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I've always tied a plain old clinch knot and never had it fail me. Big smallmouths and largemouths, big carp, big browns ... never had the knot give way. When I'm snagged and I have to break off, I never have the knot fail before my line snaps.

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  • I've always tied a plain old clinch knot and never had it fail me. Big smallmouths and largemouths, big carp, big browns ... never had the knot give way. When I'm snagged and I have to break off, I never have the knot fail before my line snaps.

    I've always tied a plain old clinch knot and never had it fail me. Big smallmouths and largemouths, big carp, big browns ... never had the knot give way. When I'm snagged and I have to break off, I never have the knot fail before my line snaps. Why, then, do I so often hear about the risks of using a plain unimproved clinch? What fishing knots do you tie?

  • #2
    I used to tie plain clinch knots, and I did have them fail several times. Usually when snagged on something, but a couple times with fish too. So now I tie a plain clinch, then add a double square knot on top. I usually go with 7 twists on the clinch, give or take one. A serious fisherman would probably laugh at my creation, but it works. Can't ever recall one of my super-duper knots failing.
    I see people touting an "improved" clinch knot, but I've never tried one.

    Comment


    • #3
      Lol, that's just how fisherman are. No matter what knot you tie someone will say there is a better option. Have you ever watched like a knot tying or filleting video on youtube? It's crazy how many people complain in the comments(I mean really, watch any filleting video on youtube and there will be 100 comments saying they did a crap job). I mean heck...as a little kid I just tied like 5 regular overhand knots of sometimes got fancy and used a surgeons knot first and I caught plenty of panfish casting off a dock with a bobber and a worm. If it works for your applications than ignore them. I use quite a few knots....I'd say probably 5 on a common basis for fishing. I know how to tie more than that, but often they are just unnecessary. Just depends on situation. Clinch knots usually only slip when they aren't looped enough from my experience. I don't use them often though...always an improved or trilene knot. Clinch knots also aren't the best option for certain line materials like fluorocarbon. The knot I use the most is the polymer knot...I've used it enough to the point where I can tie it with my eyes closed(seriously, it is a good skill to have when it's dark or when fishing with a crazy kid you can't take your eyes off of).

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
        I used to tie plain clinch knots, and I did have them fail several times. Usually when snagged on something, but a couple times with fish too. So now I tie a plain clinch, then add a double square knot on top. I usually go with 7 twists on the clinch, give or take one. A serious fisherman would probably laugh at my creation, but it works. Can't ever recall one of my super-duper knots failing.
        I see people touting an "improved" clinch knot, but I've never tried one.
        @hft,
        You must not of heard of the trilene knot. It is an improved-improved clinch knot, haha. They are actually quite easy to tie.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JM View Post
          Lol, that's just how fisherman are. No matter what knot you tie someone will say there is a better option. Have you ever watched like a knot tying or filleting video on youtube? It's crazy how many people complain in the comments(I mean really, watch any filleting video on youtube and there will be 100 comments saying they did a crap job). I mean heck...as a little kid I just tied like 5 regular overhand knots of sometimes got fancy and used a surgeons knot first and I caught plenty of panfish casting off a dock with a bobber and a worm. If it works for your applications than ignore them. I use quite a few knots....I'd say probably 5 on a common basis for fishing. I know how to tie more than that, but often they are just unnecessary. Just depends on situation. Clinch knots usually only slip when they aren't looped enough from my experience. I don't use them often though...always an improved or trilene knot. Clinch knots also aren't the best option for certain line materials like fluorocarbon. The knot I use the most is the polymer knot...I've used it enough to the point where I can tie it with my eyes closed(seriously, it is a good skill to have when it's dark or when fishing with a crazy kid you can't take your eyes off of).
          I realized after I posted that different knots work better with different kinds of line. I've never switched away from plain old mono, and I tend to forget about fluorocarbon and Spiderwire and whatever else is out there now.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
            I used to tie plain clinch knots, and I did have them fail several times. Usually when snagged on something, but a couple times with fish too. So now I tie a plain clinch, then add a double square knot on top. I usually go with 7 twists on the clinch, give or take one. A serious fisherman would probably laugh at my creation, but it works. Can't ever recall one of my super-duper knots failing.
            I see people touting an "improved" clinch knot, but I've never tried one.
            @JM, Nope, never heard of that knot. I'm not sure how it could be any better or easier to tie than what I use now, though.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JM View Post
              Lol, that's just how fisherman are. No matter what knot you tie someone will say there is a better option. Have you ever watched like a knot tying or filleting video on youtube? It's crazy how many people complain in the comments(I mean really, watch any filleting video on youtube and there will be 100 comments saying they did a crap job). I mean heck...as a little kid I just tied like 5 regular overhand knots of sometimes got fancy and used a surgeons knot first and I caught plenty of panfish casting off a dock with a bobber and a worm. If it works for your applications than ignore them. I use quite a few knots....I'd say probably 5 on a common basis for fishing. I know how to tie more than that, but often they are just unnecessary. Just depends on situation. Clinch knots usually only slip when they aren't looped enough from my experience. I don't use them often though...always an improved or trilene knot. Clinch knots also aren't the best option for certain line materials like fluorocarbon. The knot I use the most is the polymer knot...I've used it enough to the point where I can tie it with my eyes closed(seriously, it is a good skill to have when it's dark or when fishing with a crazy kid you can't take your eyes off of).
              Maybe that was my problem - I use 6lb fluorocarbon pretty much exclusively. I wasn't aware that the clinch knot isn't best for that type of line.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm an idiot. Now that I've posted this question, sometime in the next few days I'll hook a monster fish -- and I'll lose it when my plain old clinch knot doesn't hold. I really should have thought that through ....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Okwaho View Post
                  I'm an idiot. Now that I've posted this question, sometime in the next few days I'll hook a monster fish -- and I'll lose it when my plain old clinch knot doesn't hold. I really should have thought that through ....
                  @tiough,
                  Are you sure you didn't recently hook a monster fish and have the knot fail making you ask the question in the first place??

