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I've never bow-hunted deer, and I want to begin this year or next. I like simplicity and tradition and I'd rather not use a compound bow, but everyone I mention this to acts like I'm an idiot. I understand that there's a great deal more skill invo

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  • I've never bow-hunted deer, and I want to begin this year or next. I like simplicity and tradition and I'd rather not use a compound bow, but everyone I mention this to acts like I'm an idiot. I understand that there's a great deal more skill invo

    I've never bow-hunted deer, and I want to begin this year or next. I like simplicity and tradition and I'd rather not use a compound bow, but everyone I mention this to acts like I'm an idiot. I understand that there's a great deal more skill involved with a recurve, and that it's typically something you take up after using a compound for a number of years. To me, though, it just seems like simple logic that if I have the time to practice, which I do, I can be entirely effective with a recurve without starting with a compound. So I put it to you guys: Am I, in fact, delusional? Feel free to throw in any other tips on the subject, too.

  • #2
    Tioughnioga,
    You're coming at it the right way. I picked up a recurve a couple of years ago, but really haven't spent sufficient time with it. I occasionally shoot it in the off season, but when it's go time, I trust myself with my compound and that's what comes to the woods with me. But that's me, and the admitted lack of effort I've put into that bow.

    If you have the time and are putting in the practice, just make sure you are comfortable with the ranges you intend to shoot and then stick to that plan when hunting.

    Regarding the "compound first" approach. It's so different that I don't see it. I think if you can shoot a recurve, the learning curve on a compound is probably pretty steep. I don't think the reverse is true, but that's just my opinion and experience.

    Comment


    • #3
      Not to be a smart---, but up until very recently it was the other way around. People shot traditional bows before learning to shoot a compound. Decent compound bows for hunting have been around for what, 40 years? There is no reason you can't learn to shoot a recurve first, but my personal suggestion would be to shoot a compound. If possible I'd have someone help teach you to shoot. Being a beginner is the best time to form both good and bad habits....think of it like training a dog. I've owned a recurve for years and I really never bring it hunting. Reason being that I am just so much more accurate with my compound bow.

      Comment


      • #4
        Tioughnioga, if you are serious about shooting traditional equipment, then start
        out with it, not with the compound first. There are differences in form between
        the two bows, so why learn one way and then have to break habits. Start with
        the recurve, get used to it. The compound is much easier to shoot with far less
        practice time and if you get used to the compound first, it may be harder to make
        the switch. Do not attempt to learn traditional form by yourself. There are many
        archery clubs available to you for help from experienced traditional shooters who
        are more than happy to give you help, the trick is to find a qualified one who can start
        you with the correct information. There is much more to learn in this form of
        archery than in compound shooting. That is why most people tell you that you
        are an idiot when not shooting a compound. It takes practice and more practice
        to become good enough to hunt traditionally and you must be true to your desire
        in order to stick with it. If you want to do something that not everyone wants to
        put the time into, then traditional archery is for you. I have loved it for over 40 years
        and I know you will too if you stick to it ! I only wish that I could give you more
        help in getting you started. I will be more than happy to answer any questions
        that you may ask !!

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the encouragement, fellas. I'll surely take your advice and probably be asking for more from time to time.

