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I am thinking about getting back into backpacking/camping, after a number of years of not doing it. We'd go camping quite a bit when I was a kid, but for a variety of reasons I haven't gone in probably 7 or 8 years. What are some things a relative be

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  • I am thinking about getting back into backpacking/camping, after a number of years of not doing it. We'd go camping quite a bit when I was a kid, but for a variety of reasons I haven't gone in probably 7 or 8 years. What are some things a relative be

    I am thinking about getting back into backpacking/camping, after a number of years of not doing it. We'd go camping quite a bit when I was a kid, but for a variety of reasons I haven't gone in probably 7 or 8 years. What are some things a relative beginner like myself should be looking at getting?

  • #2
    Car camping, you probably don't need much you don't have if you're a rural guy who hunts and fishes and decent gear for it is cheap.
    Decent tent, ok sleeping bags, stove, light, cooler, cookware..


    Backpacking, size and weight considerations are king, plus there's no "I'll just quick run to Walmart" so planning is key.
    This could go on for a realllly long one. I'd be happy to send you my typical backpacking checklist and a gear rundown, but not sure how to make that happen. Or can discuss on the open. Last year I spent nights in my 30' trailer, in a 6 man "camping" tent, a solo backpack tent, and a really uncomfortable one under the stars. Some of that gear does well in all roles. Much of it is too heavy for backpacking or the backpacking stuff lacks utility that if you didn't have to carry it on your back, you wouldn't use it. I've got my backpack load out down to a relatively inexpensive 25-30lbs if I'm on my own for just a couple of days, I end up carrying about 50-60lbs if my wife and kids are along.

    So I guess a good start is a couple of questions. What do you have, and which are you really going for? Do you want your equipment to serve well in both roles?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
      Car camping, you probably don't need much you don't have if you're a rural guy who hunts and fishes and decent gear for it is cheap.
      Decent tent, ok sleeping bags, stove, light, cooler, cookware..


      Backpacking, size and weight considerations are king, plus there's no "I'll just quick run to Walmart" so planning is key.
      This could go on for a realllly long one. I'd be happy to send you my typical backpacking checklist and a gear rundown, but not sure how to make that happen. Or can discuss on the open. Last year I spent nights in my 30' trailer, in a 6 man "camping" tent, a solo backpack tent, and a really uncomfortable one under the stars. Some of that gear does well in all roles. Much of it is too heavy for backpacking or the backpacking stuff lacks utility that if you didn't have to carry it on your back, you wouldn't use it. I've got my backpack load out down to a relatively inexpensive 25-30lbs if I'm on my own for just a couple of days, I end up carrying about 50-60lbs if my wife and kids are along.

      So I guess a good start is a couple of questions. What do you have, and which are you really going for? Do you want your equipment to serve well in both roles?
      Initially it would be either car camping, or relatively short weekend-type trips. No backcountry treks yet. At this point, I don't have much. Sleeping bag that is probably still in good shape, older tent that's way bigger than I need (I think it's a 6-man?), and some of the basic cookware, etc. Being on a budget, the more versatile the equipment, the better. I'd be grateful for any advice you might have. If you want to get in touch with me via email, you can do so through charlie elk's website. If you want to do that, I'll let him know it's okay to give you my info.

      Comment


      • #4
        We used to camp alongside a river or lake quite often when the weather was nice(when a tent and a basic sleeping bag is all you need). Bring some staple snacks, but rely on catching a few fish for meals. Fish is extremely easy to cook, which is a plus. Fun way to spend a don't know what to do type of weekend.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JM View Post
          We used to camp alongside a river or lake quite often when the weather was nice(when a tent and a basic sleeping bag is all you need). Bring some staple snacks, but rely on catching a few fish for meals. Fish is extremely easy to cook, which is a plus. Fun way to spend a don't know what to do type of weekend.
          What'd you do about bugs? They're usually horrible near water in the warmer months here.

          Comment


          • #6
            Good boots is where you start. Don't spare the $$ for your feet. A fancy pack or tent is not really necessary. You can make do with even marginal stuff. But marginal on your feet will be a disaster.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JM View Post
              We used to camp alongside a river or lake quite often when the weather was nice(when a tent and a basic sleeping bag is all you need). Bring some staple snacks, but rely on catching a few fish for meals. Fish is extremely easy to cook, which is a plus. Fun way to spend a don't know what to do type of weekend.
              A good tent will keep them out....Thermacell(would also work in the tent) for when sitting around the tent or some stick in the ground candles(can't remember that they are called but the ones for bugs.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                Car camping, you probably don't need much you don't have if you're a rural guy who hunts and fishes and decent gear for it is cheap.
                Decent tent, ok sleeping bags, stove, light, cooler, cookware..


