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Why is rifling twists always to the right? Is it because the way machinery is set up to spin clockwise when compressing? My questioning is because everything in the northern hemisphere naturally spins counter clockwise, draining water, tornadoes, ect

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  • #16
    Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
    According to numerous articles written in NRA publications, there is no real reason--except for tradition.
    There is some historical evidence that the Brits believed left-handed twist imparts slight leftward bullet drift which would compensate for a right-handed shooter's trigger pull.
    After the revolutionary war, Americans wanted to be and show they were independent of Britain. Webster expressed independence with the American version of English while writing his Webster dictionary. He is the one responsible for dropping the unnecessary U's and changing S's and C's around. The American gun manufacturer's changed the rifling twist to the right, clockwise and since then that's the way they've always done it.
    To make this easy to remember, if you buy a rifle made in a country where they drive on the wrong side the road the rifling will likely turn to the left. If you purchase the rifle made where they drive on the right side of the road, the rifling will turn right.
    That is really something to know Charlie. If there is ever a Trivial pursuit Game based on firearms that will be a question.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Michael Christensen View Post
      Just read in some places that the Coriolis Effect will not effect a bullets flight because it is to small and the flight duration is to short.
      Now I know why I've been missing! I've been shooting counter clockwise bullets in my clockwise rifled gun.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Okwaho View Post
        That might be a good question for Field and Stream's "Ask Petzal."
        In truth, I'm no great fan of David E. Petzal. I've learned a good bit from him over the years, but the "nasty old curmudgeon" persona is just like the Bill Heavey "I can't do anything right but I can sure be sarcastic" persona. Funny at times, but generally just stupid. I think Petzal's thing is probably more authentic than Heavey's, and he does still manage to write without writing about himself (much), but sometimes all the Petzal-worship ("Mighty Petzal!) on Field and Stream is just too much. Some of those guys sound like teenaged girls at a Justin Bieber concert. // Charlie, funny you should say that: I did win one of Snow's contests, that comment-drawing for the Magpul bag. Actually, I think it was Ms. Krebs who did the drawing, but Snow's the one who sent it. I meant to tell you guys that. And I'll tell you, that's a good bag; very sturdy. Great, now he'll probably make me send it back. Honestly, I didn't know OL had a question-and-answer column like Petzal's.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JM View Post
          Good question...hopefully someone on here knows more than me because I'm interested now. Not all guns have rifling going the same way. Yes, the vast majority of guns will spin bullets clockwise, but there are some that spin counter-clockwise(can't think of any off the top of my head though). I think the biggest reason most bullets spin clockwise is because of the popularity and machinery used to make them(same tool manufacturers for multiple gun makers). I think the spin rate/twist rate is the only real thing to worry about. I can't think of a scenario when the direction of spin would matter.
          Marine Corp Snipers Must take into account the Coriolis Effect as that is because the Earth spins in one direction ( face North and it is from Right To Left) and a bullet may fly rather straight; BUT the target is Not where it was when the bullet was fired. Long range .50 snipers are well aware of this effect as are the others at Long ranges. Barrel twist rates also affect the stability of a round at long ranges to a modest degree and twist rates affect what the bullet does on impact. Early Vietnam M16's had a twist rate of 1/10; on impact the bullet could follow a muscle group from thigh to abdomen. Know of 1 hit that got a man in the gut and it came out of his upper right chest.
          1/12 is Much more stable and drills a hole instead of flipping end for end in some cases. The UN griped; said that they were too inhumane for warfare(?) in .223. 'When if warfare ever 'humane?' Direction of twist Might effect the bullet's point of impact a bit more with rh instead of lh twist. Hmmm, any master Sniper's on here ; Marine Instructors perhaps?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Okwaho View Post
            That might be a good question for Field and Stream's "Ask Petzal."
            Hmm, I wonder if that's enough to get you out of the Snow-"doghouse"? Hope you have a different username on F&S or the "Mighty Petzel" is going to come down on you Heavily.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
              I don't know, I know there are some LH twist barrels out there. This just came up at my local gun shop. He'd gotten some of the polycase ammo in. I questioned the same thing only because the bullets sure looked like they were designed in such a way to impart spin (in the LH direction oddly enough) and I wondered if they'd perform the same in LH and RH.
              Hi...!!

              You're talking about shotgun shells, right...?? If so, do the 'twists' in the slug ACTUALLY impart a spin...?? Somehow, I don't think so...!!

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              • #22
                The RH spin was to compensate for the torque imparted to the firearm for a RH shooter. That was the thinking years ago, don't know how true it holds.

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