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Do all encounters with a Alaskan brown bear that knows you are there result in a charge?

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  • Do all encounters with a Alaskan brown bear that knows you are there result in a charge?

    Do all encounters with a Alaskan brown bear that knows you are there result in a charge?

  • #2
    Of course not. I have no first-hand experience with brown bears, but I do know that absolutes (always, never, all, none, etc.) are very, very rare in nature.

    Comment


    • #3
      What per cent of the time would an encounter with a brown bear result in a charge vs. the bear walking away.

      Added:

      How would this same question relate to moose?

      Comment


      • #4
        I poked around the Alaska Fish & Game and DNR websites but couldn't find specific statistics relating encounters to attacks. For what it's worth, both websites indicated that attacks are "rare". Here's an interesting quote from the DNR website "You are allowed to carry a gun for protection in state parks. Remember, though, that more people are hurt by the guns they carry than are hurt by bears"

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        • #5
          Hi...


          No, they don't always result in a charge...they are just as apt to run away as not...!!


          Some bears will effect a 'fake' charge, and if so that is the time to slowly move away...!!


          They may often pay no attention to human sounds...but if you break a twig nearby...they will go to instant alert...!!


          Whether or not you will be carrying a gun...make sure you carry EPA Registered bear spray...which is VERY effective when used correctly..!!

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          • #6
            Hi...!!


            I don't think there's any statistics on the per cent of the instanced that a brown bear will charge...but probably fewer times than not...!!


            For additional information from Alaska's foremost bear biologist...Mr. Tom Smith...just google him and you'll find a wealth of valuable bear information there...!!

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            • #7
              An Alaskan brown bear is differentiated from a grizzly bear by geography. When I lived in Alaska in the 60's a brown bear became a grizzly bear when it walked something like 50 miles from the coast. I assume that has not changed and you are not talking about Kodiak bear with which I have no experience. If you fish for salmon in the rivers of Alaska you will have close encounters with brown bears and grizzly bears. No surprize that the bears go where the salmon go and they have spots that they have been frequenting a very long time. Yes, we often had rifles with us but at no time did we need to shoulder a firearm by being threatened. We were purposely noisy as we walked into our fishing locations to avoid startling a bear. They were fascinating fishing companions and greatly added to the experience. Sometimes I had the impression the bear watching us from across a river or from a nearby slope was waiting for us to catch something, then coming over for visit. It never happened but if it had we would have relinquished the fish in a big hurry to our dinner guest. I have had bears walk by my sleeping bag laid out right by my fishing hole without so much as a grunt. I am talking less than 10 feet away. They are just tending to the business of getting a full stomach. Make no mistake, it is easier to enjoy their company with a rifle close at hand. Anyway, fishermen are running into these bears daily and in many locations so if the bears were inclined to charge it would be a frequent byline in the news.

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              • #8
                No. I've been in serious bear country numerous times hunting and fishing. Every time I've had close encounters with bears. Some of them were curious and just circled around, while others bluffed, huffing and puffing bouncing their front legs. None resulted in a charge and there is no place to report any of this activity-- until the charge is completed.
                Like kody says there is comfort in a nearby rifle, very nearby. It's immaterial whether this is a false sense of security or not; the firearm kept me calm so that I didn't do anything stupid. Like RUN. I believe during a close encounter it's critical to hold your ground. Besides there are no trees to climb anyway.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                  Of course not. I have no first-hand experience with brown bears, but I do know that absolutes (always, never, all, none, etc.) are very, very rare in nature.
                  From my experience an actual full charge is pretty rare..even bluff charges. I'd say that it's less than 5 or 10 percent of the time will they actually charge

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                    What per cent of the time would an encounter with a brown bear result in a charge vs. the bear walking away.

                    Added:

                    How would this same question relate to moose?
                    From my experience an actual full charge is pretty rare..even bluff charges. I'd say that it's less than 5 or 10 percent of the time will they actually charge

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                      What per cent of the time would an encounter with a brown bear result in a charge vs. the bear walking away.

                      Added:

                      How would this same question relate to moose?
                      Hi...


                      I agree 100% with Mr. Freel's statement...!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                        Of course not. I have no first-hand experience with brown bears, but I do know that absolutes (always, never, all, none, etc.) are very, very rare in nature.
                        If you happen to be involved on the 5-10% group, the other 90-95% figure doesn't mean a thing !!!

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                        • #13
                          No. The few that do happen can sure sell a lot of magazines

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