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  • Kids and knives, see first post.

    Kids and knives, see first post.

  • #2
    How old do they have to be when you trust them?
    The boy, age 7, cut his index a good one last night. He was using the serrated blade on his Leatherman Sidekick (just like dad's) to build/cut some plaything out of a cardboard box. I heard the 'ow', looked over "You hurt yourself." "Yes.. there's a lot of blood THERE'S A LOT OF BLOOD, I'M DRIPPING BLOOD ON MY GI!.."
    A bit longer and a hair deeper and I might have given a couple of stitches some thought. It was just deep enough that he left a trail between the living room floor and the bathroom where I cleaned and bandaged it.

    I'm not taking it away from him in any case. He's been shown the ropes and been good with it. He learned a lesson I know I did the same way and bet most of us have. It did get me thinking. Partly because due to the ground rules relayed to him, the first thing he said as I'm still holding a paper towel and some pressure on it waiting for the bleeding to slow down before cleaning and bandaging, tears in his eyes and shuddering breath, but biting back the whimpering that wants to come out "Does this mean you're taking my knives away?" "No, buddy, I think you just got a good lesson in being careful" <sniff>"Yeah."

    So how old or as in a lot of other things does it just depend on the kid?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
      How old do they have to be when you trust them?
      The boy, age 7, cut his index a good one last night. He was using the serrated blade on his Leatherman Sidekick (just like dad's) to build/cut some plaything out of a cardboard box. I heard the 'ow', looked over "You hurt yourself." "Yes.. there's a lot of blood THERE'S A LOT OF BLOOD, I'M DRIPPING BLOOD ON MY GI!.."
      A bit longer and a hair deeper and I might have given a couple of stitches some thought. It was just deep enough that he left a trail between the living room floor and the bathroom where I cleaned and bandaged it.

      I'm not taking it away from him in any case. He's been shown the ropes and been good with it. He learned a lesson I know I did the same way and bet most of us have. It did get me thinking. Partly because due to the ground rules relayed to him, the first thing he said as I'm still holding a paper towel and some pressure on it waiting for the bleeding to slow down before cleaning and bandaging, tears in his eyes and shuddering breath, but biting back the whimpering that wants to come out "Does this mean you're taking my knives away?" "No, buddy, I think you just got a good lesson in being careful" <sniff>"Yeah."

      So how old or as in a lot of other things does it just depend on the kid?
      Well jcarlin, I have cut myself more than once and I am a hell of a lot older than 7 ! So it can happen at any
      age and it will continue to happen with age also. I think you did the right thing not taken your son's knife
      away, nothing teaches better than a little pain now and then to help direct a youngster in the correct way. I
      must still have a lot of youngster in me because I am still learning too. When I was doing my taxidermy work
      it was me that kept bandage companies in business. The way you handled it is the most important thing and
      your boy will remember the kindness for a long long time.

      Comment


      • #4
        I remember my dad giving me a pocketknife when I was about that age, and one of my busybody big sisters saying something about me cutting myself. My dad's response was basically, Yeah, of course he's going to cut himself, just like he wipes out on his bike once in a while. That ended the discussion.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
          How old do they have to be when you trust them?
          The boy, age 7, cut his index a good one last night. He was using the serrated blade on his Leatherman Sidekick (just like dad's) to build/cut some plaything out of a cardboard box. I heard the 'ow', looked over "You hurt yourself." "Yes.. there's a lot of blood THERE'S A LOT OF BLOOD, I'M DRIPPING BLOOD ON MY GI!.."
          A bit longer and a hair deeper and I might have given a couple of stitches some thought. It was just deep enough that he left a trail between the living room floor and the bathroom where I cleaned and bandaged it.

          I'm not taking it away from him in any case. He's been shown the ropes and been good with it. He learned a lesson I know I did the same way and bet most of us have. It did get me thinking. Partly because due to the ground rules relayed to him, the first thing he said as I'm still holding a paper towel and some pressure on it waiting for the bleeding to slow down before cleaning and bandaging, tears in his eyes and shuddering breath, but biting back the whimpering that wants to come out "Does this mean you're taking my knives away?" "No, buddy, I think you just got a good lesson in being careful" <sniff>"Yeah."

