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Cross training with traditional and compound bows. I've taken two deer with my compound this past week (I'll keep saying it because I'm coming off a two year slump) and in replaying the shots in my head something has jumped out at me. I rose, drew,

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  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    I would agree only very generally. Shooting a traditional bow well requires much more attention to detail and concentration than a compound, so in that regard I could see it being helpful. But when it comes to more specific things such as aiming and release time, I'm not sure there's a correlation. You really have to execute the shot differently with a compound than with a recurve. It obviously worked out this year, but I don't think shooting faster is necessarily better with a compound. That's my take anyway.
    And I think that's what I'm seeing. I've picked up a bit of the low draw as it rises to my cheek in one motion, which really is a lot more economical, and I still find my pin, but I'm not doing it as another completely separate action. Go back a year and it was raise and extend bow. Slowly come to draw. Aim. Fight hammering heart for a moment. Release and hold.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
    Jacarlin, I notice you stated you shoot with a pin with the compound, but did
    not mention if you shoot instictive with the recurve or also with a pin. In
    shooting instinctive with traditional equipment the so called aiming is done
    by picking a spot before drawing the bow, looking only at that spot and
    when the bow hand drops into position the arrow is released when the anchor
    hand touches the anchor point. With that type of free draw and release it
    releives much tension in the shot, is much more fluid. If one gets totally
    into instinctive shooting, I can see that it would also help a compound sight
    shooter too. I have heard of sight shooters having trouble releasing the
    arrow due to target panic, that does not happen with instinctive shooters.
    I would definetly think that shooting your recurve in this manner would
    aide you in your compond shooting as well. However, if you have already
    taken two deer this year, I would have to say you are doing alright , congrats !
    Thanks,
    No pin on my recurve. And I have to admit I hadn't thought that difference through as much as I could have.
    Regarding the two deer. I started bowhunting just about 10 o 12 years ago in my late 20's. I took my first two deer with a bow 3 seasons ago and thought "Well, there will be a price in cold unproductive mornings for that." Next year I got very little time in field. Last year I had plenty of opportunities. Blew a couple of shots (cleanly under animals at least)and finished my season with an arrow coming apart on release, but at least I wasn't injured.
    This year I put my time in in practice, but was a little limited on woods time. That said, I've taken 4 archery deer in the last 4 seasons, but none for the first 6 or 7 years I went out. I'd like to think I learned a lot of hard lessons. We shall see.
    Part of the point of the long winded response. 2 in 4 days is a fluke, I'm nothing to brag about over the long haul.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    I would agree only very generally. Shooting a traditional bow well requires much more attention to detail and concentration than a compound, so in that regard I could see it being helpful. But when it comes to more specific things such as aiming and release time, I'm not sure there's a correlation. You really have to execute the shot differently with a compound than with a recurve. It obviously worked out this year, but I don't think shooting faster is necessarily better with a compound. That's my take anyway.
    That is a very good point huntfishtrap, traditional shooting is quicker,, since instictive shooting is like throwing
    a ball, all hand to eye coordination. The compound is not shot in this manner, however, getting used to this
    form of shooting, I think could help a compound shooter get on target a little quicker and maybe help in
    making things a little more fluid. But then it all depends on the shooter, some pick it up and some don't. That
    is probably why not everyone shoots traditional bows.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Jacarlin, I notice you stated you shoot with a pin with the compound, but did
    not mention if you shoot instictive with the recurve or also with a pin. In
    shooting instinctive with traditional equipment the so called aiming is done
    by picking a spot before drawing the bow, looking only at that spot and
    when the bow hand drops into position the arrow is released when the anchor
    hand touches the anchor point. With that type of free draw and release it
    releives much tension in the shot, is much more fluid. If one gets totally
    into instinctive shooting, I can see that it would also help a compound sight
    shooter too. I have heard of sight shooters having trouble releasing the
    arrow due to target panic, that does not happen with instinctive shooters.
    I would definetly think that shooting your recurve in this manner would
    aide you in your compond shooting as well. However, if you have already
    taken two deer this year, I would have to say you are doing alright , congrats !

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    I would agree only very generally. Shooting a traditional bow well requires much more attention to detail and concentration than a compound, so in that regard I could see it being helpful. But when it comes to more specific things such as aiming and release time, I'm not sure there's a correlation. You really have to execute the shot differently with a compound than with a recurve. It obviously worked out this year, but I don't think shooting faster is necessarily better with a compound. That's my take anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • JM
    replied
    Yes, I've had similar situations. Shooting traditional has made me a much better compound bow shooter. I've been told black powder has a similar effect on gun hunting because you know you only have one shot and need to be careful of shot selection.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cross training with traditional and compound bows. I've taken two deer with my compound this past week (I'll keep saying it because I'm coming off a two year slump) and in replaying the shots in my head something has jumped out at me. I rose, drew,

    Cross training with traditional and compound bows. I've taken two deer with my compound this past week (I'll keep saying it because I'm coming off a two year slump) and in replaying the shots in my head something has jumped out at me. I rose, drew, and fired more smoothly and quickly than I can recall from the past and probably had pin on target for a fraction of a second before releasing. Early in the season I was practicing (read as "still learning") with my recurve a good bit, which is different than most years as well. I believe that practice to have made a difference with my compound draw and firing sequence. Does anyone have any experience with this? Opinions good, bad, or indifferent?

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