Top Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

To be drop safe? Or have a good trigger?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • To be drop safe? Or have a good trigger?

    In September 2016 Thompson Center issued a recall on their Compass line of rifles due to them not being drop safe. It seems their solution to the problem was to increase the weight of the trigger spring, resulting in a horrible(as in milspec AR) trigger as per factory setting. In order to get the pull down to a usable weight, I removed the jam nut and lock tited the adjustment nut. As set, I would estimate the trigger pull at 2.5-3 pounds, which I find quite usable for hunting.

    But, with the trigger set to a lower weight of pull, the rifle IS NOT DROP SAFE! If dropped from a sufficient height withe the safety in the FIRE position, the rifle CAN fire. However, with the safety ON, the rifle is perfectly drop safe.

    So, my question is, is this really a problem?

    For me and my rifle I say it's not. My reason being that I don't disengage the safety of until I'm ready to fire and then immediately reengage it after the shot, which means the only time the rifle is not drop safe is when I have the most control of it.

    What say you?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Your reasoning is sound, but there is an old saying that you cannot depend on mechanical safeties in firearms.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
      Your reasoning is sound, but there is an old saying that you cannot depend on mechanical safeties in firearms.
      Which is why muzzle control is so important.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have always taken pause when it comes to customizing products designed by engineers,most times this voids any warranties and places fault on the novice that believes they have a superior knowledge than the developers.This is not to say everyone is a novice,or modifying can,t be an improvement ,but should be left to certified individuals ,especially when it comes to the intricacies of firearms. Thompson should offer to refund this product if the modifications resulted in unsatisfactory trigger performance.

        Comment


        • #5
          That's a very intuitive post Red Angus thanks for providing the information and visible layout.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
            Your reasoning is sound, but there is an old saying that you cannot depend on mechanical safeties in firearms.
            I'm not a fan of changing factory trigger setting. What ever the mfg reason is!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 6phunter View Post
              I have always taken pause when it comes to customizing products designed by engineers,most times this voids any warranties and places fault on the novice that believes they have a superior knowledge than the developers.This is not to say everyone is a novice,or modifying can,t be an improvement ,but should be left to certified individuals ,especially when it comes to the intricacies of firearms. Thompson should offer to refund this product if the modifications resulted in unsatisfactory trigger performance.
              The rifle is advertised as having an adjustable trigger(original advertising claimed 3-5 pounds), which is true in that it could have been made substantially heavier.
              Imo, the engineers made a trigger whose pull actually quite good when set to a lower weight, it just had the misfortune of not being drop safe when set in such a way. For which T/C's solution was to install a heavier spring rather than redesigning the trigger to be drop safe without being excessively heavy. Unfortunately, I didn't realize this until after I'd purchased the rifle, however, I like the rifle so I opted to lighten the trigger. And, as I mentioned above, the only time the rifle isn't drop safe is when it's to my shoulder and I'm ready to squeeze the trigger.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 6phunter View Post
                That's a very intuitive post Red Angus thanks for providing the information and visible layout.
                Thank you.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Too bad they can't figure out a way to have both. I often keep the safety off while still hunting in an area I know I may see deer, and while I do my best not to drop the rifle or fall, I'm known to be clumsy lol

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Outlaw View Post
                    Too bad they can't figure out a way to have both. I often keep the safety off while still hunting in an area I know I may see deer, and while I do my best not to drop the rifle or fall, I'm known to be clumsy lol
                    Oh,no that just wrong ,recipe for disaster,keep that safety on ,it only takes a fraction of a second to put on fire,sorry outlaw but I wouldn't, hunt with you,or want to be in same woods, practice safe handling at all times , ask any range officer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
                      Your reasoning is sound, but there is an old saying that you cannot depend on mechanical safeties in firearms.
                      I don't mess with triggers, especially those on Remington 700's I have. I have never had a problem with them and don't want one now. To clean them I wash them in K-1 and just let it evaporate - no additional oil.

                      I have a lot of different triggers on my firearms and I just learn to adapt to them. Remingtons, Browning, Weatherby, Mauser Military, Steyr-Mannlicher double set triggers, NEF, and on and on.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Outlaw View Post
                        Too bad they can't figure out a way to have both. I often keep the safety off while still hunting in an area I know I may see deer, and while I do my best not to drop the rifle or fall, I'm known to be clumsy lol
                        Outlaw; bad idea, drop safe or not.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I say if your going to be messing with triggers you should have a trigger pull gauge.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                            I say if your going to be messing with triggers you should have a trigger pull gauge.
                            That's one piece of equipment I haven't acquired yet, but I agree that I should have one.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                              I say if your going to be messing with triggers you should have a trigger pull gauge.
                              I bought one after getting a CZ 455, they have adjustable triggers as well. Out of the box it was 3 1/2 lbs and very clean. I only use the rifle for an indoor offhand league, you have to single load. Rarely use the safety. Shot it for a full season, the trigger broke in to 3 1/4 lbs. This past summer I dropped it down to 2 3/4 lbs, passed the bump test numerous times. Halfway through the league this year and it still catches me off guard once in a while. I certainly wouldn't hunt with it as is wearing gloves.

                              I was surprised after checking all my other rifles, I thought a few were very heavy but it turns out none were over 4 1/2 lbs.

                              This post got me to thinking;
                              Economy guns and adjustable triggers, almost seems like a bad idea don't it?

                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Outdoor Life's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Outdoor Life, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on outdoorlife.com.

                              Right Rail 1 Ad

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2 Ad

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3 Ad

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X