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I am pleased to report that I fished all day yesterday, tying only my usual unimproved clinch knot, and did not lose a single fish. True, my total take consisted of three 9-10 inch browns, one 10-11 inch smallmouth, and probably a dozen or so rock

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  • I am pleased to report that I fished all day yesterday, tying only my usual unimproved clinch knot, and did not lose a single fish. True, my total take consisted of three 9-10 inch browns, one 10-11 inch smallmouth, and probably a dozen or so rock

    I am pleased to report that I fished all day yesterday, tying only my usual unimproved clinch knot, and did not lose a single fish. True, my total take consisted of three 9-10 inch browns, one 10-11 inch smallmouth, and probably a dozen or so rock bass -- but by God the fact remains! Anyway, what a miserable day of fishing. The river was really low, temperatures in the high 80s, sun beating down on the water. The wet-wading was pleasant, but I should have just napped in the shade for most of the day. As I was driving home, I got to thinking about night-fishing. Do you do much? If so, for what, and what methods/bait/tackle do you use?

  • #2
    I do some bowfishing at night, if that counts. We often see a lot of game fish like bass, bluegills, etc. when we're out there after carp and buffalo, but I guess I just don't like rod-and-reel fishing well enough to do it at night. The most recent trip was 2 weeks ago to a lake in search of grass carp, and I saw a ton of really nice bass and 'gills. Kind of made me wish I'd taken a pole along.

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    • #3
      Well, I'd hope the knot would hold for those dinky fish, Tioughnioga! Just messing with you. Those are all fun fish to catch. We never really go after rock bass, but about once a year we will usually find a spot where they are just loaded and catch a bunch. From what we know they aren't worth keeping/eating. Ever tried them? I went fishing basically all weekend. Was a high of 99 degrees with like a 105 heat index. To boot we were on an aluminum boat that was modified to be a bass boat so it was not carpeted very well haha(the lake we went to had a HP limit so we couldn't take our normal boat out). Had to do a lot of swimming to break up the heat. We actually went night fishing on Saturday/Sunday morning, so funny that you would ask. We were just targetting catfish. We took these small clear floating bottles to act as a bobber and put a small glowstick inside(the glowsticks were like 1.5 inches long and a 1/4 inch thick) so that you can see it. We wanted to just attach them to the line above a normal bobber but couldn't figure out how, so opted for the clear bottles. Worked perfectly.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by JM View Post
        Well, I'd hope the knot would hold for those dinky fish, Tioughnioga! Just messing with you. Those are all fun fish to catch. We never really go after rock bass, but about once a year we will usually find a spot where they are just loaded and catch a bunch. From what we know they aren't worth keeping/eating. Ever tried them? I went fishing basically all weekend. Was a high of 99 degrees with like a 105 heat index. To boot we were on an aluminum boat that was modified to be a bass boat so it was not carpeted very well haha(the lake we went to had a HP limit so we couldn't take our normal boat out). Had to do a lot of swimming to break up the heat. We actually went night fishing on Saturday/Sunday morning, so funny that you would ask. We were just targetting catfish. We took these small clear floating bottles to act as a bobber and put a small glowstick inside(the glowsticks were like 1.5 inches long and a 1/4 inch thick) so that you can see it. We wanted to just attach them to the line above a normal bobber but couldn't figure out how, so opted for the clear bottles. Worked perfectly.
        I've never eaten a rock bass. They're like smallmouths and largmouths, at least in my experience: They're almost always hooked cleanly in the lip or jaw, easy to release. Plus, when I'm wading all day, I don't usually keep anything unless it's late and I get something pretty good, a nice trout or walleye (or if I suddenly realize that I didn't take anything out of the freezer for supper before leaving the house). Great idea with the glowsticks.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
          I do some bowfishing at night, if that counts. We often see a lot of game fish like bass, bluegills, etc. when we're out there after carp and buffalo, but I guess I just don't like rod-and-reel fishing well enough to do it at night. The most recent trip was 2 weeks ago to a lake in search of grass carp, and I saw a ton of really nice bass and 'gills. Kind of made me wish I'd taken a pole along.
          Carp-fishing (rod and reel) is about the only kind of night-fishing I ever really got into. I'd be still in the river fishing for trout or bass as it started to get dark, just about to head home, and I'd see the carp feeding their way upstream. I'd flip some stones and catch a few crayfish, crush them to get some good smelly juices flowing, and then cast upstream from where I saw the last carp. Lots of times I'd end up fishing til 10 or 11 o'clock. That was when I was still in my teens and twenties and generally fearless. I'd hook a big carp on the five-foot ultralight I'd been catching trout with, and have to follow it down the river in the dark to keep it from breaking off. I'd go off drop-offs, cut my legs up on fallen trees, all kinds of good fun. I'm kind of missing it, now that I talk about it, but I think I've outgrown that, plus I'm smarter now and wouldn't use such light tackle. Lots of those bigger carp I caught back then probably died after being released, since I never managed to land one until it was completely exhausted.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
            I do some bowfishing at night, if that counts. We often see a lot of game fish like bass, bluegills, etc. when we're out there after carp and buffalo, but I guess I just don't like rod-and-reel fishing well enough to do it at night. The most recent trip was 2 weeks ago to a lake in search of grass carp, and I saw a ton of really nice bass and 'gills. Kind of made me wish I'd taken a pole along.
            I meant that I'd crush the crawdads after putting one on my hook; my sentence made it sound like maybe I was catching enough to use them for chum.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JM View Post
              Well, I'd hope the knot would hold for those dinky fish, Tioughnioga! Just messing with you. Those are all fun fish to catch. We never really go after rock bass, but about once a year we will usually find a spot where they are just loaded and catch a bunch. From what we know they aren't worth keeping/eating. Ever tried them? I went fishing basically all weekend. Was a high of 99 degrees with like a 105 heat index. To boot we were on an aluminum boat that was modified to be a bass boat so it was not carpeted very well haha(the lake we went to had a HP limit so we couldn't take our normal boat out). Had to do a lot of swimming to break up the heat. We actually went night fishing on Saturday/Sunday morning, so funny that you would ask. We were just targetting catfish. We took these small clear floating bottles to act as a bobber and put a small glowstick inside(the glowsticks were like 1.5 inches long and a 1/4 inch thick) so that you can see it. We wanted to just attach them to the line above a normal bobber but couldn't figure out how, so opted for the clear bottles. Worked perfectly.
              @Tiough,
              You can buy like a 100 pack of the glowsticks of similar size I use for like $5 or less...much cheaper than a lighted bobber. I think I heard that rockbass have lots of parasites or worms or something and that is why they are bad for eating. We also do night fishing for...well pretty much everything actually. Mainly crappie since a friend of mine has a light system set up to attract crappie and other panfish for fishing at night off his dock. Cast out a few poles for catfish with a bell or something to alert you and can catch quite a few fish.

