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I have spent the last three years working on my form in archery so I can hunt for the first time. I am going out next September, but I don't know where to look and what to expect. Im in Washington state and trying to understand the laws of hunting, a

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  • I have spent the last three years working on my form in archery so I can hunt for the first time. I am going out next September, but I don't know where to look and what to expect. Im in Washington state and trying to understand the laws of hunting, a

    I have spent the last three years working on my form in archery so I can hunt for the first time. I am going out next September, but I don't know where to look and what to expect. Im in Washington state and trying to understand the laws of hunting, and find a place to start scouting. I don't have a lot of gear and any help will be appreciated.

  • #2
    You're on the right website for help. Huntfishtrap, charlie elk, Kody, etc. are all amateur hunters that frequent this website(just messing with them, they are all very experienced and most likely all know more than I do).
    -The best part about hunting is that you will NEVER know what to expect. I have been hunting my entire life and there are still surprises every time I go out. The best course of action for you would be finding the website and phone number to your Fish&Game/Conservation department. They should be able to point you towards public hunting land, etc. Public land is a great place to learn. They should be able to clarify any confusing laws. You may get lucky and find someone on public land who can help you find a spot. What would you like to hunt? I'm not very familiar with Washington. Camouflage clothing would help, but the main thing is wearing weather appropriate clothing. A simple way to get around not owning "hunting clothes" would be to set up a little blind/wall in front of you. If you own a camo blanket or fabric you could easily make one yourself.

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    • #3
      That's a very broad question, so I'll do my best to give you some pointers without writing a essay.
      - Laws - can't help you there. I would pick up a copy of your hunting regulations, and if you're confused about something, call your local conservation officer. Most of the time CO's are very happy to help with that kind of thing.
      - As far as finding a place, I'd start with public land, like JM said. Once you get your feet wet, you might want to move on to asking permission to hunt private land, but for a first-timer, public will usually be less hassle, unless it's a highly-pressured area. I looked briefly at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife website, and I see they have a nifty feature called GoHunt!, where you can find public land and explore harvest data. You should find a lot of useful info there. Here's the link I used, if you need it: http://apps.wdfw.wa.gov/gohunt/. The WDFW website also has the hunting regs, if you can't find a paper copy.
      - For gear, you don't need a ton to get started, despite what the hunting gear manufacturers would have you believe. All you really need is a bow and the necessary accessories like arrows, broadheads, etc., and some decent clothing. You don't really have to have camo, though it's helpful. You can get by with dull, solid colors, like brown or dark gray or dark green. And you want good footwear - that's one thing I would not advise skimping on. It's hard for me to be much more specific than that without knowing what kind of game you will be pursuing. Hope that helps, and feel free to ask if you have any more questions.

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      • #4
        Washington is a diverse state with a lot opportunities. What are you interested in hunting- bear, deer, elk? What region of Washington are planning to hunt? What type of archery gear; recurve, longbow or compound?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
          That's a very broad question, so I'll do my best to give you some pointers without writing a essay.
          - Laws - can't help you there. I would pick up a copy of your hunting regulations, and if you're confused about something, call your local conservation officer. Most of the time CO's are very happy to help with that kind of thing.
          - As far as finding a place, I'd start with public land, like JM said. Once you get your feet wet, you might want to move on to asking permission to hunt private land, but for a first-timer, public will usually be less hassle, unless it's a highly-pressured area. I looked briefly at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife website, and I see they have a nifty feature called GoHunt!, where you can find public land and explore harvest data. You should find a lot of useful info there. Here's the link I used, if you need it: http://apps.wdfw.wa.gov/gohunt/. The WDFW website also has the hunting regs, if you can't find a paper copy.
          - For gear, you don't need a ton to get started, despite what the hunting gear manufacturers would have you believe. All you really need is a bow and the necessary accessories like arrows, broadheads, etc., and some decent clothing. You don't really have to have camo, though it's helpful. You can get by with dull, solid colors, like brown or dark gray or dark green. And you want good footwear - that's one thing I would not advise skimping on. It's hard for me to be much more specific than that without knowing what kind of game you will be pursuing. Hope that helps, and feel free to ask if you have any more questions.
          One other thing regarding clothes. If you're on a budget, military surplus camo is a really good option. You can often find good quality military surplus camo for far less money than comparable "traditional" hunting clothing. Some good companies I've used for military surplus gear include Coleman's, Sportsman's Guide, and Cheaper Than Dirt.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hello native archery, good scouting has plenty to do with meeting farmers and landowners and getting permission to hunt their land. Where might that land be? While driving through areas you think hold promise you will see many pasture lands bordered with forest and bush areas. If you are scouting this winter when hunting season has ended and the deer are not feeling that pressure, you will see them feeding in some of those fields. It is a good time to get things set for next season. Pull into the farm yard, pet the dog and knock on the door. Believe me, that is the most important first step in finding good hunting locations. Generally, farmers and small landholders respect the fellow that respects them enough to be asking permission. Don't be discouraged by refusals just head down the road and try again. Bowhunters as opposed to rifle hunters probably have an advantage in gaining consent as the livestock in the neighbouring field is safely out of range. As for hunting clothing, huntfishtrap's suggestions are right on. I guarantee more deer are taken by guys wearing blue jeans despite what Cabela's would have you believe.

