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I am a squirrel hunter who uses a vest (I know it is heresy to use a vest for squirrels) to put the squirrels in when they make the mistake of standing still for too long. Every time I come in from a successful hunt I wash in cold water the vest and

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  • I am a squirrel hunter who uses a vest (I know it is heresy to use a vest for squirrels) to put the squirrels in when they make the mistake of standing still for too long. Every time I come in from a successful hunt I wash in cold water the vest and

    I am a squirrel hunter who uses a vest (I know it is heresy to use a vest for squirrels) to put the squirrels in when they make the mistake of standing still for too long. Every time I come in from a successful hunt I wash in cold water the vest and then either dry in the dryer, if I am in a hurry to get back out, or let it air dry. Do any of you who use a vest for any kind of game wash it out this frequently or do you just let it go to add a more natural scent? Before anyone asks no I don't just carry the squirrels or use a pin because of wanting to keep my hands free and the density of the woods I hunt in. See first post.

  • #2
    This is typical of what I hunt in.
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    • #3
      I always use a vest for small game, including squirrels. I also like to keep my hands as free as possible not only to be ready for a shot, but to be able to catch myself. I'm not the most graceful creature on the planet. If the vest gets too much blood in it, I'll generally rinse it out and just hang it to dry. It appears that we hunt in similar terrain. Here is a picture of my oldest son fetching a squirrel he shot earlier this fall in the timber we hunt.
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      • #4
        I use a vest when squirrel or rabbit hunting. I keep a plastic bag in it and skin and gut them as I shoot them. It's also helpful to have a bottle of water to drink. I usually give it a wash at the end of the season.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
          I always use a vest for small game, including squirrels. I also like to keep my hands as free as possible not only to be ready for a shot, but to be able to catch myself. I'm not the most graceful creature on the planet. If the vest gets too much blood in it, I'll generally rinse it out and just hang it to dry. It appears that we hunt in similar terrain. Here is a picture of my oldest son fetching a squirrel he shot earlier this fall in the timber we hunt.
          Looks like I would be right at home hunting with you. I am in NE AR and hunt in the White River valley in the foothills of the Ozarks. Come on over any time.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
            I always use a vest for small game, including squirrels. I also like to keep my hands as free as possible not only to be ready for a shot, but to be able to catch myself. I'm not the most graceful creature on the planet. If the vest gets too much blood in it, I'll generally rinse it out and just hang it to dry. It appears that we hunt in similar terrain. Here is a picture of my oldest son fetching a squirrel he shot earlier this fall in the timber we hunt.
            I grew up hunting in southern Missouri. I owe that to my love of squirrel hunting that I still have today. It is still my favorite type of hunting and my boys are both hooked too. We live in central Iowa and people just don't hunt them much here. Too bad, because they are really missing out!

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            • #7
              My dad taught me how to cut a "squirrel stick". I don't know if that is a traditional southern method of carrying squirrels, or if it was just his. I still use it today when I feel nostalgic and taught my boys how to make one too. You take a good sapling that has a strong y branch near the top. Cut the trunk about a foot above the y and about an inch below. Cut the y off about two inches from the trunk and sharpen it. Cut through the skin of the squirrel between the heel and the tendon on the back leg and slide onto the sharpened branch. And...you have a squirrel stick with the trunk as the handle. A vest is much easier and more convenient, but if you want to make a young kid's day, make one of these and let them carry your squirrels around the timber with you.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
                My dad taught me how to cut a "squirrel stick". I don't know if that is a traditional southern method of carrying squirrels, or if it was just his. I still use it today when I feel nostalgic and taught my boys how to make one too. You take a good sapling that has a strong y branch near the top. Cut the trunk about a foot above the y and about an inch below. Cut the y off about two inches from the trunk and sharpen it. Cut through the skin of the squirrel between the heel and the tendon on the back leg and slide onto the sharpened branch. And...you have a squirrel stick with the trunk as the handle. A vest is much easier and more convenient, but if you want to make a young kid's day, make one of these and let them carry your squirrels around the timber with you.
                In my photos, there is a picture labeled "Taking Aim at Another Bushy tail" The squirrels on the ground are attached to that morning's version of a squirrel stick.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
                  I always use a vest for small game, including squirrels. I also like to keep my hands as free as possible not only to be ready for a shot, but to be able to catch myself. I'm not the most graceful creature on the planet. If the vest gets too much blood in it, I'll generally rinse it out and just hang it to dry. It appears that we hunt in similar terrain. Here is a picture of my oldest son fetching a squirrel he shot earlier this fall in the timber we hunt.
                  Yes they are missing out. I think in ways it is more challenging than deer hunting. BTW are you a member of Squirrels Unlimited (squirrelsunlimited.com). An organisation of squirrel hunters from all over.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
                    My dad taught me how to cut a "squirrel stick". I don't know if that is a traditional southern method of carrying squirrels, or if it was just his. I still use it today when I feel nostalgic and taught my boys how to make one too. You take a good sapling that has a strong y branch near the top. Cut the trunk about a foot above the y and about an inch below. Cut the y off about two inches from the trunk and sharpen it. Cut through the skin of the squirrel between the heel and the tendon on the back leg and slide onto the sharpened branch. And...you have a squirrel stick with the trunk as the handle. A vest is much easier and more convenient, but if you want to make a young kid's day, make one of these and let them carry your squirrels around the timber with you.
                    I have seen that used too and it is a thrill for the kids to "help" out. I, however, have always seen the long side used for the squirrel's foot. Not that I would need it with my luck lately.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
                      I always use a vest for small game, including squirrels. I also like to keep my hands as free as possible not only to be ready for a shot, but to be able to catch myself. I'm not the most graceful creature on the planet. If the vest gets too much blood in it, I'll generally rinse it out and just hang it to dry. It appears that we hunt in similar terrain. Here is a picture of my oldest son fetching a squirrel he shot earlier this fall in the timber we hunt.
                      Not only am I not a member, but I have never heard of Squirrels Unlimited. I will definitely check them out as soon as I hit post here. Thanks for the information!

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                      • #12
                        I use a vest or sometimes a fish stringer. The vest and other hunting clothes I don't want to put in the machine I hang up in the shower and use the hand held spray to wash them down - no soap, just warm water.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
                          I always use a vest for small game, including squirrels. I also like to keep my hands as free as possible not only to be ready for a shot, but to be able to catch myself. I'm not the most graceful creature on the planet. If the vest gets too much blood in it, I'll generally rinse it out and just hang it to dry. It appears that we hunt in similar terrain. Here is a picture of my oldest son fetching a squirrel he shot earlier this fall in the timber we hunt.
                          Not a problem at all. I am ozarkghost on there as well. Hope you enjoy.

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                          • #14
                            Bring along some plastic bags. Squirrel into the bag and then the bag into the vest. Just make sure there aren't any holes in the bag.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                              I use a vest or sometimes a fish stringer. The vest and other hunting clothes I don't want to put in the machine I hang up in the shower and use the hand held spray to wash them down - no soap, just warm water.
                              I use my camo backpack that I usually use to carry all my gear for deer season, but when i'm hunting specifically for small game I always bring my vest since my dad taught me to do so, with another bag underneath, since the vest I use for squirrel hunting is also the vest I am using for deer rifle season, so I don't want the scent of squirrel blood to spook the deer. But a backpack with plastic lining or ziploc bags inside will also work if you don't have a vest or anything to carry them with, or don't want to wash your vest constantly. And its hands free.

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