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Here is a question I asked once to a great wingshooter,Dad ,how do you shoot birds flushed in,and flying through the woods?

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  • 6phunter
    replied
    Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
    In answer to your question 6p, I have found the use of a gun to be the most handy ! I tried hitting them with stones, but never had much luck. But, I must say that I killed more trees with the gun than I ever did with stones. In all honesty 6p, although my memory is not all that good anymore, I can not recall ever hitting a damn grouse. I was a good wing shot on pheasants, but grouse were a far different bird when I was still a gun hunter ! I never did get to where their flush didn’t startle me too much, and never did figure out how they always knew which darn tree to duck behind. If anyone ever hit more than half a dozen of those little buggers, they should be in the Grouse Hall of Fame !!
    Lol,I don,t know where the stones came from,Treestand probably used them to flush birds,I kept young dogs on a tether with birds that had been dizzied,so I knew where they sat,taught the pup to hold through the flush. I do miss working the young dogs.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    Originally posted by Outlaw View Post
    Never tried grouse much but we've got quite a few quail and woodcock here. I gotta say, I've had a few take off and come flying a couple feet from my face. Then I turn into a stumbling wreck and am lucky if I even got a shot off, let alone a good one. Luckily though, they often don't go far and I can watch where they land, so when the dog puts them up the 2nd time I'm more prepared lol (if I miss the 2nd time that one deserves to keep living) And whether it's upland birds or wood ducks in the timber I just time shots like I would in a more open area, occasionally I'll hit a tree but more often than not it'll make it. One of those subconscious things I guess.
    I spent many a hour slipping along the banks of Keechi Creek jump shooting woodies (we called them squealers!) in the bends and turns!

    Stumbled into a brand spanking new "Y" series Win M12.
    Bought it and a couple of boxes of high velocity 8's and headed out that afternoon.
    It was in the low 40's, cloudy and spitting rain.
    Easing up to my favorite bend first, I could hear them whistling.
    I assumed my best "station 3" pose and slowly eased forward.
    The BIGGEST trick was picking out the ducks to shoot so they fell either in the creek or on my side.
    Crossing the creek was tough and took up valuable hunting time! LOL!
    The splash of wings and rush of air thrilled me to no end and one little flashy drake came right at me!
    The M12 tracked him perfectly as he gained air and experience told me he would fall on my side of the creek.....problem was, he was right in my face.
    My mind kept telling me, "Don't shoot! Don't shoot!" ... but it didn't get to my trigger finger!
    I really felt bad. When I walked over to pick him up, all that was left was head, wings and feet!
    He was so close, the pattern hadn't opened up and had blown a hole you could have stuck a baseball through right through the breast!
    That gun was a beast!
    Oil worms ate it up!

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
    In answer to your question 6p, I have found the use of a gun to be the most handy ! I tried hitting them with stones, but never had much luck. But, I must say that I killed more trees with the gun than I ever did with stones. In all honesty 6p, although my memory is not all that good anymore, I can not recall ever hitting a damn grouse. I was a good wing shot on pheasants, but grouse were a far different bird when I was still a gun hunter ! I never did get to where their flush didn’t startle me too much, and never did figure out how they always knew which darn tree to duck behind. If anyone ever hit more than half a dozen of those little buggers, they should be in the Grouse Hall of Fame !!
    That 6p, I can agree with. If the flush can be better determined with the presence of a dog, I can see the fact of better “luck” in doing them in ! Good point.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6phunter
    replied
    I appreciate all the replies,Dewman answer was close to what my father said,shootem,in the woods the same as in an open field,you can,t swing ahead to an opening and resume your swing,and you sure can,t move the canopy. Yes,you will miss some due to blockage,but you will connect a lot more than if you panic and think to long.Years of dog training required I paid more attention to the dog than the expected flush of the bird. If you suffer from the rush of the flush,unload your gun next time,and dry fire a few. It doesn't, take many to realize that you have a lot more time to shoot than you realize.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6phunter
    replied
    Originally posted by dewman View Post
    I had great success both with and without a dog by just visualizing that there was no woods, that it was wide open. With a dog it seemed like I could look over her head when she was on point and somehow I knew where he was going to fly off. Doodles would often have this little hesitation when they topped out of canopy but grouse were off to the races.
    Pretty close to the advice the old man gave me ,get on the bird ,swing and shoot,the same in the woods just like in an open field

    Leave a comment:


  • 6phunter
    replied
    Originally posted by bowhunter75richard View Post
    In answer to your question 6p, I have found the use of a gun to be the most handy ! I tried hitting them with stones, but never had much luck. But, I must say that I killed more trees with the gun than I ever did with stones. In all honesty 6p, although my memory is not all that good anymore, I can not recall ever hitting a damn grouse. I was a good wing shot on pheasants, but grouse were a far different bird when I was still a gun hunter ! I never did get to where their flush didn’t startle me too much, and never did figure out how they always knew which darn tree to duck behind. If anyone ever hit more than half a dozen of those little buggers, they should be in the Grouse Hall of Fame !!
    They are tuff,but not impossible,a close working dog is a must

    Leave a comment:


  • 6phunter
    replied
    Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
    Good eyesight is, of course, a prerequisite. Shooting by instinct is important. Focus on the bird not aiming the gun or missing the stuff it's flying through. It's more difficult with pheasants in heavy cover because the sex must be identified. That requires looking through the brush and decision making which all takes time. For grouse this isn't necessary. Actually I miss more birds in the open because I tend to overthink the shot. Have learned to keep the gun down until the last moment. The tighter the window, the better I seem to shoot. This is especially important hunting over decoys where one often has sight of the bird long before it can be shot.

