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For the past two years I have started to deer hunt with a .270. I've done my homework and had quite a bit of range time with my

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  • For the past two years I have started to deer hunt with a .270. I've done my homework and had quite a bit of range time with my

    For the past two years I have started to deer hunt with a .270. I've done my homework and had quite a bit of range time with my new Savage. I have found that my rifle is the most accurate with the Winchester Supreme ballistic tip bullet in 130 grain. I hunt alot over soybeans which means that I can have shots at 200 yds plus so accuracy is a must. My problem is that the deer I don't drop barely bleed much at all and blood trailing is difficult at best. On opening day last weekend I shot a nice 10 pointer approx. 145yds away and it fell where I shot it. Troubling to me is that the exit hole and the entry hole were almost the same size. and there were only two spots of blood an the ground about the size of a nickle. I wouldn't be as worried except I shot two does that ran off that were almost not recovered because of this. Any suggestions???

  • #2
    Where was the shot on these deer? High shoulder/neck shot will almost always drop them right in there tracks. A heart shot will kill them in under 50 yards. Dont worry, you will get better at trailing blood trails as you do it more and more often. Theres people who would call what you call impossible easy just because theyve trailed so many deer. Also look for blood on elevated things, it isnt always laying right there on the ground. They may break a branch or rub some blood on it, just look for any lead on the trailing job. Remember where your last blood is incase you need to go back and try again.

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    • #3
      Where was the shot on these deer? High shoulder/neck shot will almost always drop them right in there tracks. A heart shot will kill them in under 50 yards. Dont worry, you will get better at trailing blood trails as you do it more and more often. Theres people who would call what you call impossible easy just because theyve trailed so many deer. Also look for blood on elevated things, it isnt always laying right there on the ground. They may break a branch or rub some blood on it, just look for any lead on the trailing job. Remember where your last blood is incase you need to go back and try again.

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      • #4
        I've had similar results with that bullet in a 7mm Mag. Some of the bullets performed excellent others did not. Basically if it hit a bone the bullet expanded like it should, if it didn't then it zipped right through. I would try some different bullets and find another that meets your accuracy expectations.

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        • #5
          hawkeye on the right trail,try diff ammo. remmington core lok is my favorite

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          • #6
            Try the Barnes VOR-TX
            130 gr Tipped Triple-Shock X Hollow Point -

            Barnes' TTSX bullets feature a polymer tipped solid-copper construction The polymer tipped projectile forces the hollow point bullet to expand even faster. The TSX bullet is designed to expand into four sharp-edged copper petals upon contact destroying tissue, bone, and vital organs for a quick kill. Cabela's has them.

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            • #7
              I think JM has a valid question. Often, when shot perfectly in the heart, the heart quits pumping and very little blood trail is left until the lungs fill with blood. I've had this happen with a muzzle loader and there were good size entry and exit wounds from the 430 grain maxi ball slug. A good neck shot always drops them in their tracks.

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              • #8
                I've shot a couple deer in the ribs only and the exit would isn't much but still an adequate blood trail. I do believe as some others have mentioned that a different bullet may be needed. Rem Core Lokt's do expand well on light skinned game. I've also had good luck with Hornaday SST's.

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                • #9
                  I would suggest a switch to Remingotn Core-Lokt ammo. Never had a problem with them and everyone i hunt with uses them without trouble.

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                  • #10
                    The 270 is one good caliber, and a great one for long range shooting. The bullet selection today is mind blowing. I would suggest a bullet like the 130gr Nosler ballistic tip or the Hornady 130gr SST. If you reload the loads are endless that you can pick. The Barnes bullet like the TTSX is supposed to be a awesome bullet but I have not killed a deer with one yet its what I'm using this deer season in my 25-06. I will let you know how it does. The deer you have shot and ran off with the same size entrance and exit hole, the bullet failed to expand, this is what companies like Nosler, Horandy and Barnes claim there bullets won't do even if the bullet does not hit bone. I have shot more than a few whitetail with Nosler ballistic tips and they preformed really well. I'm just trying out the Barnes bullets this year because I reload and I like to tinker, plus the TTSX is Barnes Claim to fame improved from the TSX.

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                    • #11
                      I had this happen as well but I soon discovered it wasn't that my bullets were'nt expanding it was that my bullets were turned into shrapnel over expanding leaving a small exit hole, hence the dropped in its tracks effect. Try a bit tougher bullet swift scirocco or something from Nosler's bonded line this seems to be true of fast steppers like the 270 and the 300 mags how do I know? I found the bullet fragments from a 270 winchester silver tip from a winchester super grade in the chest cavity of a small doe no exit hole shot at 150yds estimated instead of switching bullets I thought bigger rifle 300 win mag same deal there until I bought a box of swift scirocco's good luck and good hunting

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