugar coat our words just so not to offend them !

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                    I saw that, too, and was very glad to see that a fair number of readers responded disapprovingly. We hate to do that with a new hunter getting his first deer, of course, but I'd say that kid's actions warranted it. As for the public image part, on the one hand, I do keep in mind that there are aspects of hunting that aren't always as clean and tidy as we'd like them to be, and it's just a fact that non-hunters have to accept (those who are true anti-hunters aren't going to accept anything, regardless of how clean and tidy it is). But what bothers me the most is when a hunter describes situations like that as if they're commonplace instead of exceptions, and perfectly acceptable instead of regrettable. I think that harms our public image as badly as anything else. I think one of the biggest things in our favor is our emphasis on clean, humane kills and respect for the animal. If an honest mistake is made and it doesn't quite happen just right, fine -- but don't talk about it later like it's just another day in the woods. Express some regret about it; discuss it as a learning experience that will make you put more thought and effort into your hunting. And if the hunter in question doesn't feel that regret, or have the desire to do better, then he or she should just stay out of the woods.
                    I daresay I would've been "that guy", and called him out on it more strongly. Not so much because of making a bad shot - who hasn't? - but because of the cavalier way he treated the outcome. Rookie or not, anyone who hunts has a responsibility to represent the hunting community in a positive light. Coming across as a mouth-breather who cares nothing for the game he's pursuing is not the image we want to project.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've gotten into arguments over being too "apologetic" about the more unavoidably gruesome aspects of hunting, so I may be biased, but I think such mishaps are better left concealed. Yes, there's something to be said for honesty, but in some cases what the non-hunting community doesn't know won't hurt it. Personally, I won't tell a non-hunter a hunting story that doesn't have a quick, clean kill. If I make a bad shot, which I try my hardest to avoid, the only people who hear about it are those who I know will understand. It happens, but we shouldn't publicly advertise that fact. I've been saying for some time that what the hunting community needs is a really good PR campaign, and the first commandment of PR is that you need to control the narrative. The more we filter what what the general public knows, the better off we'll be. If that sounds like politics, it's only because it is.

                      As a side note, what concerned me as much as anything about this specific case was that the individual in question professed to be saving up for an AR, like increasing his rate of fire would fix his problems. Somebody get him a good mentor ASAP! He needs to use a single-shot, or better yet a muzzleloader. That will teach him to make his first shot count.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I didn't see that particular post. But I shared a less than perfect recovery story here from a doe that I took in early archery. Is it ammo for the anti-hunters? Sure is. Do I care about that? They're anti-hunters, not really. I do care about the fact that it happened and the animal who was subjected to me having to finish it when I caught up to it. It also served as a caution to others to be very careful about even the seemingly most insignificant little branch in your arrows' path. I thought it was worth sharing.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                          I didn't see that particular post. But I shared a less than perfect recovery story here from a doe that I took in early archery. Is it ammo for the anti-hunters? Sure is. Do I care about that? They're anti-hunters, not really. I do care about the fact that it happened and the animal who was subjected to me having to finish it when I caught up to it. It also served as a caution to others to be very careful about even the seemingly most insignificant little branch in your arrows' path. I thought it was worth sharing.
                          Jcarlin, your experience has been shared by others of us, it is a part of hunting and a fact we have to accept. However, it is not the happening, it is the way it is treated, talked about or how it makes one feel that determines if one is a true hunter or just a killer. I too had a terrible experience concerning a cow elk some years ago that I shared on this site, and I think these feelings of remorse makes us better human beings. Maybe it is too bad that a death of an animal has to bring that betterment out, but I feel that it does somehow serve a purpose. I hope that does not sound too easily stated.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                            I've gotten into arguments over being too "apologetic" about the more unavoidably gruesome aspects of hunting, so I may be biased, but I think such mishaps are better left concealed. Yes, there's something to be said for honesty, but in some cases what the non-hunting community doesn't know won't hurt it. Personally, I won't tell a non-hunter a hunting story that doesn't have a quick, clean kill. If I make a bad shot, which I try my hardest to avoid, the only people who hear about it are those who I know will understand. It happens, but we shouldn't publicly advertise that fact. I've been saying for some time that what the hunting community needs is a really good PR campaign, and the first commandment of PR is that you need to control the narrative. The more we filter what what the general public knows, the better off we'll be. If that sounds like politics, it's only because it is.

                            As a side note, what concerned me as much as anything about this specific case was that the individual in question professed to be saving up for an AR, like increasing his rate of fire would fix his problems. Somebody get him a good mentor ASAP! He needs to use a single-shot, or better yet a muzzleloader. That will teach him to make his first shot count.
                            Well said as always hft.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                              I didn't see that particular post. But I shared a less than perfect recovery story here from a doe that I took in early archery. Is it ammo for the anti-hunters? Sure is. Do I care about that? They're anti-hunters, not really. I do care about the fact that it happened and the animal who was subjected to me having to finish it when I caught up to it. It also served as a caution to others to be very careful about even the seemingly most insignificant little branch in your arrows' path. I thought it was worth sharing.
                              I think your story was a little different, because there was at least some plain old bad luck involved. Sure, you probably should've seen that branch, but we've all done something like that. It happens. This guy was blazing away at running deer 300 yards away. There's a difference between making a mistake and admitting it, and bragging about doing something patently unethical. I will say, I probably wouldn't have shared the story of your doe in a public forum such as this, but I don't fault you for doing so.

                              Comment

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