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Is this unfriendly or what? Headline "Montana game warden’s citation in front of videographer angers Two Harbors elk hunter". The two brothers talked about how they should go about field-dressing the elk, whose back legs were submerged in a marsh. A

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  • Is this unfriendly or what? Headline "Montana game warden’s citation in front of videographer angers Two Harbors elk hunter". The two brothers talked about how they should go about field-dressing the elk, whose back legs were submerged in a marsh. A

    Is this unfriendly or what? Headline "Montana game warden’s citation in front of videographer angers Two Harbors elk hunter". The two brothers talked about how they should go about field-dressing the elk, whose back legs were submerged in a marsh. After about 20 minutes, during which he said a prayer and took photos of the elk, Latvala tagged the elk. euphoria quickly faded as a game warden with Montana FWP approached. Warden Drew Scott, had been watching the Latvalas’ hunt unfold through binoculars from his truck, while being videotaped by a cameraman with the TV show “Wardens.” http://staging.duluthnewstribune.com/news/montana-game-wardens-citation-front-videographer-angers-two-harbors-elk-hunter-3631201

  • #2
    The warden was correct that a law was broken. They are given plenty of latitude to do what is right though, even if it might not follow the absolute letter of the law. To me, a citation is given to provide incentive to change future behavior and recoup losses from choices made in the field. This was certainly not the crime of the century and there were no losses from these hunters. Behavior could have been changed with a simple talk with them about the offense. An officer can do their job and still create no ill will. They have a hard enough job without their own actions making it worse. Do I think the presence of the cameras had an influence on this officer's behavior? I absolutely believe it did.

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    • #3
      20 minutes is probably a bit of a delay and the warden was certainly within the law to cite this hunter. However, if they tagged the elk as part of the process then I really wondered if the warden's common sense came into play. JMHO

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      • #4
        Pardon my french, but that citation is bullshit. In states where you must tag an animal within a certain amount of time after recovery (where I live it's 15 minutes) I doubt there's a single hunter who has not broken the letter of that law at some point. As far as I'm concerned, those laws are garbage, and should be done away with. Logically speaking, if you do tag the animal, does it really matter how quickly you do so? I can understand why you should have to tag it before removing the carcass or meat from the field, but not being able to even field-dress it or take photos first is idiotic. And yes, I do believe having the camera looking over his shoulder probably did make the officer more likely to enforce the letter of the law, rather than the spirit of the law. Just one more reason not to watch "reality" TV.
        And what's up with his being able to keep the rack, but not the meat? That part really doesn't make sense. You would've thought they'd either let him keep both, or neither.

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        • #5
          that's justice all right just us '' sorry but I'd be one po sob this azz hole warden needs a little karma his self .and they wonder why? a guy I know was given a ticket for not wearing hunter orange hat from house to the barn. I had my own run in years ago when a new hunter was told by wardens he couldn't retrieve a deer from ft. knox installation w/ out permission from hunt control even though the deer was within sight . after getting permission to enter the deer was gone , only his testacles remained hanging from a tree. we later found this deer at a processor's with a road kill tag on and the two wardens names,yes it had a bullet hole the hunter identified the buck .I was told they got in trouble but I never seen any proof of this. MOST I've met were fair minded , but I only remember the a-- holes.

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          • #6
            I'm not going to subscribe to that site to read the entire story. What I'm gathering is, and correct me, that these guys did the field dressing, then tagged the elk before going anywhere and before the warden presented himself?

            That is a BS citation, I'd be pissed. It fits the letter of the law, but the spirit of the law is so that you can't try to get it to the truck without using your tag and have the "I forgot" excuse.

            If you tagged it of your own accord, but were under surveillance and didn't know it, obviously you had no ill intent. And to lose the meat? Give me a fine if you must, but to take the meat over that "offense"? That's just theft, even if it did go to kitchen. It's a significant theft, too.

            I'm with the crowd on this one. LEOs do themselves no favors by taking that kind of action. Who's going to ever voluntarily interact with that guy?

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            • #7
              Jcarlin, I read it before you were required to subscribe/log in B.S. They tagged it before field dressing and moving it an inch. 20 minutes had passed after the shot. In those 20 minutes they reached the animal, said a prayer, congratulated each other and took photos, then they tagged it. The law in Montana apparently says you must tag it "immediately". I guess that means right away upon approaching it. They say this is so hunters don't think about it too long than decide to leave it and try and shoot a bigger one. The warden appeared after it was tagged even. He got the head back after they ruled it was a ridiculous seizure but I think the meat was already donated and eaten. In MN you just have to tag an animal before being moved by motor vehicle or away from property. It can be dragged out of the woods first. This warden just made a lot of future T.I.P. volunteers think twice about helping them out I would imagine.

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              • #8
                I got a warning one time when I tagged a whitetail and then dragged it to my truck. The warden was pissed because the tag had some mud on it. I said I followed the regulations and tagged it immediately. He said 'have a good day' and left.

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                • #9
                  Try this one or google it, lot's written about this incident.

                  http://www.gohunt.com/read/elk-citation-angers-hunters

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                    I'm not going to subscribe to that site to read the entire story. What I'm gathering is, and correct me, that these guys did the field dressing, then tagged the elk before going anywhere and before the warden presented himself?

