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  • Iron sights, Yes, No, Maybe?

    I’ve been thinking on this one since reading Amflyer’s response to me on his Not Available Rifle thread. The subject of the iron sights came up, I had originally taken the rear off my .270 for scope mounting then the front just because. I kept them and would consider reinstalling the set if it didn’t affect the scope mounting. I don’t see the point of having just the front one on.

    I had to remove the rear sight on my old .243 as well but didn’t mess with the front due to the way it’s attached. Also pulled both sights off my 788 and the Kid’s had been removed when he got his. Off the top of my head the only guns I have with both scopes and irons are my Marlin 1895G and two muzzleloaders. I suppose you could count my 835 Mossberg with fiber optics and a red dot since it’s more or less used like a rifle. The rest are either / or.

    Personally I like the cleaner lines of not having irons on a scoped rifle. I get having the capability of pulling a scope and still being in business but in reality how often does that happen? And how many people actually practice with the irons on that scoped rifle to adequately use them at any distance?

    On the other hand I like some rifles without scopes. Mainly some .22’s and definitely Winchester 94’s. Irons have a place in some situations.

    From a practical standpoint the one thing about irons I don’t like is how front sights seem to catch branches and such walking through the thick stuff. Not just annoying but can cause a noise issue as well. Not to mention pulling hoods off to be lost forever.

    Anyway I haven’t dug the set out that goes on the 700, I might just check to see if the rear will clear the Leupold in the rings now on it. If so I’m considering reinstalling them just to get the gun back to a more original condition.


    Not looking for advice, just wondering what y’all’s take on them is? Still necessary or outdated?

  • #2
    It's good to have back-ups, especially on a hunt where having irons is the better back up plan to stopping. But really, scopes are pretty decent these days, if you stay with quality. And a torx wrench and a spare scope isn't that hard to pack.

    So, in all honesty, it's mostly an esthetic thing for me. Give me a svelte walnut stock with a Schnabel forend, open sights and a straight tubed scope, and I'm all about it.

    Rifle nuts are strange folk, sometimes.

    Comment


    • #3
      The design of the sights makes a difference in esthetics as well. I run a little cold on front hoods in general. Haven’t had a need for a stopping rifle to this point in life, but we’re getting more and more black bears around, lol.

      My Guide Gun has a hooded front that is very prominent in the scope at 1-2x. It’s kinda distracting, especially if you move your head the slightest bit. Parallax error makes it float around. Seems like in a stopping situation that could be a bad thing.

      As far as rifle folk being strange, you’ve spent time with horse and dog people right? Start adding them together and look out. Still not crazy cat lady level though.

      Comment


      • #4
        I had asked this same question on F&S site on 8-18-2020. Wonder if things might of changed for some by now? In my experience the biggest benefit to a front sight hood is to protect a soft case from getting disemboweled by the front sight in the event you don't unzip it far enough and yank the gun out. I've seen this for myself. If I have a gun with opens then they are sighted in, scope or not. If no sights (smooth barrel) I don't sweat it. If I travel to hunt I carry a spare gun ready to go. Things happen. Not often, but sometimes. Reflexes and red dots have replaced opens for me up close but I put no trust in a battery.

        Comment


        • #5
          Not looking for advice, just wondering what y’all’s take on them is? Still necessary or outdated?

          Okee-dokee!

          There are situations where iron sights and scopes both are preferred.

          IMHO, I think we should start kids with iron sights, teach them the basics, THEN proceed to scopes.

          Not long ago, my eldest was in search of a 1-ton pickup with a standard transmission.
          Not only was a 1-ton diesel the price of a small, blackland farm, dealerships just laughed when asked about a standard transmission.

          We're getting away from basics.

          Learn the basics.
          Practice the basics.
          Build on the basics.
          ALWAYS go back and practice the basics.

          I have rifles with no iron sights. If the scope goes, the rifle is scrap iron if I can't get another scope, IF you can find/afford another scope.
          If a rifle has iron sights, you may lose a degree of accuracy down range, but the rifle will still be useful.

          I'm all about "arn" sights!
          Last edited by FirstBubba; 04-27-2021, 08:21 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dewman View Post
            I had asked this same question on F&S site on 8-18-2020. Wonder if things might of changed for some by now? In my experience the biggest benefit to a front sight hood is to protect a soft case from getting disemboweled by the front sight in the event you don't unzip it far enough and yank the gun out. I've seen this for myself. If I have a gun with opens then they are sighted in, scope or not. If no sights (smooth barrel) I don't sweat it. If I travel to hunt I carry a spare gun ready to go. Things happen. Not often, but sometimes. Reflexes and red dots have replaced opens for me up close but I put no trust in a battery.
            Here's the link:
            Open sights, still relevant? - Field and Stream Questions and Answers

            I removed the sights on my Remington 788 in in the mid 90's and have no regrets. The parts are in a zip lock bag but will probably never be re-installed.

            My eyesight isn't good enough for consistent accuracy shooting with open sights. I'd only feel comfortable out to a couple hundred yards.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the link PH.