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Okwaho View Post
                    I'm an idiot. Now that I've posted this question, sometime in the next few days I'll hook a monster fish -- and I'll lose it when my plain old clinch knot doesn't hold. I really should have thought that through ....
                    It's possible. Of course, you could try to avoid that unpleasant scenario by switching to a different kind of knot, but then it will probably fail too, and you'll be left wondering if it was the knot, or if you had jinxed yourself.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Okwaho View Post
                      I'm an idiot. Now that I've posted this question, sometime in the next few days I'll hook a monster fish -- and I'll lose it when my plain old clinch knot doesn't hold. I really should have thought that through ....
                      No, JM, that was the gospel truth, I've never had one fail me. Great, now I've said it again -- I'm jinxed for sure. Guess I'll just go hiking this weekend.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                        I used to tie plain clinch knots, and I did have them fail several times. Usually when snagged on something, but a couple times with fish too. So now I tie a plain clinch, then add a double square knot on top. I usually go with 7 twists on the clinch, give or take one. A serious fisherman would probably laugh at my creation, but it works. Can't ever recall one of my super-duper knots failing.
                        I see people touting an "improved" clinch knot, but I've never tried one.
                        @hft,
                        Like any knot it's just learning to do it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Okwaho View Post
                          I'm an idiot. Now that I've posted this question, sometime in the next few days I'll hook a monster fish -- and I'll lose it when my plain old clinch knot doesn't hold. I really should have thought that through ....
                          @Tiough,
                          You're just lucky that you aren't fishing with me. I'd be questioning your knot all day to keep you on edge.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I like the improved clinch knot better because to me they pull tight easier then the regular clinch knot but that is just my personal opinion. I have tried quite a few knots and the improved clinch knot just seems to work the easiest for me,
                            but if the knots you use work for you and suits your purpose than go with them, there are always going to be people who say you did it wrong.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Many years ago when I was just a young boy my dad taught me "his" secret fishing knot for tying your lure/snap to the line. He even wrote it down on a piece of paper, laminated it, and gave it to me with the solemn promise I didn't let it fall into "dangerous hands" lol, and I kept my promise! Still have that piece of paper today. Eventually I came to realize that it was like a family knot: everyone (Uncles, cousins, etc.) used that knot.
                              It had to have been some fifteen or twenty years later that I learned my dad's "secret" knot was actually called the Trilene knot, aka a two turn clinch knot. I've used it pretty much exclusively all my life, on just about every kind of line, catching everything from bluegill to 20 plus pound muskies. I even tested it once with weights and learned the line will break before the knot fails. Long story short it's my go to knot, and I can't wait to pass on the "secret" to my own kids someday.


                              Comment

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