Top Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hi...!!I've always wondered...that during torrential rains...which make the trout streams running MANY times faster than normal...What happens to the trout...??Do they get washed away...stay where they are...or what...??

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gary Devine
    replied
    Fast moving rivers and streams have calm spots called an eddy.
    The trout find these spots to avoid the fast current.
    These three guys shown below in the photo, are taking a break in a large eddy.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    Depends on how bad the flood is, and how much structure there is in the stream to shelter the fish. On streams with a good amount of rocks and logs in the water, as well as sharp bends to break the flow, most of the fish just hunker down out of the strongest current and wait it out in all but the strongest of floods. But in poorer streams, or really bad floods, some do get washed downstream. When you get one of those events, it can make for some interesting fishing, because trout (and other fish as well) sometimes end up where you've never seen them before.
    huntfishtrap, my knowledge of spinners on a one to ten basis is a minus six. I don't know why
    that is one lure I know nothing about. Too busy I guess with learning how to use others means
    and being somewhat successful with them. Are there tricks to presentation and retreive or are
    they pretty much straight forward to use ? And are there certain spinners that are easier or
    better to use ? I can imagine these questions are pretty basic to most fishermen, but this one
    knows nothing of there use.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    I agree with huntfish, but will add that on those high water days, if you can see the structure, and can drop a weighted worm or soft grub just so, really tight to the cover, the fish may still be eating.
    I don't have anything like the skill to try that with fly tackle and make it work, but the reaction bite for hook and sinker guys is still there. The fish's location is more predictable, the casting and positioning is just harder.
    Some of the best day's I've had on small trout streams were days I couldn't convince anyone to come along.
    I've gotten pickier as I now have more opportunity.
    Back then it was often Now or Never or I'm going to go out of my damned skull if I don't get some quiet time.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    They hide behind rocks out of the strong current.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    Depends on how bad the flood is, and how much structure there is in the stream to shelter the fish. On streams with a good amount of rocks and logs in the water, as well as sharp bends to break the flow, most of the fish just hunker down out of the strongest current and wait it out in all but the strongest of floods. But in poorer streams, or really bad floods, some do get washed downstream. When you get one of those events, it can make for some interesting fishing, because trout (and other fish as well) sometimes end up where you've never seen them before.
    If you ever want advice on using spinners, let me know. I'm no expert, but I'd be happy to pass on whatever I do know.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    I agree with huntfish, but will add that on those high water days, if you can see the structure, and can drop a weighted worm or soft grub just so, really tight to the cover, the fish may still be eating.
    I don't have anything like the skill to try that with fly tackle and make it work, but the reaction bite for hook and sinker guys is still there. The fish's location is more predictable, the casting and positioning is just harder.
    Some of the best day's I've had on small trout streams were days I couldn't convince anyone to come along.
    Good thing you put that clarification in there, otherwise I would've been very curious to know how you caught worms on those lures! Lol I don't fish high water much, because it's generally not ideal for spinners.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    Depends on how bad the flood is, and how much structure there is in the stream to shelter the fish. On streams with a good amount of rocks and logs in the water, as well as sharp bends to break the flow, most of the fish just hunker down out of the strongest current and wait it out in all but the strongest of floods. But in poorer streams, or really bad floods, some do get washed downstream. When you get one of those events, it can make for some interesting fishing, because trout (and other fish as well) sometimes end up where you've never seen them before.
    It seems, huntfishtrap, that much of the water that I used to fish has become much harder to
    gain access to. Over the years much of the land that was open public land has been purchased by
    others. I know the waters are still public but there has to be a access point some place and I guess
    I just got tired of going thru the hassel. In my younger years one could go where ever. Time can
    change things for the better, but it can also ruin many things also. Thanks for the information on
    inline spinners, maybe I will venture out one more time and give them a try, I surely do miss the water
    and the tranquility of same.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    I agree with huntfish, but will add that on those high water days, if you can see the structure, and can drop a weighted worm or soft grub just so, really tight to the cover, the fish may still be eating.
    I don't have anything like the skill to try that with fly tackle and make it work, but the reaction bite for hook and sinker guys is still there. The fish's location is more predictable, the casting and positioning is just harder.
    Some of the best day's I've had on small trout streams were days I couldn't convince anyone to come along.
    fish.. not worms.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    I agree with huntfish, but will add that on those high water days, if you can see the structure, and can drop a weighted worm or soft grub just so, really tight to the cover, the fish may still be eating.
    I don't have anything like the skill to try that with fly tackle and make it work, but the reaction bite for hook and sinker guys is still there. The fish's location is more predictable, the casting and positioning is just harder.
    Some of the best day's I've had on small trout streams were days I couldn't convince anyone to come along.
    I had one high water day that will always be in my memory as THAT DAY. Tight to cover worked, but if you found a bigger area of backwater it was that day where fish hit everything. I got bored with catching fish to the point where I started digging in the box for stuff that was in there out of habit. I caught worms on spinners, a kastmaster, a phoebe, a daredevil, a pin minnow that no other fish had ever even looked at that I'm aware, it just didn't matter. I'll probably never had another day like it. But I remember.
    Mauche Chunk Creek above Jim Thorpe (formally Mauch Chunk), PA.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    Originally posted by jcarlin View Post
    I agree with huntfish, but will add that on those high water days, if you can see the structure, and can drop a weighted worm or soft grub just so, really tight to the cover, the fish may still be eating.
    I don't have anything like the skill to try that with fly tackle and make it work, but the reaction bite for hook and sinker guys is still there. The fish's location is more predictable, the casting and positioning is just harder.
    Some of the best day's I've had on small trout streams were days I couldn't convince anyone to come along.
    I have heard that live bait can be very effective for trout when the water is high and/or murky. I haven't used live bait for trout for years though. Just kind of got out of the habit, and I prefer spinners anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    Depends on how bad the flood is, and how much structure there is in the stream to shelter the fish. On streams with a good amount of rocks and logs in the water, as well as sharp bends to break the flow, most of the fish just hunker down out of the strongest current and wait it out in all but the strongest of floods. But in poorer streams, or really bad floods, some do get washed downstream. When you get one of those events, it can make for some interesting fishing, because trout (and other fish as well) sometimes end up where you've never seen them before.
    Have you ever tried inline spinners? They're what I use for trout, and while I am far from a great fisherman, I usually have good luck with them. They're not hard to use, once you get the hang of it. Sorry to hear that you don't get out on the water much any more.

