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If the financial and logistical hurdles were not a problem, would you go on an African safari?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
    Keep in mind, Africa is a huge continent with different places to hunt, and ways to hunt. Just like here in the States. For example, I will not hunt behind high fences, or from a permanent blind overlooking a water hole or a feed trough, just like here in the U.S. That is what suits me, may be right or wrong. Interestingly, I cannot think of anyone who did not feel their African Safari was a hunt of a lifetime whether on a South African ranch or in an Equatorial forest. Logistics takes patience, as do crowded airports and government regulations. No one seems to regret the experience
    jcarlin, travel today is not a leisurely thing, I do not think even on a cruise ship. I have gotten to the point I feel traveling with firearms, properly documented, is just about as easy as traveling without them, it sometimes just takes longer to jump through the hoops. TSA, customs, and airlines are so focused on the legal regulations regarding the search for illegal weapons you may as well check your hunting firearms, properly of course.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
      Keep in mind, Africa is a huge continent with different places to hunt, and ways to hunt. Just like here in the States. For example, I will not hunt behind high fences, or from a permanent blind overlooking a water hole or a feed trough, just like here in the U.S. That is what suits me, may be right or wrong. Interestingly, I cannot think of anyone who did not feel their African Safari was a hunt of a lifetime whether on a South African ranch or in an Equatorial forest. Logistics takes patience, as do crowded airports and government regulations. No one seems to regret the experience
      I hear you. It's not just the travelling with hunting arms. I tend to have a fair amount of gear on my person at any time. Flying, most of it cannot be on my person, and then most out of country destinations would also prevent me from carrying as is my habit. It gets to me. It' like cancelling your life insurance before you go on an expedition. It doesn't seem to make sense.

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      • #18
        Thanks for all the interesting responses so far. For me personally, I have little interest in ever hunting in Africa. I would love to visit the continent and see the sights, but hunting...no. I'm not sure I can articulate why I feel that way, but it's due to a combination of reasons.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
          Thanks for all the interesting responses so far. For me personally, I have little interest in ever hunting in Africa. I would love to visit the continent and see the sights, but hunting...no. I'm not sure I can articulate why I feel that way, but it's due to a combination of reasons.
          One of the things that bothers me about it is that one of the primary purposes of hunting to me was always to bring home the meat. I know little goes to waste typically on a safari.. but it's not going to my freezer.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
            Thanks for all the interesting responses so far. For me personally, I have little interest in ever hunting in Africa. I would love to visit the continent and see the sights, but hunting...no. I'm not sure I can articulate why I feel that way, but it's due to a combination of reasons.
            I understand your feelings. It goes against our customs, but I assure you, your African meat, in most cases, will help a whole lot more folks who are needier, hungrier, and protein starved than here at home.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 6phunter View Post
              Hell yea,Cecil 2 would be in trouble
              Yep. You strike me as the kinda guy who would enjoy shooting a park lion over bait. Very exciting.

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              • #22
                Hi...!!


                Yes, but NOT to hunt...!!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JM View Post
                  I don't think I would want to hunt in Africa, but I'd love to go on a safari to look at everything Africa has to offer. That's why you going on the elk hunt with your brothers without you actually hunting sounds so appealing to me...just going to look and capture memories without actually holding a weapon sounds like a lot of fun to me.
                  You should check out the YouTube video of the Cheetah that jumps in a jeep with photographers in it and looks/sniffs around.

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                  • #24
                    I would go on a photographic safari only.

