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Despite my Tag-name, I have never bowhunted before, and infact, the only thing I have hunted was terrorists and insurgents in Ir

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  • Despite my Tag-name, I have never bowhunted before, and infact, the only thing I have hunted was terrorists and insurgents in Ir

    Despite my Tag-name, I have never bowhunted before, and infact, the only thing I have hunted was terrorists and insurgents in Iraq. I would like to start bowhunting, but have no idea where to begin, or what game to start on. I am wanting to enjoy the thrill of the hunt without the need for a rifle. Any thoughts?

  • #2
    First place to begin is: you need to go to a Bow Hunting Safety Course. You won't be able to get a bow hunting license/tag without the safety course. At the safety course you will meet like-minded people like you and instructors who can point you in the right direction that you are seeking.

    As far as what to hunt: you don't have to limit yourself to land animals. You can use your bow to hunt fish. Game that you can start on are deer, if you like venison. Bear, turkey. elk, moose, antelope, and sheep to name a few other animals to bow hunt for. Hone your skills with the bow and arrow. I believe it is a hunter's responsibility to produce humane kills no matter what he chooses to use whether it is a bow with arrow or a firearm. Good luck!

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    • #3
      I agree with the first response with the exception that the requirement and even availability of a specific bow hunting safety course varies state by state. I'd say to get to a local archery shop and/or local sportsmen's club that has archery shoots, talk to the owner/members about what you want to do and why. Generally hunting and archery are a pretty good community for welcoming beginners and being a serviceman will put you in good standing with the hunting crowd. A shop will normally have good used gear that a decent bowyer should be able to put you on too. Good luck and thanks for serving.

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      • #4
        I would like to add, Thank you for your service to our country. Oh, and good luck in your new pursuit.

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        • #5
          First off, thanks for your service to our country. On the topic of your question, I just got my first bow a couple months ago and am preparing for my first archery deer season this fall. In that short time, I've learned a ton by lots of practice to get to know my bow and built a lot of confidence with it. If you haven't already gotten a bow, the availability of secondhand bows is tremendous and will save you a lot of coin...including on sights, rests, etc. Also, do what you're doing now, ask folks who know. Go to a local sportman's club, archery shop, these websites. Talk to the guys at the shop while they tune or inspect your set up...make sure you're getting the right arrows and such for your rig. Get online and google archery, bow tuning, bowhunting, etc. and you'll find a world of info on everything from bows and gear to scents and tactics. Good luck.

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          • #6
            The local bow shop is probably your best bet. They will know what you need and you can probably find out more from them than anyone on here. They can tell you stuff about your state and area. If you care to let us know where you live maybe someone here from your area could point you in the right direction.

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            • #7
              The only bowhunters safety course you need is if your state requires it. Try to partner up with an experienced archer. Look at local regulations fo example my state requires you to use at a minimum 100 gr broadheads with 7/8 or ove cutting diameter.
              I'm new to arhery as well. I'll be hunting deer with it this October.
              Do you plan to use a ground blind or Tree stand?
              I've used a product in the past called buck bomb and it works pretty good and come in an array of scents for early season to rut. Dominant buck is a good one to have in my AO.
              Keep it simple and light when you go out. I plan on taking my bow and 3 arrows with muzzy mx-3 broadheads and a knife. BDU's or Brand Name Camo works just as well.
              If you can scout and preposition your hide/ stand a week or 2 out. If you use a stand get a good quality cable lock or chain.
              Wild life Research has a great line of scent killer , so does dead down wind.
              You have awesome gear in you CIF issue (Silk weights, 550 cord, etc). Don't blow your budget on stuff you have at your disposal

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              • #8
                I forgot... Practice Practice Practice... You are used to using peep sights so you already have an advantage and should help you quickly gain confidence. I know that my familiarization with peep sights helped me out. Paper tune your bow as well. I was told by an experienced archer to sight in and practice at 20 feet to build confidence when shootin a block and to paper tune. Then work my way up in distance. Also an advantage you have is the use of silouhetrtes (25 meter) zero targets. Some blocks are set up to reflact a further distance than you actuallly are.

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                • #9
                  Bow hunting is the BEST way to start. It teaches you several things that "gun" hunting can not. You must be extremely quiet, sit for hours with hardly any movement, able to 'attract' deer in even without a bait pile. Most important the bow will teach you that every shot MUST be a direct hit; it makes you focus and assure that your 'on target'.

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                  • #10
                    For any hunter out there seeking a better shot with their bow; this is it! http://www.peepeliminator.com

                    I found myself hating bow season and loving rifle because I was a better shot; well someone invented a rifle site for a bow and I was DEAD ON the first 4 arrows I shot. My confidence is back and you can bet I'll be posting my picture with my bow.

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                    • #11
                      The first step in buying a bow (if you havent bought one yet) is determing your draw length. I suggest visiting a local bow shop and be professionally measured. The bow will only shoot as good as it fits. Once you have determined your draw length, you know have to consider what draw weight you will be shooting. The technician at the bow shop will also help you determine draw weight. The final step in the bow fitting is shooting several makes and models. Dont over power your bow, lots of us can pull an 80 pound bow and it makes for a super fast arrow, but an 60 lb bow is a lot easier in 20 degree rainy ttemps than the 80# and shoots almost as fast. Pick a poundage you'll be comfortable with at any temperature, angle or position. Pratice shooting your bow every day if possible, it's unfair for game to be hunted by a archer who's unsure if he can hit the game. Finding the area to hunt shoulod just be a click away, find public land or join a lease and scout the area you plan to hunt. I use terraserver.com, topomaps.usgs.gov and other online sites that give me an overhead view to help with my ground work while scouting. Then get into the woods looking for deer travel lanes between bedding and feeding areas. Try to find a tree or area down wind of travel lanes or other deer sign to put a tree stand or blind. Lastly study and read as you are, forums, books, magazines and any other means to learn as much about the woods and the game you go after. I've hunted for over 43 years and still crave any knowledge that will help me become a better hunter / naturalist.

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                      • #12
                        First, I am glad you are back safe and picking up a lifelong interest such as bowhunting. Thanks for your service.

                        As far as game to pursue, depending on where you live, you can't go wrong with deer. Here in Missouri, we get a three month long season. I picked up bowhunting to increase the amount of time I could spend in the field (now I am hooked).

                        I am also a lot more comfortable bowhunting public land due to both the crowds and safety concerns.

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                        • #13
                          First of all thank you for your service in the marines. If i were you i would go to my local hunting shop and talk to the specialist there.

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