            Comment


            • #7
              Since you did not state which form of archery you intend to use, I will
              assume it is traditional archery in as much as you did state you have
              spent the last three years working on your form. It would only take a
              matter of less than an hour or so with a compound and since there is
              no form at all with a crossbow (with the exception of exercising your
              triger finger) I will count that out. With traditional equipment, you will
              be hunting in very close proximity to your game and the most important
              thing in that respect is quietness, and I mean quiet !!!! Most store
              bought camo is too noisy. There is a lot of movement involved in
              drawing traditional bows and with movement there is noise. It may
              not sound audible to the hunter, but it is certainly audible to a deer
              inside of 15-20 yards and that should be your shooting distance with a
              traditional bow. I have always used cotton clothing and anything in
              mixed greens, browns, blacks and even dark yellows. Put adhesive
              felt strips on your bow limbs where the string hits the limb close to the
              tips. Your biggest area of trouble will be learning when to draw on a
              animal as their eyes are set on the side of the head and their vision to
              the side is remarkable, this will take much trial and error to learn, your
              patience will be tasked in this respect !! Put string quieters on your bow
              string and learn to shoot a little low as deer are prone to jumping the
              string of a slower arrow from traditional bows. The first move of a deer
              is down and many deer are missed over the back and they can change
              directions and elude an arrow quicker than you can blink !!! You are
              entering a very challenging form of hunting and I respect you for your
              efforts if you continue with this challenge. Good luck to you and I hope
              you stay true to this endevore.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
                Since you did not state which form of archery you intend to use, I will
                assume it is traditional archery in as much as you did state you have
                spent the last three years working on your form. It would only take a
                matter of less than an hour or so with a compound and since there is
                no form at all with a crossbow (with the exception of exercising your
                triger finger) I will count that out. With traditional equipment, you will
                be hunting in very close proximity to your game and the most important
                thing in that respect is quietness, and I mean quiet !!!! Most store
                bought camo is too noisy. There is a lot of movement involved in
                drawing traditional bows and with movement there is noise. It may
                not sound audible to the hunter, but it is certainly audible to a deer
                inside of 15-20 yards and that should be your shooting distance with a
                traditional bow. I have always used cotton clothing and anything in
                mixed greens, browns, blacks and even dark yellows. Put adhesive
                felt strips on your bow limbs where the string hits the limb close to the
                tips. Your biggest area of trouble will be learning when to draw on a
                animal as their eyes are set on the side of the head and their vision to
                the side is remarkable, this will take much trial and error to learn, your
                patience will be tasked in this respect !! Put string quieters on your bow
                string and learn to shoot a little low as deer are prone to jumping the
                string of a slower arrow from traditional bows. The first move of a deer
                is down and many deer are missed over the back and they can change
                directions and elude an arrow quicker than you can blink !!! You are
                entering a very challenging form of hunting and I respect you for your
                efforts if you continue with this challenge. Good luck to you and I hope
                you stay true to this endevore.
                I have spent 45 years hunting with a recurve and there is much more to learn than what I have
                written. I have not covered nearly everything, so if you have further questions please ask, I will
                be glad to help if I can. The most important thing with traditional archery is practice and when you
                think you have done enough, practice some more. Keep that bow in your hands until it is part of
                you. Again, good luck.

                Comment

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