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Cross training with traditional and compound bows. I've taken two deer with my compound this past week (I'll keep saying it because I'm coming off a two year slump) and in replaying the shots in my head something has jumped out at me. I rose, drew,

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  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    Are you calling 'traditional' a recurve or is it a long bow?
    Traditional is either longbow or a recurve. And there is just as much dispute between the two sometimes as
    there is between traditional and compounds. There are very deep feelings both ways in the sport.

    Leave a comment:


  • Milldawg
    replied
    Yes I think it does. I learned with a recurve and instinctive sighting. And the got an old compound with a peep but it had pins. And I got very good with it. When I finally grew up and bought a bow with a peep I had to learn how to shoot again. The instinctive method makes you focus on your anchor point and I think there's less to think about less to line up for sure. But knowing you have to have your anchor point set makes you a better shot. You can everything else down but with a good anchor you ain't got squat.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
    Are you calling 'traditional' a recurve or is it a long bow?
    I'm using a recurve. I don't own a self-bow.
    Can't say I'm much of a purist and if I have to hand in my card, so be it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Are you calling 'traditional' a recurve or is it a long bow?

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    Just for the record, I still don't trust myself with the recurve enough to hunt with it.
    Fair enough. I admit, there are "idiots among us"(One of my favorite series of Hurteau articles btw if no one had ever come across them). I just hate when it causes more hoops for the rest of us, assuming I'm the rest of us.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    Just for the record, I still don't trust myself with the recurve enough to hunt with it.
    To me the practice of either benefits the muscle control and hand eye coordination. I shoot instinct and used to practice all year. In N.Y. you need a license endorsement for archery which is a mandatory day of lecture and also shooting at a target - I think it was 25yds if I remember. Don't know if that is still a requirement but I think if it is it's a good idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    Just for the record, I still don't trust myself with the recurve enough to hunt with it.
    All that being said, I still don't really agree with a need for certification. Partly it's because you should trust adults to judge for themselves, partly because the world doesn't need more regulation.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    Just for the record, I still don't trust myself with the recurve enough to hunt with it.
    Good advice.
    I still haven't put the time into it I should. Picking it up on day 1, I feel like I started where I was day 1 with a compound. The difference being that after a few sessions with a compound, I felt confident out to a hunting range of 20 yards all those years ago. Having spent a few sessions with the recurve, there is progress, but not enough to gamble a deer's pain on.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    I would agree only very generally. Shooting a traditional bow well requires much more attention to detail and concentration than a compound, so in that regard I could see it being helpful. But when it comes to more specific things such as aiming and release time, I'm not sure there's a correlation. You really have to execute the shot differently with a compound than with a recurve. It obviously worked out this year, but I don't think shooting faster is necessarily better with a compound. That's my take anyway.
    I see your point huntfishtrap. We shall see what happens with more awareness. In practice, I still think I'm a fairly deliberate shooter with my compound. Under what passes for stress in this situation I seemed to have blended the two approached. I was not, however, unhappy with the result.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    I would agree only very generally. Shooting a traditional bow well requires much more attention to detail and concentration than a compound, so in that regard I could see it being helpful. But when it comes to more specific things such as aiming and release time, I'm not sure there's a correlation. You really have to execute the shot differently with a compound than with a recurve. It obviously worked out this year, but I don't think shooting faster is necessarily better with a compound. That's my take anyway.
    I must admit that I am a poor adviser on what is good or bad regarding the use of a compound in as much as
    I am totally a instinctive recurve shooter. So I guess one could disregard any information I give since it might
    not apply. I do agree with your caution as to shooting too fast and that time should be taken in getting a good
    sight picture before arrow release. Most of us will adapt to the best method of shooting that fits each of us.
    However, I do very much like reading the different strategs that we all have.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    I would agree only very generally. Shooting a traditional bow well requires much more attention to detail and concentration than a compound, so in that regard I could see it being helpful. But when it comes to more specific things such as aiming and release time, I'm not sure there's a correlation. You really have to execute the shot differently with a compound than with a recurve. It obviously worked out this year, but I don't think shooting faster is necessarily better with a compound. That's my take anyway.
    I can see how acquiring the target quicker and more fluidly with a compound could be a benefit of shooting instinctively. I would just add one caution, and that's to make sure you don't shoot too fast with the compound. You really want to make sure that you take at least a second to settle the pin on the target, because if you're in the habit of shooting quickly anyway, it's very easy to just sweep the pin over the chest and punch the trigger when you have a touch of buck fever. Aim small, miss small.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    Just for the record, I still don't trust myself with the recurve enough to hunt with it.
    That should have been your achievement will give you a feeling that is unbelievable. Sorry about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    Just for the record, I still don't trust myself with the recurve enough to hunt with it.
    That is a wise thing to say and have knowledge of, jacarlin. Instinctive recurve shooting is very challenging and
    thus very rewarding when one comes proficient enough to hunt with one. However, the fitst thought one should
    have is that of the animal. That is not to say there will not be lost animals from traditional users, but if one does
    the required work (practice) one can feel better maybe if it happens. Some time back we had a good discusion
    here regarding certification in bow hunting and I said some things that were not too accepted as to my feelings
    regarding said certification. Your feeling of not enough trust is music to my ears and I respect you highly for that.
    I hope for your sake that some day you will take a animal with your recurve, your acheivment will be unbeleivable.
    Good luck, jacarlin.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by JM View Post
    Yes, I've had similar situations. Shooting traditional has made me a much better compound bow shooter. I've been told black powder has a similar effect on gun hunting because you know you only have one shot and need to be careful of shot selection.
    I guess that in some way comes around to all shooting making one a better shooter if only because they all emphasize follow through.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Just for the record, I still don't trust myself with the recurve enough to hunt with it.

    Leave a comment:

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