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Synthetic vs. wood rifle/shotgun stocks - which do you prefer and why?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Kody View Post
    I love the look and feel of a wood stocked rifle or shotgun. So much the better with fine checkering or scroll work and beautiful wood grain features I have a real aversion to those synthetic stocks but sometimes function has to take priority over beauty and style. I shoot heavy 3" and 3 1/2" 12 guage rounds. The recoil is as hard on the firearm as it is on your shoulder. I have split the wood fore end on my past autoloader. So, I acquired a 3 1/2 "synthetic camo stock Beretta A 400 with the recoil reduction in the butt end and within the pistol grip of the stock. It may not be as good to look at but it is a real pleasure to shoot. It is by far the best shotgun I have ever owned.
    my new Sako .338 is a laminate stock which is a nice compromise. I have never liked the look of lamimate stock in the past but this one is growning on me.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JM View Post
      I love wood stocks, and I like the look of scratches even more.
      So I've been thinking about this, and I was wondering - since you say you like scratches, if you were buying a used gun, would you follow the standard practice of not paying as much if it had some external wear, like scratches? Or would you pay the same price as if the gun was in pristine condition? In other words, does it matter to you who put the scratches on there, and how?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
        Web site erased my answer. 30-06 went back to wood. .300WbyMag went to synthetic. All others are wood except my .17WSM Savage.
        This is the Weatherby Mk V with both stocks.
        Does it hold the same POI with both stocks?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Kody View Post
          I love the look and feel of a wood stocked rifle or shotgun. So much the better with fine checkering or scroll work and beautiful wood grain features I have a real aversion to those synthetic stocks but sometimes function has to take priority over beauty and style. I shoot heavy 3" and 3 1/2" 12 guage rounds. The recoil is as hard on the firearm as it is on your shoulder. I have split the wood fore end on my past autoloader. So, I acquired a 3 1/2 "synthetic camo stock Beretta A 400 with the recoil reduction in the butt end and within the pistol grip of the stock. It may not be as good to look at but it is a real pleasure to shoot. It is by far the best shotgun I have ever owned.
          I'm not a big fan of laminate stocks either. My brother has a muzzleloader with a laminate stock, and it just looks too fake to me.

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          • #20
            My shotguns all have wood stocks. If I still hunted waterfowl I might consider a synthetic stock. The rifle I use the most for big game is a Savage Model 116 FHSS and is synthetic. Weather does not change POI and that is a big plus.

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            • #21
              Hi...


              Wood...wood...wood...all the way...!! I just like the looks and feel of it...!!


              And, I enjoy oiling them up once in a while, too...!!

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                Web site erased my answer. 30-06 went back to wood. .300WbyMag went to synthetic. All others are wood except my .17WSM Savage.
                This is the Weatherby Mk V with both stocks.
                Hi...


                They're both beautiful stocks...!!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JM View Post
                  I love wood stocks, and I like the look of scratches even more.
                  I'd pay more if they were done in a nice decorative pattern as well as well detailed checkering.
                  No, there's no way I'd intentionally pay more for a chipped and scratch stock.
                  Good point, that, but earned as a sign of my own history with it, or maybe someone important to me, yes, perfectly acceptable.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by JM View Post
                    I love wood stocks, and I like the look of scratches even more.
                    I just read the comments here, so I'm sorry for jumping in a bit late. If I buy a used gun, I want it to be as free of marks as possible. As my family or I use it, we know the story of the scratches and that adds to the luster of the gun for me. In my lifetime, there will never be another buyer of a gun I own, so the marks become part of our family history that will be passed down with the gun.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by JM View Post
                      I love wood stocks, and I like the look of scratches even more.
                      Good one jcarlin. I'm relieved to see that you are in possession of your sanity - I was wondering what I would do if you said you'd pay up for a scratched gun! Lol But let me throw another scenario out there, just for the sake of discussion; if a gun had historical significance - let's say it had been used in the Civil War - would scratches or other wear from that time period still be a turn-off if you were considering purchasing it?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                        Web site erased my answer. 30-06 went back to wood. .300WbyMag went to synthetic. All others are wood except my .17WSM Savage.
                        This is the Weatherby Mk V with both stocks.
                        Both stocks are bedded.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by JM View Post
                          I love wood stocks, and I like the look of scratches even more.
                          huntfishtrap, I think you have to take into account the context of the scratches and age of the rifle as well. I would almost expect that a 150 year old rifle to have more than a few scratches on it where as some made in the 80's or 90's not to have that much wear and tear on the stock.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by JM View Post
                            I love wood stocks, and I like the look of scratches even more.
                            huntfishtrap, I agree with Ozark, it's all context.
                            I was laughing when I saw your question because it reminded me of an experience a few years ago. I had pitched in to help a co-workers son on his Eagle Scout project a few years ago. They were Mormon, and myself and one other co-worker were the only available targets for the new teenage Elders who were just embarking on the evangelical portion of their lives. One young man opened a conversation with "Do you want to find more happiness in your life." Which I thought was a brilliant opening. I chuckled and politely said "It's a great starter, because who is going to try to defend the position that they do not want more happiness. I'm here to happily swing a hammer today, but I'm not looking for a new spiritual path."

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                            • #29
                              Plain and simple I like guns, all guns.

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                              • #30
                                Synthetic stocks are more efficient, lower cost, and less upkeep. I have both, but my most recent purchase has a walnut stock the beauty is so fine it brings tears to my eyes.

                                Comment

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