          So how old or as in a lot of other things does it just depend on the kid?
          Thanks.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Okwaho View Post
            I remember my dad giving me a pocketknife when I was about that age, and one of my busybody big sisters saying something about me cutting myself. My dad's response was basically, Yeah, of course he's going to cut himself, just like he wipes out on his bike once in a while. That ended the discussion.
            Funny. He was saying that he's never bled so much before while I was giving it a minute to stem. My wife chimed in with "What about every time you fall off your bike?"
            "Oh yeah."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
              How old do they have to be when you trust them?
              The boy, age 7, cut his index a good one last night. He was using the serrated blade on his Leatherman Sidekick (just like dad's) to build/cut some plaything out of a cardboard box. I heard the 'ow', looked over "You hurt yourself." "Yes.. there's a lot of blood THERE'S A LOT OF BLOOD, I'M DRIPPING BLOOD ON MY GI!.."
              A bit longer and a hair deeper and I might have given a couple of stitches some thought. It was just deep enough that he left a trail between the living room floor and the bathroom where I cleaned and bandaged it.

              I'm not taking it away from him in any case. He's been shown the ropes and been good with it. He learned a lesson I know I did the same way and bet most of us have. It did get me thinking. Partly because due to the ground rules relayed to him, the first thing he said as I'm still holding a paper towel and some pressure on it waiting for the bleeding to slow down before cleaning and bandaging, tears in his eyes and shuddering breath, but biting back the whimpering that wants to come out "Does this mean you're taking my knives away?" "No, buddy, I think you just got a good lesson in being careful" <sniff>"Yeah."

              So how old or as in a lot of other things does it just depend on the kid?
              I was telling him I was about his age when my parents had given me one of those little microscope sets as a kid. Came with a scalpel, and jars that had stoppers that needed prying. I found out the hard way that the two shall not mix.
              Had a folder with a lock that was questionable close on my hand when trout fishing. I had flicked it to get something off the blade and it closed on my hand. A couple of lessons learned there starting with poor quality knives and firearms are not to be owned.
              Working on cars in winter teaches the same things about socket sets.

              Comment


              • #8
                Sounds to me like he learned a valuable lesson. Every kid has to cut themselves a few times, otherwise they wouldn't learn not to. Of course, some people never do learn not to, and keep right on cutting themselves. Yours truly is one of them; my hands have numerous scars to commemorate various mishaps with sharp cutting utensils. I was even stupid enough to catch 2 fingers on my left hand in a meat grinder last winter. DO NOT do that. I was fortunate that it was a manual grinder, or I might've lost half my hand.
                I think you handled it very well, no reason to take away his knife over a small accident. I can't remember how old I was when I got my first knife, but it was probably about 6 or 7. I still have it, although I don't use it any more. I'd say that 6-8 year old range is a good time, provided the kid is reasonably trustworthy. The act of giving them their first knife could also be a good time to go over some basic first-aid tips. As in: "Don't cut yourself, buddy, but if you do cut yourself, here's what to do".

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                  How old do they have to be when you trust them?
                  The boy, age 7, cut his index a good one last night. He was using the serrated blade on his Leatherman Sidekick (just like dad's) to build/cut some plaything out of a cardboard box. I heard the 'ow', looked over "You hurt yourself." "Yes.. there's a lot of blood THERE'S A LOT OF BLOOD, I'M DRIPPING BLOOD ON MY GI!.."
                  A bit longer and a hair deeper and I might have given a couple of stitches some thought. It was just deep enough that he left a trail between the living room floor and the bathroom where I cleaned and bandaged it.

                  I'm not taking it away from him in any case. He's been shown the ropes and been good with it. He learned a lesson I know I did the same way and bet most of us have. It did get me thinking. Partly because due to the ground rules relayed to him, the first thing he said as I'm still holding a paper towel and some pressure on it waiting for the bleeding to slow down before cleaning and bandaging, tears in his eyes and shuddering breath, but biting back the whimpering that wants to come out "Does this mean you're taking my knives away?" "No, buddy, I think you just got a good lesson in being careful" <sniff>"Yeah."

                  So how old or as in a lot of other things does it just depend on the kid?
                  I just hope that trail of blood didn't lead over carpeting. Blood and carpets don't mix.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                    How old do they have to be when you trust them?
                    The boy, age 7, cut his index a good one last night. He was using the serrated blade on his Leatherman Sidekick (just like dad's) to build/cut some plaything out of a cardboard box. I heard the 'ow', looked over "You hurt yourself." "Yes.. there's a lot of blood THERE'S A LOT OF BLOOD, I'M DRIPPING BLOOD ON MY GI!.."
                    A bit longer and a hair deeper and I might have given a couple of stitches some thought. It was just deep enough that he left a trail between the living room floor and the bathroom where I cleaned and bandaged it.

                    I'm not taking it away from him in any case. He's been shown the ropes and been good with it. He learned a lesson I know I did the same way and bet most of us have. It did get me thinking. Partly because due to the ground rules relayed to him, the first thing he said as I'm still holding a paper towel and some pressure on it waiting for the bleeding to slow down before cleaning and bandaging, tears in his eyes and shuddering breath, but biting back the whimpering that wants to come out "Does this mean you're taking my knives away?" "No, buddy, I think you just got a good lesson in being careful" <sniff>"Yeah."

