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I just recieved a brand new, Ruger, Model 77, carbine, in 223 caliber. Some of my hunting lease friends ask me it I was going to

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  • I just recieved a brand new, Ruger, Model 77, carbine, in 223 caliber. Some of my hunting lease friends ask me it I was going to

    I just recieved a brand new, Ruger, Model 77, carbine, in 223 caliber. Some of my hunting lease friends ask me it I was going to break it in? In all of my 65 years of hunting, I am not sure what " Breaking it in" means. I have heard serveral things but only one makes sence. Fire a round, clean barrel, fire 2 rounds, clean barrel, fire 3 rounds and so on to about 20 rounds, before you zero it in. I was told to use full metal jacket, but I was planning to use Hornady Tap ammo, 60 grain. Does this make sence.

  • #2
    Not sure on a 223 but breaking a gun in is shooting enough rounds through the barrel as to clean all the burrs out of the rifleing. Big bore guns require approximately 3000 rounds to break it in. So not many people will fire that many in a life time so you can go to your local gun shop and ask if the offer barrel breaking in. And all they do is use a chemical that does the job for you. Not as fun but not as expensive as well. Hope this helps.

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    • #3
      The Barnes Reloading Manual offers suggestions for breaking in a barrel that made sense to me. They claim the break in will make later cleanings easier and help it remain accurate between cleanings. Furthermore, their experience show many so called clean barrels have significant amounts of copper fouling and thses efirearms suffered in the accuracy department. So using one of the copper solvent cleaners during break in and at regular intervals would be a plan. Their advice is based on a broad spectrum of rifles and many thousands of rounds.
      In terms of wearing out barrels, I suppose that is contingent on the cartridge and the chambers of various rifles. I recall Jack O'Connor mentioning he noticed his .270's losing accuracy in much less than 3000 rounds and one of his 7 X 57's with an especially long throat eroded even more quickly.

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      • #4
        They are talking about breaking in the barrel. Depending on who you talk to, it varies about how many rounds to shoot before cleaning the barrel and how many times to repeat the procedure before reaching the final amount of shots fired. Some people fire one, three or five rounds than clean the barrel and repeat this a few times or like the way you mentioned. The idea behind it is to remove any tooling marks left behind from the barrel reamer. Probably a better way to do this is to use Tubb's Final Finish abrasive-coated bullets, but you have to handload them for center-fire ammunition.

        There has never been a study done on the merits of breaking in a barrel versus not breaking one in. I quess it is just personal preference whether to break a barrel in or not. Or maybe it is just a myth about breaking a barrel in.



        If, you decide to break in your barrel; using the Hornady ammo should be fine to use. It seems a shooter would want to break in a barrel with the type of ammo they would shoot in it.

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        • #5
          Another option to consider is to email Ruger through their website and ask them what procedures they recommend for your specific rifle. For example, Browning provides very specific instructions for the "break in" process for their .308 A-Bolt, to include avoiding bonded rounds. This could provide you with model specific info.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jcpace0021 View Post
            Not sure on a 223 but breaking a gun in is shooting enough rounds through the barrel as to clean all the burrs out of the rifleing. Big bore guns require approximately 3000 rounds to break it in. So not many people will fire that many in a life time so you can go to your local gun shop and ask if the offer barrel breaking in. And all they do is use a chemical that does the job for you. Not as fun but not as expensive as well. Hope this helps.
            3000 rounds sounds very excessive (and unbelievable)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Kody View Post
              The Barnes Reloading Manual offers suggestions for breaking in a barrel that made sense to me. They claim the break in will make later cleanings easier and help it remain accurate between cleanings. Furthermore, their experience show many so called clean barrels have significant amounts of copper fouling and thses efirearms suffered in the accuracy department. So using one of the copper solvent cleaners during break in and at regular intervals would be a plan. Their advice is based on a broad spectrum of rifles and many thousands of rounds.
              In terms of wearing out barrels, I suppose that is contingent on the cartridge and the chambers of various rifles. I recall Jack O'Connor mentioning he noticed his .270's losing accuracy in much less than 3000 rounds and one of his 7 X 57's with an especially long throat eroded even more quickly.
              Thanks Kody. I'll check out Barnes recommendations.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Johnnie View Post
                They are talking about breaking in the barrel. Depending on who you talk to, it varies about how many rounds to shoot before cleaning the barrel and how many times to repeat the procedure before reaching the final amount of shots fired. Some people fire one, three or five rounds than clean the barrel and repeat this a few times or like the way you mentioned. The idea behind it is to remove any tooling marks left behind from the barrel reamer. Probably a better way to do this is to use Tubb's Final Finish abrasive-coated bullets, but you have to handload them for center-fire ammunition.

                There has never been a study done on the merits of breaking in a barrel versus not breaking one in. I quess it is just personal preference whether to break a barrel in or not. Or maybe it is just a myth about breaking a barrel in.



                If, you decide to break in your barrel; using the Hornady ammo should be fine to use. It seems a shooter would want to break in a barrel with the type of ammo they would shoot in it.
                I don't think it makes much difference in what ammo is used.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tduke View Post
                  Another option to consider is to email Ruger through their website and ask them what procedures they recommend for your specific rifle. For example, Browning provides very specific instructions for the "break in" process for their .308 A-Bolt, to include avoiding bonded rounds. This could provide you with model specific info.
                  If I'm recalling correctly, Ruger doesn't recommend a "break in".

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Treestand, I don't think barrel break-in is required in this age of tight manufacturing tolerances. Here's an interesting article on the subject...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
                      Treestand, I don't think barrel break-in is required in this age of tight manufacturing tolerances. Here's an interesting article on the subject...
                      By the way, I've never gone through a barrel break-in procedure.

                      Comment

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