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Is it safe to use WD-40 for oiling up guns?

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  • Is it safe to use WD-40 for oiling up guns?

    Is it safe to use WD-40 for oiling up guns?

  • #2
    I wouldn't use it for that, it has a tendency to smell, and it doesn't exactly dry very quickly. I'll stick with hoppes and rem oil

    Comment


    • #3
      As a gunsmith that had that very question posed to me and answered by the same well experienced gunsmith, NO. WD-40 is flamable and your gun is a tool that uses a primer to ignite the powder. Stop and think about this scenario, you have a soon to be fire and a flamable right next to your face as you squeeze the trigger. It is always beter to be safe than to have a regret for not thinking it through.

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      • #4
        Like Yoda and WYOHUNTER said, it does tend to smell and is very dangerous to use on your gun. The best thing to use is gun oil and rifle lube to keep your firearm working.

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        • #5
          IF (and that's a big if) that's all you have available, and IF it's going to rain or has been raining, then it might get you by. But, the biggest problem (aside from those mentioned above) is that WD-40 leaves behind a waxy residue after most of it evaporates which gums up small metallic parts quite nicely while also remaining just sticky enough to aid in the collection of dust and grit in and on those parts. Those are also the very same parts you really don't want to have waxy/gummy/dusty/gritty when it comes time for them to move in concert as Ol Betsy tries to punch a primer.

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          • #6
            I agree WD 40 is a BAD idea, also do not spray REM-Oil
            near the action of your Semi or pump actionit will gum them up, instead spray it on a soft rag to wipe down the OUTSIDE Parts. There is a new Product called
            Strike-Hold that does a very good job of CLEANING and a light Lubrication. A cautionary note: It contains Trychlorethelene which is very toxic and you do NOT want to inhale or use in a closed room. I take it outside. Use a white gun lube on moving parts.

            Comment


            • #7
              WD-40 is actually stands for Water Displacement (Formula #) 40! It was accidently discovered and first primarily used on the Atlas missile program at Vandenberg AFB California. The missile gantries were located right on the Pacific coast close enough you can throw a rock in the ocean. The salty moist air was hell on electronic.

              As for a lubricant it’s a fantastic anti rust preventative, but I use regular gun oil for moving parts and for extreme cold arctic weather I used both WD40 and automatic transmission fluid as lubricants using no oil. NO JOKE!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by WYOHUNTER View Post
                As a gunsmith that had that very question posed to me and answered by the same well experienced gunsmith, NO. WD-40 is flamable and your gun is a tool that uses a primer to ignite the powder. Stop and think about this scenario, you have a soon to be fire and a flamable right next to your face as you squeeze the trigger. It is always beter to be safe than to have a regret for not thinking it through.
                If you are worried about flammability, you might want to let Remington know...so is their Rem Oil aerosol spray !!! http://www.remington.com/~/media/Images/Accessories/Gun-Care/RemOil4oz-prod.ashx?w=570&bc=ffffff

                Not to worry tho, the volatile stuff evaps. quickly.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I used WD40 for years in semi auto and pump shotguns (rem 1100 and 870) and found it perfectly fine for cleaning and protecting. Shooting skeet and trap, sometimes up to 200 rounds per day was never a problem with the 12 and 20, but the 28 and 410 used dirtier powders that tended to get gummy after 50 rounds or so. Hosing down the chamber and slides removed this crud. After shooting, take down the guns, spray the trigger assembly and receiver with WD and wash under hot tap water (the hotter the better). Then shake off excess water and spray down with WD. My guns are over 40 years old, show no rust or problems with the wood as a result. WD has been my choice for cleaning a lube for all my guns, and they are all in excellent shape. WD is great for getting gunk from the nooks and crannies as well as just leaving on the guns. I once dropped my 1100 in the mud while duck hunting and simply rinsed it in ice cold water to get the mud off and hosed it down with WD and never had a problem. Good stuff and comes in small packable cans. I've also heard but can't verify that the stuff makes a great bait enhancer for fishing. The use for cleaning and preserving a gun speaks for itself in my book.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have used wd40 on all my guns for over 40 years. I have used it on my Rimington 700 since the day I got in 1974. Rain shine sleet and snow and it still looks and works like new, other than a few dings and scratches from carrying it in the woods. Bolt action, auto, single shot. I use it on all and I'm still waiting on the gum, buildup and waxy film to show up. And I'm still waiting for one to burst into flames like one guy was saying. It,s all bs. And wd40 will get down into the tight places where oil can't get to. Wd40 will not collect dust like oil will. Clean your gun with whatever you want. Soap and water if you want. Oil all the moving parts you want. But when you finish wipe it down inside and out with wd40. Especially before putting it up for week or months. I do mine every cleaning and wipe them down at least two time a year reguardless if used or not. I have 6 long guns, three handguns revolver, auto, bolt action and single shot. All but one at least 35 years old. I have Never had to replace any part on or have one speck of rust on any of them. No bs Just fact.

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                    • #11
                      I have been shooting for over 40 years. Some of my firearms have been with me a long time and get regular use. I fell into a routine of cleaning chambers, barrels and actions with Hoppes #9 and finishing up with a coat of WD-40 and a THOROUGH wipe down with a cloth and for the past few years a final bore snaking. In all those years have never seen a speck of rust anywhere. Have no idea what is meant by a "buildup" of anything. All metal parts function fine. Internal and external parts show nothing but normal wear. I do an annual safe empty and inspection (3 safes) and see a lot of mirror bores looking back at me. Don't know what all the fuss it about. Personal choices like these are now considered at the same level of religion and politics. Everyone should get the info, do what they want and monitor the results, make changes if necessary, but above all ENJOY shooting!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        WD 40 takes the bluing out of a gun. Use it enough and you'll see.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A gunsmith warned me a long time ago to avoid the use of WD-40 on firearms because when it dries out, it turns into varnish.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
                            A gunsmith warned me a long time ago to avoid the use of WD-40 on firearms because when it dries out, it turns into varnish.
                            I had a can lose it's pressure so I drilled holes in it and got our the wd-40. Set it on the shelf and forgot about it. After about a month I looked at it and there was a off white sediment in the jar. My guess is debris from the fish oil added to the product. I would only use RemOil or something like Sheath. Never anything on the trigger or firing pin. Take a tooth brush and brush in stock checkering with RemOil. Moisture can enter through the exposed grain of checkering.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              WD-40 Has it's place but not around Firearms Or Ammo! 99Exp is Right.

                              Comment

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