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Do you think that lead split shot and sinkers should be phased out in favor of those composed of non-toxic materials?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    It's phased out a bit here. It's still on the shelves but if you stop in a gas station for an emergency tackle grab it's a coin toss as to whether or not the shot dialer will be lead.
    I've wondered how much it matters.

    As someone else mentioned, on a soft bottom, it's liable to settle to the core of the earth. On a hard bottom, it's very likely that the crevice which stole your sinker is never giving that up to a bird.

    On the other hand, I'm a biter of split shot (and mono has ruined my front teeth). Not ingesting lead particles periodically probably would be better for me.
    Lead: the breakfast of (fishing) champions. Lol

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    • #17
      Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
      The reason I thought about this just now was because the other day I heard a guest on a local talk radio show say that he thought lead fishing tackle would eventually be made illegal, like lead shot has for waterfowl hunting. His reasoning was that waterfowl and other aquatic birds sometimes mistake lead split shot and sinkers for the gravel that they use to digest their food, leading to lead poisoning. I know that making fishing tackle out of lead isn't best, but the thought it possibly being banned took me by surprise a little bit. I must admit that I do use lead sinkers, spinners, etc., and never really give it a second thought. Here's a brief rundown of what they discussed: http://www.wpr.org/how-wisconsinites-may-be-unknowingly-harming-lakes-streams
      If you follow the link from the press story hft references to the WDNR study cited in the article you will find it does not conclude lead fishing tackle has any effect rather it's deer hunters use of lead bullets. These bullets they claim are left in gut piles which eagles eat. The problem with this is, the lead level in eagles peaks in October and WI gun season does open until the last week of Nov. The study also includes lead levels in woodcock. When has anyone seen a woodcock feeding in the water? A more reliable Canadian study found high levels of lead in woodcock, at first they blamed the hunters, but soon discovered in these remote areas there was no one hunting woodcock. The conclusion there was the soil had naturally occurring high lead levels which the earthworms absorbed and then, of course, the woodcock eat the worms to get their lead. Interestingly, there was no mass woodcock die off.
      A couple of take-aways, there is another agenda at work here (anti-hunting & fishing) and WPR is not a credible news source.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
        The reason I thought about this just now was because the other day I heard a guest on a local talk radio show say that he thought lead fishing tackle would eventually be made illegal, like lead shot has for waterfowl hunting. His reasoning was that waterfowl and other aquatic birds sometimes mistake lead split shot and sinkers for the gravel that they use to digest their food, leading to lead poisoning. I know that making fishing tackle out of lead isn't best, but the thought it possibly being banned took me by surprise a little bit. I must admit that I do use lead sinkers, spinners, etc., and never really give it a second thought. Here's a brief rundown of what they discussed: http://www.wpr.org/how-wisconsinites-may-be-unknowingly-harming-lakes-streams
        If you follow the link from the press story hft references to the WDNR study cited in the article you will find it does not conclude lead fishing tackle has any effect rather it's deer hunters use of lead bullets. These bullets they claim are left in gut piles which eagles eat. The problem with this is, the lead level in eagles peaks in October and WI gun season does open until the last week of Nov. The study also includes lead levels in woodcock. When has anyone seen a woodcock feeding in the water? A more reliable Canadian study found high levels of lead in woodcock, at first they blamed the hunters, but soon discovered in these remote areas there was no one hunting woodcock. The conclusion there was the soil had naturally occurring high lead levels which the earthworms absorbed and then, of course, the woodcock eat the worms to get their lead. Interestingly, there was no mass woodcock die off.
        A couple of take-aways, there is another agenda at work here (anti-hunting & fishing) and WPR is not a credible news source.

        Comment


        • #19
          In the WDNR study, loons on northern WI lakes have been found dead with lead sinkers in them. Loons are deep-diving birds that eat fish. A reasonable person could conclude that lead fishing tackle contributed to their deaths. And/or the line, hook and sinkers internally strangled them, all of this tackle was found intact.

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          • #20
            In the WDNR study, loons on northern WI lakes have been found dead with lead sinkers in them. Loons are deep-diving birds that eat fish. A reasonable person could conclude that lead fishing tackle contributed to their deaths. And/or the line, hook and sinkers internally strangled them, all of this tackle was found intact.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
              The reason I thought about this just now was because the other day I heard a guest on a local talk radio show say that he thought lead fishing tackle would eventually be made illegal, like lead shot has for waterfowl hunting. His reasoning was that waterfowl and other aquatic birds sometimes mistake lead split shot and sinkers for the gravel that they use to digest their food, leading to lead poisoning. I know that making fishing tackle out of lead isn't best, but the thought it possibly being banned took me by surprise a little bit. I must admit that I do use lead sinkers, spinners, etc., and never really give it a second thought. Here's a brief rundown of what they discussed: http://www.wpr.org/how-wisconsinites-may-be-unknowingly-harming-lakes-streams
              Interesting. I should've dug a little deeper before posting, but I was mostly interested in what everyone thought of the guy's opinion anyway. I wasn't sure if I believed it myself.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                The reason I thought about this just now was because the other day I heard a guest on a local talk radio show say that he thought lead fishing tackle would eventually be made illegal, like lead shot has for waterfowl hunting. His reasoning was that waterfowl and other aquatic birds sometimes mistake lead split shot and sinkers for the gravel that they use to digest their food, leading to lead poisoning. I know that making fishing tackle out of lead isn't best, but the thought it possibly being banned took me by surprise a little bit. I must admit that I do use lead sinkers, spinners, etc., and never really give it a second thought. Here's a brief rundown of what they discussed: http://www.wpr.org/how-wisconsinites-may-be-unknowingly-harming-lakes-streams
                Just noticed something after I posted - the number of bald eagle fatalities attributed to lead poisoning actually peaks in December and January. That would seem to confirm the theory that they're ingesting the lead during and after the November gun deer season.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
                  The reason I thought about this just now was because the other day I heard a guest on a local talk radio show say that he thought lead fishing tackle would eventually be made illegal, like lead shot has for waterfowl hunting. His reasoning was that waterfowl and other aquatic birds sometimes mistake lead split shot and sinkers for the gravel that they use to digest their food, leading to lead poisoning. I know that making fishing tackle out of lead isn't best, but the thought it possibly being banned took me by surprise a little bit. I must admit that I do use lead sinkers, spinners, etc., and never really give it a second thought. Here's a brief rundown of what they discussed: http://www.wpr.org/how-wisconsinites-may-be-unknowingly-harming-lakes-streams
                  How many gut piles contain bullets? I would venture, virtually none. We use rifles here, even if a deer is gut shot the bullet most likely passes through. So then you'd have to believe the eagle goes looking for the bloody bullet. As I understand lead poisoning is a cumulative effect, not an immediate one. Notice the research is research of other, past, research studies; a prime example of cherry picking your data, usually an indication of an agenda in need of justification.

                  Comment

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