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                    • #25
                      An African hunting safari was certainly worth it for me. As mentioned by others, you must be prepared to spend a bundle. Relative to paying for a guided hunt in North America for a single big game animal the African alternative is better value. Of course, we have the luxury of hunting public lands in Canada and the US which eliminates the big dollar price tag. However, in my hunting area (Alberta) that opportunity is rapidly getting challenging. Many of the big game tags now can only be acquired by draw and that can have you waiting for years. Personally, I would have hesitated in choosing to go on a safari if I had not experienced fairly extensive hunting experiences on this continent. For me taking that trip later in life was a chance to enjoy new adventures. My wife and I enjoyed so much more than the hunting. The people, the landscapes, the climate, the birds, the vegetation, even the insects were of interest because it was all so new. As a particular bonus and of great value, you have your rifle on so many game animals prior to actually choosing to pull the trigger you can't help but benefit. Holding the crosshair on those animals and visualizing the shot placement while considering their anatomy will prepare you ever so well for the taking of the animal that might otherwise rattle your composure. Anybody that dreams of such a hunt is a fool not to prepare thoroughly in advance. While you might imagine simple shots with the animals broadside in open areas at mimimal ranges such is often not the case. Practice, practice and practice some more so that you are absolutely confident in your firearm and yours skills. Use premium ammo such as Swift A Frames or copper rounds that take the performance a step beyond the Nosler A Frame. The animals are crazy tough and the shots frequently long and/or require that rifle to hit your shoulder and fire quickly. Perhaps this is not the case on immature animals but a big mature kudu slips in an out of that bush and does not stick around once he has you. I did practice prior to going and my rifle just deadly so it went well. Nevertheless, I tell you in all honesty if I had known how difficult some of those shots were going to be I would have been nervous.
                      As for travelling with firearms I disagree with the previous comments. Flying through London and other European centers with firearms IS a hazel., No problem if they are being forwarded throught to the next connection but have a problem or wish to stay over for some extra tourist time and those firearms might as well be an anchor tied to your ankles as you go overboard. They also give unscuplous local officials in various African nations the opportunity to mess with you as they check your firearms. No, you are not in Alberta or Texas when it comes to checking in your hunting rifles in those exotic places. The guns can be a pain in the you know what!!!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Kody View Post
                        An African hunting safari was certainly worth it for me. As mentioned by others, you must be prepared to spend a bundle. Relative to paying for a guided hunt in North America for a single big game animal the African alternative is better value. Of course, we have the luxury of hunting public lands in Canada and the US which eliminates the big dollar price tag. However, in my hunting area (Alberta) that opportunity is rapidly getting challenging. Many of the big game tags now can only be acquired by draw and that can have you waiting for years. Personally, I would have hesitated in choosing to go on a safari if I had not experienced fairly extensive hunting experiences on this continent. For me taking that trip later in life was a chance to enjoy new adventures. My wife and I enjoyed so much more than the hunting. The people, the landscapes, the climate, the birds, the vegetation, even the insects were of interest because it was all so new. As a particular bonus and of great value, you have your rifle on so many game animals prior to actually choosing to pull the trigger you can't help but benefit. Holding the crosshair on those animals and visualizing the shot placement while considering their anatomy will prepare you ever so well for the taking of the animal that might otherwise rattle your composure. Anybody that dreams of such a hunt is a fool not to prepare thoroughly in advance. While you might imagine simple shots with the animals broadside in open areas at mimimal ranges such is often not the case. Practice, practice and practice some more so that you are absolutely confident in your firearm and yours skills. Use premium ammo such as Swift A Frames or copper rounds that take the performance a step beyond the Nosler A Frame. The animals are crazy tough and the shots frequently long and/or require that rifle to hit your shoulder and fire quickly. Perhaps this is not the case on immature animals but a big mature kudu slips in an out of that bush and does not stick around once he has you. I did practice prior to going and my rifle just deadly so it went well. Nevertheless, I tell you in all honesty if I had known how difficult some of those shots were going to be I would have been nervous.
                        As for travelling with firearms I disagree with the previous comments. Flying through London and other European centers with firearms IS a hazel., No problem if they are being forwarded throught to the next connection but have a problem or wish to stay over for some extra tourist time and those firearms might as well be an anchor tied to your ankles as you go overboard. They also give unscuplous local officials in various African nations the opportunity to mess with you as they check your firearms. No, you are not in Alberta or Texas when it comes to checking in your hunting rifles in those exotic places. The guns can be a pain in the you know what!!!
                        I forgot to mention a great reason for choosing to hunt Africa. If Cape Buffalo is on your list you get to buy that bigger caliber rifle that you had no reason to own in this country. My, my those big bores are something to witness upon impact and that big piece of lead can be astonishly accurate at the range as well. Wow!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Okwaho View Post
                          I don't think so. I have very little interest in any of the animals there, and even less interest in heat, thorns, bugs, snakes, etc. Also, hunting for me has a lot to do with connection to the land I'm hunting, and obviously I have nothing of the kind with anyplace in Africa. There are places I want to see, and perhaps animals I'd like to hunt (and fish I'd like to fish for) in several parts of western and northwestern North America, but there's nothing overseas that really draws me. If I had the means and it had to be outside North America, it would be something in one of the northern countries, maybe salmon-fishing in Scotland or visiting Sweden or Norway. Lots of good wild country there, or so I've read.
                          I've often thought pretty much along the same lines about Africa.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by pineywoods View Post
                            In a heartbeat. I'd love to kill a kudu, an eland, a cape buffalo, a bush hog, a warthog, an ornyx,a leopard and any number of lesser plains game. Hey, this is a wish and a dream, right?

                            Wouldn't want to shoot an elephant or rhino---maybe a hippo.

                            Whoa---I need a bunch of new guns! Better start checking catalogs.
                            New guns are a good thing, right? Would be an excuse to finally get a .375 H&H.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by JM View Post
                              I don't think I would want to hunt in Africa, but I'd love to go on a safari to look at everything Africa has to offer. That's why you going on the elk hunt with your brothers without you actually hunting sounds so appealing to me...just going to look and capture memories without actually holding a weapon sounds like a lot of fun to me.
                              Jimbo, can you post a link to that video?

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                                In addition to the previous answer, I don't think I've really scratched the surface of what North America has to offer yet.
                                JCarlin, I bet there's very few of us who ever really get to experience all the hunting North America has to offer.

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