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What arrow grain should I get my Beman ICS Hunter arrows for a 45# and 26" draw length Barnet Vortex for deer? What grain for my broadheads?

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  • bobadams123
    replied
    Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
    Huntfishtrap gave some great advice and I'll add my 2 cents: A lighter weight arrow will give you more speed and increase your range to make a hit, but a heavier arrow will give you better momentum for more penetration. Obviously, with heavier arrows, you will have to take closer shots, but you will get better results after you hit the deer. Heavier arrows are harder to stop than lighter ones.
    My son shoots 45 lbs with the same arrow but his draw length is shorter and we have him shooting 125 gr tips. We found that was good weight for him. You want front on center be at least 17% for the best penetration and accuracy. the arrow stiffness has big part in it to. My sons arrows are the beman ics 340 it also matters if shoot veins or feathers. veins are heavier which will cange you foc you would have to go heavier tip. My brother shoots 50 lbs bow 336 gr tip using beman 300 for his turkey bow experiment with it and see what way shoots the best with your bow.

    Leave a comment:


  • officerdom1987
    replied
    DeerHunter08, keep this in mind, SIMPLICITY!!! A three prong site is plenty to help get your understanding of depth perception. A whisker biscuit is also another great buy to understand nocking and not have to worry about dropping your arrow. The rubber hair looking string silencers are also a cheap buy. As for broadheads, Muzzy 100gr 4-blades are a great and durable made tool. A word of advice! Make sure your practice tips and broadheads are the same grain, and put a little bit of grease on the threads so that if you do shoot into the dirt, the dirt won't cake the tip and cause you to not be able to unscrew it. Ted Nugent uses 45lbs. of draw weight and he drops plenty of animals, check with your state's game laws on if there is a minimum. That's about all I think, we got ya covered.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    Originally posted by 4everAutumn View Post
    Huntfishtrap gave some great advice and I'll add my 2 cents: A lighter weight arrow will give you more speed and increase your range to make a hit, but a heavier arrow will give you better momentum for more penetration. Obviously, with heavier arrows, you will have to take closer shots, but you will get better results after you hit the deer. Heavier arrows are harder to stop than lighter ones.
    Yeah, I wasn't sure where to go as far as speed vs. weight for someone shooting 45 pounds. That's why I kind of went with a middle-of-the-road recommendation. I use heavy arrows, and highly recommend them for anyone shooter a higher poundage, but when you're only drawing 45 pounds, a heavy arrow is going to be very, very slow. I think a compromise is probably best.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    You generally want to stay above 5 grains per inch, and 6 is better. To figure the total arrow weight, just multiply the length of the arrows by the grains per inch. You can find what GPI your arrows are by either looking on the box, or on the manufacturer's website. For example, if your arrows are 28 inches long and 6 grains per inch, your total arrow weight, insert, nock, and broadhead included, would be in the neighborhood of 270-290 grains. I'd use 100 grain broadheads, just to keep it simple.
    I should add just as general info, even 6 grains per inch is on the low end. I personally use arrows that are 9 GPI, but I shoot 65 pounds, so for someone shooting less weight, they should use proportionately lighter arrows. That's why I recommended something in the neighborhood of 6 GPI. Good luck out there.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4everAutumn
    replied
    Huntfishtrap gave some great advice and I'll add my 2 cents: A lighter weight arrow will give you more speed and increase your range to make a hit, but a heavier arrow will give you better momentum for more penetration. Obviously, with heavier arrows, you will have to take closer shots, but you will get better results after you hit the deer. Heavier arrows are harder to stop than lighter ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeerHunter08
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    You generally want to stay above 5 grains per inch, and 6 is better. To figure the total arrow weight, just multiply the length of the arrows by the grains per inch. You can find what GPI your arrows are by either looking on the box, or on the manufacturer's website. For example, if your arrows are 28 inches long and 6 grains per inch, your total arrow weight, insert, nock, and broadhead included, would be in the neighborhood of 270-290 grains. I'd use 100 grain broadheads, just to keep it simple.
    Thank you for the advice huntfishtrap.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    You generally want to stay above 5 grains per inch, and 6 is better. To figure the total arrow weight, just multiply the length of the arrows by the grains per inch. You can find what GPI your arrows are by either looking on the box, or on the manufacturer's website. For example, if your arrows are 28 inches long and 6 grains per inch, your total arrow weight, insert, nock, and broadhead included, would be in the neighborhood of 270-290 grains. I'd use 100 grain broadheads, just to keep it simple.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Keep it on the light side and place your shot well.

    Leave a comment:


  • What arrow grain should I get my Beman ICS Hunter arrows for a 45# and 26" draw length Barnet Vortex for deer? What grain for my broadheads?

    What arrow grain should I get my Beman ICS Hunter arrows for a 45# and 26" draw length Barnet Vortex for deer? What grain for my broadheads?

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