          Comment


          • #6
            If you want simplicity, I suggest you start with a reflex deflex longbow it is more forgiving than a recurve and delight to carry afield. Don't over-bow start with a bow around 50 lb @ 28" draw. Jim Reynolds, Thunderstick archery, in my opinion, makes some of the finest custom bows at a reasonable price.
            Don't encumber the bow with a quiver; I carry my arrows in a hip or back quiver, (Catquiver). A 2 blade broadhead works best I prefer either Zwickey or Grizzly, which I shoot in practice and sharpen those heads for hunting.
            The best instructional book on instinctive shooting is "Instinctive Shooting II" by G. Fred Asbell. Make sure you learn to shoot instinctively and don't fall into any of the tricks/traps like gap shooting or aiming down the arrow; these will be very frustrating and hard to break.
            I've lost count of the deer that have fallen to my bow.
            You are wise starting with a bow that does not have training wheels.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
              If you want simplicity, I suggest you start with a reflex deflex longbow it is more forgiving than a recurve and delight to carry afield. Don't over-bow start with a bow around 50 lb @ 28" draw. Jim Reynolds, Thunderstick archery, in my opinion, makes some of the finest custom bows at a reasonable price.
              Don't encumber the bow with a quiver; I carry my arrows in a hip or back quiver, (Catquiver). A 2 blade broadhead works best I prefer either Zwickey or Grizzly, which I shoot in practice and sharpen those heads for hunting.
              The best instructional book on instinctive shooting is "Instinctive Shooting II" by G. Fred Asbell. Make sure you learn to shoot instinctively and don't fall into any of the tricks/traps like gap shooting or aiming down the arrow; these will be very frustrating and hard to break.
              I've lost count of the deer that have fallen to my bow.
              You are wise starting with a bow that does not have training wheels.
              Tioughnnioga, this information that Charlie gives you is excellent, the Asbell book he mentions is a great
              starting point for you and his choice of the reflex-deflex bow is also very good. I wish you the best in your
              new venture.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
                If you want simplicity, I suggest you start with a reflex deflex longbow it is more forgiving than a recurve and delight to carry afield. Don't over-bow start with a bow around 50 lb @ 28" draw. Jim Reynolds, Thunderstick archery, in my opinion, makes some of the finest custom bows at a reasonable price.
                Don't encumber the bow with a quiver; I carry my arrows in a hip or back quiver, (Catquiver). A 2 blade broadhead works best I prefer either Zwickey or Grizzly, which I shoot in practice and sharpen those heads for hunting.
                The best instructional book on instinctive shooting is "Instinctive Shooting II" by G. Fred Asbell. Make sure you learn to shoot instinctively and don't fall into any of the tricks/traps like gap shooting or aiming down the arrow; these will be very frustrating and hard to break.
                I've lost count of the deer that have fallen to my bow.
                You are wise starting with a bow that does not have training wheels.
                Thank you, Richard. Charlie, would you have a link for Jim Reynolds, or even a number or address? My Google search for Thunderstick bows took me to a site called First-Lost Nation and a listing of used bows ... wasn't sure if that was Reynolds's site or something more like a swap-meet kind of site.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
                  Tioughnioga, if you are serious about shooting traditional equipment, then start
                  out with it, not with the compound first. There are differences in form between
                  the two bows, so why learn one way and then have to break habits. Start with
                  the recurve, get used to it. The compound is much easier to shoot with far less
                  practice time and if you get used to the compound first, it may be harder to make
                  the switch. Do not attempt to learn traditional form by yourself. There are many
                  archery clubs available to you for help from experienced traditional shooters who
                  are more than happy to give you help, the trick is to find a qualified one who can start
                  you with the correct information. There is much more to learn in this form of
                  archery than in compound shooting. That is why most people tell you that you
                  are an idiot when not shooting a compound. It takes practice and more practice
                  to become good enough to hunt traditionally and you must be true to your desire
                  in order to stick with it. If you want to do something that not everyone wants to
                  put the time into, then traditional archery is for you. I have loved it for over 40 years
                  and I know you will too if you stick to it ! I only wish that I could give you more
                  help in getting you started. I will be more than happy to answer any questions
                  that you may ask !!
                  Encouragement like this is the best kind of help. Thanks!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
                    If you want simplicity, I suggest you start with a reflex deflex longbow it is more forgiving than a recurve and delight to carry afield. Don't over-bow start with a bow around 50 lb @ 28" draw. Jim Reynolds, Thunderstick archery, in my opinion, makes some of the finest custom bows at a reasonable price.
                    Don't encumber the bow with a quiver; I carry my arrows in a hip or back quiver, (Catquiver). A 2 blade broadhead works best I prefer either Zwickey or Grizzly, which I shoot in practice and sharpen those heads for hunting.
                    The best instructional book on instinctive shooting is "Instinctive Shooting II" by G. Fred Asbell. Make sure you learn to shoot instinctively and don't fall into any of the tricks/traps like gap shooting or aiming down the arrow; these will be very frustrating and hard to break.
                    I've lost count of the deer that have fallen to my bow.
                    You are wise starting with a bow that does not have training wheels.
                    Thunder Stick Archery – http://www.thunderstickbows.com/
                    445 North Stine Rd.
                    Charlotte, MI 48813 USA
                    Contact: Jim Reynolds
                    Phone: 517-543-8167
                    E-mail: [email protected]

                    This is the last contact info I had for Jim. Could not get to his website don't know if it's down temporarily or moved somewhere else.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
                      If you want simplicity, I suggest you start with a reflex deflex longbow it is more forgiving than a recurve and delight to carry afield. Don't over-bow start with a bow around 50 lb @ 28" draw. Jim Reynolds, Thunderstick archery, in my opinion, makes some of the finest custom bows at a reasonable price.
                      Don't encumber the bow with a quiver; I carry my arrows in a hip or back quiver, (Catquiver). A 2 blade broadhead works best I prefer either Zwickey or Grizzly, which I shoot in practice and sharpen those heads for hunting.
                      The best instructional book on instinctive shooting is "Instinctive Shooting II" by G. Fred Asbell. Make sure you learn to shoot instinctively and don't fall into any of the tricks/traps like gap shooting or aiming down the arrow; these will be very frustrating and hard to break.
                      I've lost count of the deer that have fallen to my bow.
                      You are wise starting with a bow that does not have training wheels.
                      My favorite is Jim's Thunderstick 3; 61 inches 56 lbs. @28 inch draw. You may want to watch EBay in case Jim has retired.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just in case you'd like a little more incentive here are some pics of a few of the bucks my Thunderstick killed.
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          No where does it say what is best for you,no where is it specified how you should hunt.If starting with a recurve or long bow makes you happy and spikes your interest by all means go for it.When I was a young hunter thats all that was available,compounds weren't invented.Recutves and long bows have taken more game than compounds will in a thousand years.Its ok to teach your self,but help is plentiful as archers are a helpful bunch.Be careful shooting flying targets,but it can be done. Good luck

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            No where does it say what is best for you,no where is it specified how you should hunt.If starting with a recurve or long bow makes you happy and spikes your interest by all means go for it.When I was a young hunter thats all that was available,compounds weren't invented.Recutves and long bows have taken more game than compounds will in a thousand years.Its ok to teach your self,but help is plentiful as archers are a helpful bunch.Be careful shooting flying targets,but it can be done. Good luck

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              No where does it say what is best for you,no where is it specified how you should hunt.If starting with a recurve or long bow makes you happy and spikes your interest by all means go for it.When I was a young hunter thats all that was available,compounds weren't invented.Recutves and long bows have taken more game than compounds will in a thousand years.Its ok to teach your self,but help is plentiful as archers are a helpful bunch.Be careful shooting flying targets,but it can be done. Good luck

                              Comment

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