                Backpacking, size and weight considerations are king, plus there's no "I'll just quick run to Walmart" so planning is key.
                This could go on for a realllly long one. I'd be happy to send you my typical backpacking checklist and a gear rundown, but not sure how to make that happen. Or can discuss on the open. Last year I spent nights in my 30' trailer, in a 6 man "camping" tent, a solo backpack tent, and a really uncomfortable one under the stars. Some of that gear does well in all roles. Much of it is too heavy for backpacking or the backpacking stuff lacks utility that if you didn't have to carry it on your back, you wouldn't use it. I've got my backpack load out down to a relatively inexpensive 25-30lbs if I'm on my own for just a couple of days, I end up carrying about 50-60lbs if my wife and kids are along.

                So I guess a good start is a couple of questions. What do you have, and which are you really going for? Do you want your equipment to serve well in both roles?
                I'm game.
                I have done some winnowing of equipment and nothing of mine is terribly expensive. My first backpack trip was an overnight run by a former eagle scout who "took care of everything." The average pack was a no BS 85lbs. While I appreciate his willingness to plan for the newbies, that was a death march. Was an eye opener on my early "what do I really need, and how light can I get it in my budget" planning. I'm no expert, but I'm happy with what I've got it down to in being covered for my needs while not being overburdened so I can enjoy it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
                  Good boots is where you start. Don't spare the $$ for your feet. A fancy pack or tent is not really necessary. You can make do with even marginal stuff. But marginal on your feet will be a disaster.
                  I agree. Thankfully I hunt and day-hike a lot, so I already have good footwear.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                    Car camping, you probably don't need much you don't have if you're a rural guy who hunts and fishes and decent gear for it is cheap.
                    Decent tent, ok sleeping bags, stove, light, cooler, cookware..


                    Backpacking, size and weight considerations are king, plus there's no "I'll just quick run to Walmart" so planning is key.
                    This could go on for a realllly long one. I'd be happy to send you my typical backpacking checklist and a gear rundown, but not sure how to make that happen. Or can discuss on the open. Last year I spent nights in my 30' trailer, in a 6 man "camping" tent, a solo backpack tent, and a really uncomfortable one under the stars. Some of that gear does well in all roles. Much of it is too heavy for backpacking or the backpacking stuff lacks utility that if you didn't have to carry it on your back, you wouldn't use it. I've got my backpack load out down to a relatively inexpensive 25-30lbs if I'm on my own for just a couple of days, I end up carrying about 50-60lbs if my wife and kids are along.

                    So I guess a good start is a couple of questions. What do you have, and which are you really going for? Do you want your equipment to serve well in both roles?
                    Yikes. The most I've carried was about 65#, while packing out a deer. That was bad enough. I'll let charlie know you might be contacting him.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      To us camping by itself is not an activity rather camping is a means to the adventure. Where we pheasant in IA there is no lodging unless you want to commute to and from the hunting location. The first pic is the outside shortly after setting camp. The second is of the cozy inside, Vic likes his creature comforts.:-)
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A simple truck camp is another option. We use this when for whatever reason a tent setup is not allowed. My preference is to camp where ever the game is, plus it's nice to just wake up and hunt. Productive too. My suggestion is you practice different types of camping for all the different types of hunting.
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
                          To us camping by itself is not an activity rather camping is a means to the adventure. Where we pheasant in IA there is no lodging unless you want to commute to and from the hunting location. The first pic is the outside shortly after setting camp. The second is of the cozy inside, Vic likes his creature comforts.:-)
                          You use an elevated cot, charlie? Is that for you, or for Vic?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by charlie elk View Post
                            To us camping by itself is not an activity rather camping is a means to the adventure. Where we pheasant in IA there is no lodging unless you want to commute to and from the hunting location. The first pic is the outside shortly after setting camp. The second is of the cozy inside, Vic likes his creature comforts.:-)
                            We each have our own cot and sleeping bag. There's a propane Mr. Heater with carbon monoxide shut off, just in case. Nightime temps hover around zero late Dec. add in the windchill, Brrr. We do all the different camp types from bivouac to the cushy base camp in the pictures. All depends on what conditions allow.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't know if anyone is still watching this. I thought I sent an answer to both one of Huntfish and Charlie's comments.
                              Charlie, huntfishtrap mentioned using charlieelk.com to exchange contact info.
                              Other than getting sucked in to some interesting reading, I failed to find any way to contact you as the webmaster or any such way to do that.
                              If that's doable, I'd appreciate it.

                              Thank you sir.
                              All others- good reading there, worth checking out.

                              Comment

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