    Leave a comment:


  • jcarlin
    replied
    I agree with huntfish, but will add that on those high water days, if you can see the structure, and can drop a weighted worm or soft grub just so, really tight to the cover, the fish may still be eating.
    I don't have anything like the skill to try that with fly tackle and make it work, but the reaction bite for hook and sinker guys is still there. The fish's location is more predictable, the casting and positioning is just harder.
    Some of the best day's I've had on small trout streams were days I couldn't convince anyone to come along.

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    Depends on how bad the flood is, and how much structure there is in the stream to shelter the fish. On streams with a good amount of rocks and logs in the water, as well as sharp bends to break the flow, most of the fish just hunker down out of the strongest current and wait it out in all but the strongest of floods. But in poorer streams, or really bad floods, some do get washed downstream. When you get one of those events, it can make for some interesting fishing, because trout (and other fish as well) sometimes end up where you've never seen them before.
    I was brought up on small brookie streams in northern Michigan back in the late 40's and early 50's by
    my Grandfather and he being of the old school, bait was always worms. After my military years I upgraded
    to dry fly fishing, still on small streams or better known as creeks. The problem with small streams is that
    there is usually real tight space to manuver a fly line so it is difficult fishing. Other things have come into
    my life in later years and I do very little fishing now although I do miss it greatly. It is amazing how things
    I once thought were necessary and important are now mostly memories. We just get old too damn fast.

    Leave a comment:


  • huntfishtrap
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    Depends on how bad the flood is, and how much structure there is in the stream to shelter the fish. On streams with a good amount of rocks and logs in the water, as well as sharp bends to break the flow, most of the fish just hunker down out of the strongest current and wait it out in all but the strongest of floods. But in poorer streams, or really bad floods, some do get washed downstream. When you get one of those events, it can make for some interesting fishing, because trout (and other fish as well) sometimes end up where you've never seen them before.
    Lol. How do you usually fish for trout?

    Leave a comment:


  • bowhunter75richard
    replied
    Originally posted by huntfishtrap View Post
    Depends on how bad the flood is, and how much structure there is in the stream to shelter the fish. On streams with a good amount of rocks and logs in the water, as well as sharp bends to break the flow, most of the fish just hunker down out of the strongest current and wait it out in all but the strongest of floods. But in poorer streams, or really bad floods, some do get washed downstream. When you get one of those events, it can make for some interesting fishing, because trout (and other fish as well) sometimes end up where you've never seen them before.
    Excellent comment, huntfishtrap. I have sometimes wondered that myself, usally after being
    unsuccessful catching the little devils. I was thinking they watched the weather report and
    simply moved out until the all clear was given, you can just not trust anything that doesn't
    want to be eaten !!! As far as seeing them "where you've never seen them before" goes, that
    also includes my frying pan. It is a good thing my survival in life did not depend on trout, it
    would have been a short existance.

    Leave a comment:

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Outdoor Life's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Outdoor Life, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on outdoorlife.com.

Right Rail 1 Ad

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2 Ad

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

  • Happy Thanksgiving !
    by bowhunter75richard
    Wishing all users on the site a wonderful and safe Thanksgiving ! How far will some of you be driving to spend this great family time with your families...
    11-25-2019, 01:39 AM

Right Rail 3 Ad

Collapse

Footer Ad Widget

Collapse
Working...
X