                    So how old or as in a lot of other things does it just depend on the kid?
                    Everything's hardwood, engineered hardwood, or lineoleum at my place except the bedrooms. I grew up in fully carpeted houses. What a PIA with pets and kids.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                      Sounds to me like he learned a valuable lesson. Every kid has to cut themselves a few times, otherwise they wouldn't learn not to. Of course, some people never do learn not to, and keep right on cutting themselves. Yours truly is one of them; my hands have numerous scars to commemorate various mishaps with sharp cutting utensils. I was even stupid enough to catch 2 fingers on my left hand in a meat grinder last winter. DO NOT do that. I was fortunate that it was a manual grinder, or I might've lost half my hand.
                      I think you handled it very well, no reason to take away his knife over a small accident. I can't remember how old I was when I got my first knife, but it was probably about 6 or 7. I still have it, although I don't use it any more. I'd say that 6-8 year old range is a good time, provided the kid is reasonably trustworthy. The act of giving them their first knife could also be a good time to go over some basic first-aid tips. As in: "Don't cut yourself, buddy, but if you do cut yourself, here's what to do".
                      That's a good point. My older two have taken classes, and I try to teach him a lot of the little outdoors tips.. but haven't handled first aid with him.
                      Will do, sir.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think one of my worst self slices I was a young teenager. I don't remember why I decided to notch a fork in the end of that stick, but the damn thing had a rotten spot and just split right down to my thumb, split the nail and stopped at the bone. I can still feel that one in my memory.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                          How old do they have to be when you trust them?
                          The boy, age 7, cut his index a good one last night. He was using the serrated blade on his Leatherman Sidekick (just like dad's) to build/cut some plaything out of a cardboard box. I heard the 'ow', looked over "You hurt yourself." "Yes.. there's a lot of blood THERE'S A LOT OF BLOOD, I'M DRIPPING BLOOD ON MY GI!.."
                          A bit longer and a hair deeper and I might have given a couple of stitches some thought. It was just deep enough that he left a trail between the living room floor and the bathroom where I cleaned and bandaged it.

                          I'm not taking it away from him in any case. He's been shown the ropes and been good with it. He learned a lesson I know I did the same way and bet most of us have. It did get me thinking. Partly because due to the ground rules relayed to him, the first thing he said as I'm still holding a paper towel and some pressure on it waiting for the bleeding to slow down before cleaning and bandaging, tears in his eyes and shuddering breath, but biting back the whimpering that wants to come out "Does this mean you're taking my knives away?" "No, buddy, I think you just got a good lesson in being careful" <sniff>"Yeah."

                          So how old or as in a lot of other things does it just depend on the kid?
                          Amen to that. What really blows my mind are the houses with carpeted bathrooms. Can't understand why anyone would want that.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
                            How old do they have to be when you trust them?
                            The boy, age 7, cut his index a good one last night. He was using the serrated blade on his Leatherman Sidekick (just like dad's) to build/cut some plaything out of a cardboard box. I heard the 'ow', looked over "You hurt yourself." "Yes.. there's a lot of blood THERE'S A LOT OF BLOOD, I'M DRIPPING BLOOD ON MY GI!.."
                            A bit longer and a hair deeper and I might have given a couple of stitches some thought. It was just deep enough that he left a trail between the living room floor and the bathroom where I cleaned and bandaged it.

                            I'm not taking it away from him in any case. He's been shown the ropes and been good with it. He learned a lesson I know I did the same way and bet most of us have. It did get me thinking. Partly because due to the ground rules relayed to him, the first thing he said as I'm still holding a paper towel and some pressure on it waiting for the bleeding to slow down before cleaning and bandaging, tears in his eyes and shuddering breath, but biting back the whimpering that wants to come out "Does this mean you're taking my knives away?" "No, buddy, I think you just got a good lesson in being careful" <sniff>"Yeah."

                            So how old or as in a lot of other things does it just depend on the kid?
                            My wife wanted to do that when we first got married. I told her I'd do it, but if she thinks I stray on the floor now, it'll be intentional if she carpets the floor. Never came up again.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I know some people my age that I wouldn't trust with a knife(and no, I'm not only talking about a couple of my ex's). I grew up with parents that followed the "learn the hard way" teaching method. I basically had a free leash...which was both bad and good. The amount of times I had to hurt myself to learn not to do something is astounding, but I sure as heck learned from it has it happened. Getting hurt is one of the best ways to learn! Once it happens you don't really forget about it, haha. You will never be a hunter if all you do is watch hunting videos...you have to get out there yourself and make mistakes.

                              Comment

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