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Aram recently did a feature on How to Get on a Horse which was good. How about some stories about Falling off horses? I'll bet Aram and members of the forum have some tales to tell. I will post this in the Forum section as well.

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  • Aram recently did a feature on How to Get on a Horse which was good. How about some stories about Falling off horses? I'll bet Aram and members of the forum have some tales to tell. I will post this in the Forum section as well.

    Aram recently did a feature on How to Get on a Horse which was good. How about some stories about Falling off horses? I'll bet Aram and members of the forum have some tales to tell. I will post this in the Forum section as well.

  • #2
    I have had more misadventures with horses falling, than I have with falling off horses. Been bucked off a few horses too.

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    • #3
      Once, while Bighorn sheep hunting, it was necessary to traverse an old, left over, snow pack, located on a steep slope. I got off to lead my horse and automatically took my rifle from the saddle scabbard. While crossing, the horses feet slipped out from under it. The poor horse tobogganed down the slope but was unhurt. The moral of the story is when you dismount always take your rifle with you.

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      • #4
        As a teenager I needed to load a buck on a packhorse, I was by myself. There was a large boulder at the head of a shale slide which I decided to use as a platform to load the deer. As I slide the carcass off the rock and on to the pack animal, the horse farted, jumped from under its load, lost its footing, and careened downhill in a cloud of dust and loose rock. The horse was dazed a little skinned up but otherwise fine. The pack saddle was ruined. The lesson learned was think ahead, and make sure the pack animal has room to maneuver safely.

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        • #5
          I've never fallen off a horse in my life - ever. Bet none of you can say that! Of course, I've never ridden a horse either... Lol

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          • #6
            Ouch, one last story. Hunting in the high lonesome, the snow was particularity treacherous. It was slippery and balled up wedging into the horses shoes, requiring frequent cleaning with a hoof pick. I waited too long for this chore and the horses feet flew out from under it. I crashed to the ground hitting a snow covered rock with my chest. When we came out of the mountains ten days later the doctor informed me I had a couple of broken ribs.. If you want to keep hunting make sure you have tape and pain killers.

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            • #7
              We were just riding along one time and another horse stopped dead without any warning and the rider did a somersault right over the horses neck. Wish I had a camera.
              Another time the controls of the horse went dead and the horse took me right into the barn, stepped through several storm windows stacked on the ground and stopped right at the feed bin. No power steering or power brakes worked on that caper - the horse knew exactly where he wanted to go.
              We had to be careful around Newada as we thought for sure he tried to step on your feet on purpose. At least he did not bite.

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              • #8
                I have been travelling so just got a chance to read these responses. Those steep grades and mountain paths sure carry no shortage of hazards on horseback. This eager amateur had best keep practicing. I am getting the hang of it and some measure of confidence but my inexperience overshadows any and all other risks. That just adds to the thrill and I am loving the experience. I hope I have nothing to contribute on falling off my horse in the future. Tobagganing down a steep slope on horseback is too extreme a sport for me. I'll take sure footed over fleet footing any day.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
                  Ouch, one last story. Hunting in the high lonesome, the snow was particularity treacherous. It was slippery and balled up wedging into the horses shoes, requiring frequent cleaning with a hoof pick. I waited too long for this chore and the horses feet flew out from under it. I crashed to the ground hitting a snow covered rock with my chest. When we came out of the mountains ten days later the doctor informed me I had a couple of broken ribs.. If you want to keep hunting make sure you have tape and pain killers.
                  Ouch! That must have made for some sleepless nights. You keep telling these stories and It may worry me into wearing a flak jacket

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                  • #10
                    God Bless the poor packhorse that slide down the shale slide. After that unfortunate experience I had coax and cajole him before he would take a single step after loading him he would stand rooted to the spot after being loaded, until I begged him to move out.

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                    • #11
                      Adam mentioned this, but it is important, do not get on a horse that is tied up

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                      • #12
                        When I was a kid we had horses I fell off more than I stayed on one time I was running the horse through the field the saddle came loose and me and the saddle fell off. I laugh today about it but then was not funny to me everybody else thought so.

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