              Comment


              • #8
                We fished at night for bullheads on a inlet stream in the Adirondacks. A Coleman lantern and we would fish from the bank and almost fill a wash tub overnight.
                In the Western end of Lake Erie I have fished at night around the Islands for Walleye - just like the old timers did.
                I talked with a guy who has a house boat on Kentucky Lake and the thing there is a boat with lights shinning down to cause the Asian Carp to surface. They would then shoot with a arrow. A broker gives around $2 a lb as there is a market for the fish.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Got a slightly off-topic question for you, Tiough. Have you ever tried canned corn for carp bait? There are a couple of city-owned ponds in a town near me that are full of carp, and I thought I might try to catch a few just for the heck of it. I have heard that corn works well, but I've never tried it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                    Got a slightly off-topic question for you, Tiough. Have you ever tried canned corn for carp bait? There are a couple of city-owned ponds in a town near me that are full of carp, and I thought I might try to catch a few just for the heck of it. I have heard that corn works well, but I've never tried it.
                    I never have, but I've heard the same thing. Canned corn is even listed as a good carp bait on NY's Conservation Dept. webpage. I've also heard of carp-fishermen chumming with it, whether or not they actually bait their hooks with it; they use a big serving spoon to fling it out. I'm not too far from where there's a big carp tournament every year on the Seneca River, and I seem to remember reading about the really hardcore guys throwing out the corn to get the carp feeding and then using scented dough-balls for bait. Sounds like a lot of effort, when probably just corn on the hook works perfectly well. But then, effort's no big deal to some of those tournament guys; some of them come all the way from Europe, and they've got all kinds of secret recipes for their dough-balls, and some really bizarre-looking rod-and-reel rigs. Kind of impressive, really, and honestly I have more respect for them than I do for the so-called bass "pros." JMO. Anyway, I bet you'd catch plenty on corn. Let us know!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                      Got a slightly off-topic question for you, Tiough. Have you ever tried canned corn for carp bait? There are a couple of city-owned ponds in a town near me that are full of carp, and I thought I might try to catch a few just for the heck of it. I have heard that corn works well, but I've never tried it.
                      @hft,
                      I have. We have chummed with can corn and then thrown out bread balls on a hook into the chum. Works well. Haven't had a whole lot of luck with corn on a hook if chumming with it as well, but if not chumming corn will work.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                        Got a slightly off-topic question for you, Tiough. Have you ever tried canned corn for carp bait? There are a couple of city-owned ponds in a town near me that are full of carp, and I thought I might try to catch a few just for the heck of it. I have heard that corn works well, but I've never tried it.
                        Yeah, we tried chumming with corn for grass carp while bowfishing a few years ago. Didn't attract any grass carp, but the common carp seemed to like it. My one hang-up is how to get enough to stay on the hook. I'm not sure just impaling a few kernels will work. Will have to do some research on that.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We do night trolling for walleyes on Lake Erie pretty regularly. Many times I've been fishing all day and the bite is dead, then dusk hits and the fish turn on into the night. Only recommendation for night fishing is lots of lights (we have the boat rigged with extra LEDs for that) and patience. Every snag, snarl, birdsnest, or line twist you get is 10 times worse in the dark

                          Comment

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