    The range is the best place to hone instinctive shooting skills. Shoot low gun trap. If the course will allow it, stand ten yards behind the house facing different directions while someone behind you at #3 pulls the oscillating targets indiscriminately. Set the machine to wobble if available.
    Honk is onto something,same game we made up to improve your skills,just say your ready,and the thrower determines when,and to try to keep you from busting the clay

    Leave a comment:


  • crm3006
    replied
    We used to call it brush bustin'. and my Father was absolutely deadly at it. I asked him his secret when I was fourteen or fifteen, and he said he just picked an opening, and when the bird flew through, he shot it. Working brushy draws for fast flying bobwhites that get up right under your feet, or hold until you are almost stepping on the dog, will definitely hone your snap shooting.

    Leave a comment:


  • crm3006
    replied
    Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
    Good eyesight is, of course, a prerequisite. Shooting by instinct is important. Focus on the bird not aiming the gun or missing the stuff it's flying through. It's more difficult with pheasants in heavy cover because the sex must be identified. That requires looking through the brush and decision making which all takes time. For grouse this isn't necessary. Actually I miss more birds in the open because I tend to overthink the shot. Have learned to keep the gun down until the last moment. The tighter the window, the better I seem to shoot. This is especially important hunting over decoys where one often has sight of the bird long before it can be shot.

    The range is the best place to hone instinctive shooting skills. Shoot low gun trap. If the course will allow it, stand ten yards behind the house facing different directions while someone behind you at #3 pulls the oscillating targets indiscriminately. Set the machine to wobble if available.
    Now, now, Tree. You know honk the phoney is the expert on everydamnthing!

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
    Good eyesight is, of course, a prerequisite. Shooting by instinct is important. Focus on the bird not aiming the gun or missing the stuff it's flying through. It's more difficult with pheasants in heavy cover because the sex must be identified. That requires looking through the brush and decision making which all takes time. For grouse this isn't necessary. Actually I miss more birds in the open because I tend to overthink the shot. Have learned to keep the gun down until the last moment. The tighter the window, the better I seem to shoot. This is especially important hunting over decoys where one often has sight of the bird long before it can be shot.

    The range is the best place to hone instinctive shooting skills. Shoot low gun trap. If the course will allow it, stand ten yards behind the house facing different directions while someone behind you at #3 pulls the oscillating targets indiscriminately. Set the machine to wobble if available.
    In heavy brush/grape vines Snap Shooting is the only way to go! You snus you lose!! You have no idea what direction they take.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ontario Honker Hunter
    replied
    Good eyesight is, of course, a prerequisite. Shooting by instinct is important. Focus on the bird not aiming the gun or missing the stuff it's flying through. It's more difficult with pheasants in heavy cover because the sex must be identified. That requires looking through the brush and decision making which all takes time. For grouse this isn't necessary. Actually I miss more birds in the open because I tend to overthink the shot. Have learned to keep the gun down until the last moment. The tighter the window, the better I seem to shoot. This is especially important hunting over decoys where one often has sight of the bird long before it can be shot.

    The range is the best place to hone instinctive shooting skills. Shoot low gun trap. If the course will allow it, stand ten yards behind the house facing different directions while someone behind you at #3 pulls the oscillating targets indiscriminately. Set the machine to wobble if available.

    Leave a comment:


  • Outlaw
    replied
    Never tried grouse much but we've got quite a few quail and woodcock here. I gotta say, I've had a few take off and come flying a couple feet from my face. Then I turn into a stumbling wreck and am lucky if I even got a shot off, let alone a good one. Luckily though, they often don't go far and I can watch where they land, so when the dog puts them up the 2nd time I'm more prepared lol (if I miss the 2nd time that one deserves to keep living) And whether it's upland birds or wood ducks in the timber I just time shots like I would in a more open area, occasionally I'll hit a tree but more often than not it'll make it. One of those subconscious things I guess.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    I was shown HOW TO Shoot Grouse by my Grandad & Uncle keep your eyes on the ground & gun at port~arms, have a right pocket full of 1/2 dollar size gravel It's worked for more then 50+ years for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    In answer to your question 6p, I have found the use of a gun to be the most handy ! I tried hitting them with stones, but never had much luck. But, I must say that I killed more trees with the gun than I ever did with stones. In all honesty 6p, although my memory is not all that good anymore, I can not recall ever hitting a damn grouse. I was a good wing shot on pheasants, but grouse were a far different bird when I was still a gun hunter ! I never did get to where their flush didn’t startle me too much, and never did figure out how they always knew which darn tree to duck behind. If anyone ever hit more than half a dozen of those little buggers, they should be in the Grouse Hall of Fame !!

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    when I first started hunting my buddy could see and hit a grouse when they first jumped up off the ground. He would shoot 3 and get 3. I could not see them until the flew and I would shoot at 3 and maybe get 1.

    Leave a comment:

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