              I’d forgotten about that one Dewman, it was a good read again. I’m just glad I didn’t contradict myself. I had a similar soft case experience with my 835 at a Hunter Ed class years ago. Got home and the front site was missing from the rib along with the plastic push pin that sat in the bead hole as a stop. Figured out it popped off when I pulled the gun out of the case. Replacement was cheap enough fortunately.


              FB; Turns out the GMC pickup I stumbled into for the boy is a stick. Took him a bit but he got it. Cool thing is I don’t have to worry about his friends wanting to drive it. Hauled 2,240 pounds of bagged concrete mix home with it after work yesterday.


              7F08042D-73B2-47AF-A6D3-865B66F36545.jpeg

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                Thanks for the link PH.

                I’d forgotten about that one Dewman, it was a good read again. I’m just glad I didn’t contradict myself. I had a similar soft case experience with my 835 at a Hunter Ed class years ago. Got home and the front site was missing from the rib along with the plastic push pin that sat in the bead hole as a stop. Figured out it popped off when I pulled the gun out of the case. Replacement was cheap enough fortunately.


                FB; Turns out the GMC pickup I stumbled into for the boy is a stick. Took him a bit but he got it. Cool thing is I don’t have to worry about his friends wanting to drive it. Hauled 2,240 pounds of bagged concrete mix home with it after work yesterday.


                7F08042D-73B2-47AF-A6D3-865B66F36545.jpeg
                You got that right!
                Started both kids with an automatic. As soon as I felt comfortable with their "driving" ability, we went standard.
                They spent many days circling our little 4 acre pasture. They learned to drive, never tore down fence or barn.
                First pickup I ever saw with an automatic transmission was about a '65 or '66 Chevy half ton.
                That thing wouldn't pull a marshmallow off a cooking stick!
                Last edited by FirstBubba; 04-27-2021, 12:29 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  "... the GMC pickup I stumbled into for the boy is a stick. ..."

                  Another little "side" note. (OR...parents know best! LOL!)

                  As a sophomore in HS, my dad insisted I enroll in "Typing I"! 😖! WHY? I don't care if I can type or not!
                  At the end of the first semester, I could type 36 wpm. The rest of the class was barely doing 25 wpm.
                  By the time I finished "Typing II" at the end of my Junior year, or 4 semesters, all my class mates were punching out 60 to 90 wpm! I was stuck at 48 wpm!* LOL!
                  No matter, thirty plus years of my working life was spent sitting behind a keyboard! 😀 Thanks Pop!

                  * - about a week before "Typing II" finals, a horse threw me and I broke my collar bone.
                  I was the only one in class that took a "written" test for my "Typing II" final! 😉!
                  Last edited by FirstBubba; 04-27-2021, 12:46 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, surprisingly, this thread has wandered into stick shifts and typing!

                    I'm careful when using soft cases to haul iron-sighted long arms. They're mainly for canoeing because hard cases are cumbersome in a small boat.

                    I learned to drive a stick-shift truck when I was eleven years old. My first car had three on the column. The last stick-shift I owned was a 91 Honda Accord EX with moon-roof. Even in automatic cars, I move my hand to the gear shift when slowing for a turn - old habit.
                    Last edited by PigHunter; 04-27-2021, 02:15 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, pighunter, iron sights, standard transmissions and manual typewriters are pretty much a thing of the past.
                      ...along with El Paso Weaver scopes, Vernier tang sights and Western Union telegrams!
                      Just a nostalgia thing. LOL!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PigHunter View Post
                        Well, surprisingly, this thread has wandered into stick shifts and typing!

                        I'm careful when using soft cases to haul iron-sighted long arms. They're mainly for canoeing because hard cases are cumbersome in a small boat.

                        I learned to drive a stick-shift truck when I was eleven years old. My first car had three on the column. The last stick-shift I owned was a 91 Honda Accord EX with moon-roof. Even in automatic cars, I move my hand to the gear shift when slowing for a turn - old habit.
                        I’ve run one particular 10 speed in winter the past 18 years, the last five or six summers I alternate to another truck of the same make and similar setup that is an automatic. It takes about a week for me to stop trying to hit the clutch and gear shift every time I release the parking brakes.

                        Similar story, in high school a good friend’s family had three different standards with reverse in a different location. We were out in the car his sister normally ran, stopped for lunch at a fast food joint and when we left he inadvertently threw it in first and slammed the curb when he let the clutch out. No damage to the vehicle but startled the heck out of us.


                        All spare gun parts go into ziplocks, either labeled with a sharpie or a paper note inside of they go to.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Had the same situation one time fitch270.
                          '96 2500 5 spd - reverse was far right down
                          '01 3500 6 spd - reverse was far right up
                          '06 3500 6 spd - reverse was far left down

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Anyone heard the story about front sights, pistols, and grizzly bears?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Amflyer View Post
                              Anyone heard the story about front sights, pistols, and grizzly bears?
                              Pistols or revolvers? ...or does it REALLY matter?
                              Ramp or Partridge front sight?

                              Comment

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