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Folklore yarning question for any who might want to answer. I read a book about a frontiersman back in my youth and something in it stuck with me for past 40 years or so. In the book it describes how this man could get a deer even in the bitterest

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  • Folklore yarning question for any who might want to answer. I read a book about a frontiersman back in my youth and something in it stuck with me for past 40 years or so. In the book it describes how this man could get a deer even in the bitterest

    Folklore yarning question for any who might want to answer. I read a book about a frontiersman back in my youth and something in it stuck with me for past 40 years or so. In the book it describes how this man could get a deer even in the bitterest of winters by going out and using a poncho like blanket sit on the ground spread the poncho out around him and build a very fire in a hole between him and the blanket leaving only his head exposed. The fire was about the size of his hand and enough to keep him from freezing to death. He would then wait for deer to come into range. Is this a reasonable and realistic scene? Would it actually work if it gave off no smoke?

  • #2
    I have a Charheat charcoal heater and it works good. Made in Detroit. They also sell a wool poncho that can be used in severe cold with the heater inside the poncho. Any fumes or smoke is carried up and out of the poncho and does not alert the game. The heater runs for a few hours and I carry a small supply in a plastic bag so I can extend the run time. I start the charcoal at camp in a Weber charcoal starter and then transfer to the heater.
    http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/charheat-heater?a=403594

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    • #3
      I suppose it could if you were careful. You'd need enough fuel under the poncho to keep it going. I do think the smoke of an actual fire would be an issue.

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      • #4
        I guess theoretically it's possible, but how would you keep the blanket from catching on fire? I don't think the smoke would be an issue if you used very dry wood, and kept the fire that small, but a hand-size fire really doesn't give out that much heat. I think that story might be a bit of a stretch.

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        • #5
          Not sure...I'm sure he was extremely well dressed, and the blanket was just to trap any heat the fire put off. It probably would be enough to help sustain body temperature for a long enough period of time. Not sure what he did when it came time to shoot(drop the blanket, etc?). Plus, how did he keep his head warm haha.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
            I guess theoretically it's possible, but how would you keep the blanket from catching on fire? I don't think the smoke would be an issue if you used very dry wood, and kept the fire that small, but a hand-size fire really doesn't give out that much heat. I think that story might be a bit of a stretch.
            I have to disagree on the hand full of fire not being very hot. I have heated water and cooked over a fire that was that size and had plenty of heat to spare. Try it the next time you get a chance you might be surprised.

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            • #7
              Considering how much heat a modern blind traps, it would be plausible that the blanket would hold in some heat. The open flame would be a concern I would think, but maybe it would be more of a smolder with less oxygen inside the blanket. But then, it seems like a smoldering fire would produce more smoke and less heat. JM asks a good question about his head staying warm. Maybe I have an answer: His head got cold, so he tried to stick it into the blanket to get warm while looking out the hole. The smoke built up and got in his eyes until he couldn't see. So from then on, his contraption was known as a "blind". Ok, maybe not...

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              • #8
                4everAutumn points for the humor.

                Guys I think that it would work and for several reasons: getting enough air for combustion would be no problem as you could damp it like a stove or smoker; using dry wood as every outdoorsman that has built fires would know gives off no smoke or very little and what smoke there is would mask any human odor; his head would stay warm as the slit for the head would allow heat to rise out of it and keep his head warm and I would surmise he would wear some kind of hat; surmising where the fire would have to be, between his legs, safety would be my first thought.

                I had just never heard of any one, other than this one instance, using this technique to hunt in the winter. I would only use this method for survival only as a last measure or if I wanted to stay warm and not be found. Any way thanks for participating!

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                • #9
                  I posted in F&S and I still think it is possible and and probably and a little fire can go a long way.

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                  • #10
                    I don't know about the poncho , but I've killed several deer hunting over a twig fire with smoke blowing down wind, smoking cigarettes.

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                    • #11
                      Hi...

                      I believe that a century or so ago that may have not been so uncommon...!!


                      First of all, you would want to wear some kind of hat on your head whether or not it blends in with the poncho (more likely a blanet).


                      A very small fire can create enough heat under the blanket, and smoke can escape through the blanket, or the head 'hole'.



                      If the blanket was wrapped/flared around the hunter, it could be easily loosened to make a shot.

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                      • #12
                        I read the same book, probably, about 55 years ago. Think it was about Daniel Boone and it still holds fascination for me as it does for you. A coonskin hat must be warm and the fire would be warm, but how to sustain it? A small fire must be fed often. Do you do that by feel or hold your breath and peak through the blanket some way, perhaps a hole that acts as heat vent in front of your face. Wool is not easily ignited and you will want something between your butt and the frozen ground. I would use a ridge pole from my feet to the tree I would lean against so the blanket would be stable while you shift knees up and down over time. Even a young man probably cannot sit cross legged for long. The fire would be in the crotch area. The rifle was long and the barrel partially out of the blanket, no doubt, so the blanket must be shed if you want to aim in traditional manner, but if deer were close enough, a crack shot could maybe keep the stock under the blanket and fire by pointing using slow movement or even by using the front sight alone. To me it boils down to keeping the small fire going, other things can be tweaked.

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