                    That is a BS citation, I'd be pissed. It fits the letter of the law, but the spirit of the law is so that you can't try to get it to the truck without using your tag and have the "I forgot" excuse.

                    If you tagged it of your own accord, but were under surveillance and didn't know it, obviously you had no ill intent. And to lose the meat? Give me a fine if you must, but to take the meat over that "offense"? That's just theft, even if it did go to kitchen. It's a significant theft, too.

                    I'm with the crowd on this one. LEOs do themselves no favors by taking that kind of action. Who's going to ever voluntarily interact with that guy?
                    They tagged it before field dressing.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One of my goals has been to hunt something in every state before I die. In the process of hunting multiple states I have learned there are friendly states and those that are those who are out to get you. Montana has a reputation as the latter. 50% of the fines levied in MT go into the warden's state retirement fund. So the more citations they write the bigger the retirement pot of all. Another upcoming case is a MN hunter who drove in on a private road to ask permission to hunt, no one was home so he drove out and did not hunt. 6 days after returning home he got a call from a warden who told him he was mailing a criminal trespass citation!? Apparently MT wardens assume NR hunters will not come back to fight these things. What kind of a landowner would press a charge like this? Unless I'm hunting with my buddy dropjhook on his reservation I will not hunt or fish in MT until they do some law and procedure changes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
                        One of my goals has been to hunt something in every state before I die. In the process of hunting multiple states I have learned there are friendly states and those that are those who are out to get you. Montana has a reputation as the latter. 50% of the fines levied in MT go into the warden's state retirement fund. So the more citations they write the bigger the retirement pot of all. Another upcoming case is a MN hunter who drove in on a private road to ask permission to hunt, no one was home so he drove out and did not hunt. 6 days after returning home he got a call from a warden who told him he was mailing a criminal trespass citation!? Apparently MT wardens assume NR hunters will not come back to fight these things. What kind of a landowner would press a charge like this? Unless I'm hunting with my buddy dropjhook on his reservation I will not hunt or fish in MT until they do some law and procedure changes.
                        I'm sure some residents would be happy to have out-of-staters gone but people that earn a living off them would strongly disagree. I was hoping to visit an uncle in Montana to do some hunting in the near future. Think I'll drive a little further and spend my money and hunt with my cousin in Idaho instead.

                        I do wish DJH was around more. That guy is hilarious.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MN Outdoorsman View Post
                          Jcarlin, I read it before you were required to subscribe/log in B.S. They tagged it before field dressing and moving it an inch. 20 minutes had passed after the shot. In those 20 minutes they reached the animal, said a prayer, congratulated each other and took photos, then they tagged it. The law in Montana apparently says you must tag it "immediately". I guess that means right away upon approaching it. They say this is so hunters don't think about it too long than decide to leave it and try and shoot a bigger one. The warden appeared after it was tagged even. He got the head back after they ruled it was a ridiculous seizure but I think the meat was already donated and eaten. In MN you just have to tag an animal before being moved by motor vehicle or away from property. It can be dragged out of the woods first. This warden just made a lot of future T.I.P. volunteers think twice about helping them out I would imagine.
                          In my humble opinion the state owes him $800 for meat for the year, or at least the courtesy of delivering the next animal they confiscate to the butcher of his choice.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            After reading the longer version in the link provided by MWK_MN, I have even less liking for the way Montana FWP handled this situation. Everybody makes mistakes, but it's how you handle the situation after making a mistake that separates the good people from the not-so-good people. The citation was clearly a mistake, as evidenced by the county attorney dropping the charges upon hearing how ridiculous they were. But according to that piece, Montana FWP has continued to insist that it was a right and justified citation, which is absurd. The statement by the president and executive producer of “Wardens” was also insulting. No pressure to produce anything?!? Please. If they didn't produce anything, there would be no show, so that's bull, plain and simple.
                            Any desire I had to hunt in Montana has disappeared after hearing about this situation.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                              After reading the longer version in the link provided by MWK_MN, I have even less liking for the way Montana FWP handled this situation. Everybody makes mistakes, but it's how you handle the situation after making a mistake that separates the good people from the not-so-good people. The citation was clearly a mistake, as evidenced by the county attorney dropping the charges upon hearing how ridiculous they were. But according to that piece, Montana FWP has continued to insist that it was a right and justified citation, which is absurd. The statement by the president and executive producer of “Wardens” was also insulting. No pressure to produce anything?!? Please. If they didn't produce anything, there would be no show, so that's bull, plain and simple.
                              Any desire I had to hunt in Montana has disappeared after hearing about this situation.
                              I like all of you obviuosly think the hunter should only have been given a lesson on the law and why it exists and a "warning". If the warden was feeling di*%head enough he could give him a fine/citation to drive his ego up, reality t.v. rockstar status up or whatever but to go as far as confiscating the animal after what went down my goodness that is just ridiculous. That is an almost thousand dollar tag and another thousand dollars in trip expenses for a once in a lifetime trip to spend with your long distance brother. On top of that the meat will last 2 years. I feel for this guy.

                              Comment

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