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I made the mistake of leaving my buck barrel in a container with my scent a way shampoo for the off season. Found it rusted like

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  • I made the mistake of leaving my buck barrel in a container with my scent a way shampoo for the off season. Found it rusted like

    I made the mistake of leaving my buck barrel in a container with my scent a way shampoo for the off season. Found it rusted like crazy because the shampoo spilled and it sat in it for almost a year. Whats the best method for removing the rust? I have heard of oil and steel wool but I don't know what grade steel wool or kind of oil/solvent to use. Thanks.

  • #2
    #0000 Steel wool, WD-40, and LIGHT pressure will clean it up if it isn't too deep. Then oil it and keep it clean.

    Here's a link to a bunch of other similar answers, and some good info depending on the barrel finish too.

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20061116195441AA47fNd

    the_golf_guy

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    • #3
      Thanks golf guy.

      It's really pretty amazing the inside of the barrel didn't get damaged. When I took it out of the box I thought the whole thing would be ruined cause it was seriously half covered in a green mossy looking rust (probably something to do with the chemicals in the shampoo I'm guessing).

      Man was I kicking myself for doing that. But to my surprise the inside of the barrel is still good. I'll have to do some explaining when I'm in the woods though to other hunters. lol There definitely won't be any mistaking my 870 for someone else's.

      Comment


      • #4
        The barrel may be chrome lined, that would explain why there isn't any rust in the barrel. If the rust is severe, you may want to cruise on over to surplusrifleforum.com and search the electrolysis tank. An hour or two in a tank, and you can just wipe the rust off with a rag. Quite amazing actually.

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        • #5
          You may want to think twice about shooting that barrel if you've got any deeper pits after cleaning it up. Light surface rust is one thing - deep pits another entirely. If you have the latter, you've significantly reduced the thickness of the barrel by removing metal and greatly increased the weakness in those areas. Remove enough of it, and you're asking for a potential armful of shrapnel when it blows up, given the higher interior pressures slugs generate.

          Replacement barrels are cheap compared to a trip to the emergency room.

          Comment


          • #6
            Madmax,

            Thanks for the advice. The barrel doesn't appear to have any deep pits of rust but since I am no expert and value my life I am definitely going to have a gunsmith or two take a look at it.

            Comment


            • #7
              sucngas,

              Thanks for the link and info. I had never heard of doing that. I'll give it a look.

              Comment

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